Pocket Nurse Distributes New VR Training System from VES | IMSH 2017 Video Interview

vr training pocket nurse

At IMSH 2017 HealthySimulation.com interviewed Virtual Education Systems at the Pocket Nurse booth to learn more about their VR task trainer that utilizes HTC Vive technology. Watch the video interview below to see this awesome technology in action!

Train Better in VR Simulated Environments



Now with VES VR training systems, new nurses can train with interactive patients in-hospital simulations making critical decisions in real-time. Whether it is clinical training or refreshing skills, healthcare professionals can train in realistic game based scenarios developing competencies that save lives. VES technology allows educators to integrate cases quickly and easily, creating a simple to understand case builder that is web-based was a top priority from the beginning.

VES VR Training Provides:

  • Experiential Learning: Interactive cases that teach through experience and repetition
  • Multi-Platforms: Virtual reality, web, and mobile
  • Learning Management Integration: Deploy through any LMS Assess learning autonomously on an individual or group level
  • Competency Assessment: VES-Case Builder Create custom cases suited to the individual needs of your establishment
  • Debriefing: Each case generates a log of time and decisions, along with downloadable PDF
  • 24/7: Virtual patient cases can be taken any time anywhere
  • Simulates Physiological Responses: Accurate virtual patients respond correctly to treatments
  • Cost Effective: Individual training below current evaluation and training methods

Learn more at the Pocket Nurse website today!


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Sports Training Demonstrates Future Use of VR in Healthcare Simulation

training in VR

The potential of VR is unlimited when it comes to hand-eye coordination. Identification and initial action will be huge opportunities with the immersive technology. Imagine being able to train residents from 5 different countries in an OR procedure at the same time, or train doctors in a new skill based off emerging technology that no one has ever used before, or having a new nursing student do patient safety assessment without the need for a million dollar sim lab room? All of these things and more will be possible through the advancement of VR training platforms.

Over on UploadVR.com they recently interviewed the Clemson Football coach, on how they are already using VR to help players identify a blitz:

“I didn’t know what to expect early on from (the VR), but it’s been great for us,” Clemson coach Dabo Swinney says. “We’ve learned how to maximize the efficiency of it. Deshaun might go through yesterday’s blitz script. (Linebacker) Ben Boulware can go in and practice without having to practice. Sometimes a guy who is hurt can still get mental reps. There’s just so many uses for it. It’s been a great teaching tool.”

While the NFL may be welcoming a QB partially molded by VR, it’s not known if he’ll continue to utilize it with his next team. Clemson, however, is already grooming Watson’s successor by having him split time meeting with his QB coach and going through concepts in VR. Though the value of physical talent won’t be diminishing, it’s going to be interesting to see how a generation of players sharpened by VR do over time.

The NFL is reportable using VR to help refs make the best calls:

In statements made while interviewing with BizTech, the NFL’s SVP, Chief Information Officer Michelle McKenna-Doyle stated the the league was “in the early phases of developing VR training materials for referees”. The NFL has already fostered a relationship with VR companies via concussion recognition, various film and video series, and post-game coverage, so it makes perfect sense to bring it to officiating as well.

Emulating the angles and slow motion clips that referees get access to during replay review in live games shouldn’t be an issue for virtual reality, but hopefully the VR simulations will be detailed enough that refs can watch plays unfold in natural game speed with enough definition to notice things a bit better. It’s tough to imagine this tech being efficient while officials are still part-time, but hopefully this technology will find a home within the league.

Sports franchises are always investigating the use of latest technologies to gain a leg up on the competition, and are thus much faster at adopting new technologies — so certainly healthcare simulation champions should look into the sports industry from time to time to see what is sticking — because it will soon be on our doorstep!

Read these stories on UploadVr!

Conquer Mobile Wins Best in Show Award at IMSH2017 Showcase with PeriopSim VR Training for Nurses

Conquer Mobile was awarded ‘Best in Show” at the International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (IMSH) Serious Games and Virtual Environments Showcase in Orlando last week. The company won the small company / entrepreneurial award for its PeriopSim Virtual Reality training for OR nurses.

Vancouver, BC (PRWEB) – February 7, 2017 – Conquer Mobile today announced that the company won a key award at IMSH, the leading event for the healthcare simulation industry, in Orlando this week. The IMSH Serious Games and Virtual Environments Showcase brought together 33 participants demonstrating innovative simulation training solutions for healthcare. A judging panel from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) made awards in 4 categories: large company, small/entrepreneurial company, researcher and student. Conquer Mobile won the entrepreneurial award for its PeriopSim VR instrument training for OR nurses.

The company’s PeriopSim iPad simulation training platform is already in use in over 300 facilities across North America. The fully immersive PeriopSim VR solution, using the HTC Vive hardware, was unveiled for the first time at the IMSH Serious Games showcase.
“We are so excited to win this award,” commented Angela Robert, CEO of Conquer Mobile. “PeriopSim VR has already been used in academic research but this is the first time we have shown our new immersive instrument trainer at a conference.”
This year’s IMSH conference was held from January 28-February 1 at the Hyatt Regency in Orlando Florida. IMSH brings together over 2,500 physicians, nurses, educators, administrators, centre operations directors, technology specialists and other health care leaders in medical simulation. The Serious Games and Virtual Environments Showcase is in its fifth year and attracts vendors and researchers from all over the world with new and innovative simulation solutions.
About PeriopSim
PeriopSim is a simulation training solution for iPad and VR, for clinicians who need to learn surgical instruments and procedures. PeriopSim enables surgical staff to practice safely before surgery.  Using video of real surgeries and voice prompts, users are guided through a surgery and prompted to use the correct tool at every step. Gamification techniques such as scoring and timed challenges motivate learners to practice and hone their skills. It is aimed at both students and experienced perioperative nurses preparing for unfamiliar procedures. It is designed to be purchased by educators, as part of a hospital education program, as an institutional purchase.
The product is currently part of a pilot program with the Association of Perioperative Nurses (AORN). It is in use at over 300 facilities across North America and is the subject of the top ranking international peer reviewed academic research paper on BioMedCentral. The paper, ‘Simulation-based training for burr hole surgery instrument recognition’, looks at the impact of simulation training for instrument knowledge and recognition among neurosurgery residents
PeriopSim is available as a free preview version on the App Store here: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id960363034&mt=8 .
About Conquer Mobile
Conquer Mobile is an education technology company specializing in healthcare. With deep expertise in VR, simulation, UX and gamification, the team creates engaging apps that deliver education as an experience. Current focus areas include: medical simulation training, enterprise safety education and custom VR and healthcare apps.

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Virtual Medical Coaching Provides VR Radiographic Simulation Training

virtual medical coaching

New Zealand based Virtual Medical Coaching has launched VR based simulated radiography training taking advantage of 3d-spacing to train medial professionals with realistic physical motion skills training requirements.

About VMC

Virtual Medical Coaching offers you the world’s first true Virtual Reality application for learning radiographic positions and principles. In the radiation free simulator, the user can perform radiographic examinations as in the real world, critique the resulting images and get instant metric feedback in a way that is impossible in conventional education. The simulator allows for unlimited training in the immersive, safe environment. In addition, our adaptive e-coaching modules move e-learning from linear training to a more sophisticated program able to adapt to learners’ needs. Combining practical skills assessment, classroom training, and e-coaching is integral to Virtual Medical Coaching’s design.

The Benefits of Training in VR

According to Andrew Connell, CTO of Virtalis, we trap learners behind the computer screen now, so they can only touch with a mouse. “But we want people to become immersed in their 3D model; to reach in with their hands and really dig about inside a product to explore, learn about, and improve it, while also communicating with others in the organization about those products.” Virtual Medical Coaching offers that. Users are able to access and experience, in real-time, an interactive and immersive VR environment created from 3D datasets. If they want to touch the patient they reach out and do so; if they want to adjust some machinery they turn the controls with their hands. All of this, of course, in a virtual world. Numerous studies have demonstrated that close to half the students who study STEM (science, technology, engineering, and maths) subjects in school end up dropping those subjects at undergraduate level, and one of the common complaints about STEM education is it relies too heavily on theory and doesn’t provide a lot of hands-on experiences to students.

Learn more on the VMC website!

Immersive Media Initiative Uses VR to Train Healthcare Students

Immersive Media Initiative uses virtual reality to train medical students

Almost weekly now, healthcare educational programs around the world are receiving grants and other financial support to explore the use of VR in healthcare education and training. Check out this recent article from the POST and an almost $1M grant to fund such research at Ohio University:

Alexa Hoynacke, a senior studying industrial systems engineering, plays a virtual reality game that involves touching targets as a part of the LEARNING study in Grover Center on November 5, 2015. Along with entertainment, virtual reality can also be used for healthcare purposes. With new virtual reality simulations, medical students can practice procedures and gain confidence in their craft faster. Since receiving an $878,000 grant from Ohio University’s Innovation Strategy program, the Immersive Media Initiative team was able to begin work on a handful of virtual reality projects — they have tackled filmmaking and enhanced journalism, and they have also been busy with multiple VR projects in the medical field.

Last summer, the Immersive Media Initiative shot 360-degree footage of emergency room patients. This was their first project in virtual reality healthcare. Eric Williams, associate professor of media arts and studies and co-creator of Immersive Media Initiative, consulted with Dr. Thanh Nguyn since he is in charge of training six medical students every semester. Williams said, “Here’s the technology we have, how can we help you train your interns better.” Williams said virtual reality lets you “go and and watch the same trauma bay procedure and figure out how everything works.” Medical students can benefit from using virtual reality as part of their training because traditional methods do not allow for as

Since receiving an $878,000 grant from Ohio University’s Innovation Strategy program, the Immersive Media Initiative team was able to begin work on a handful of virtual reality projects — they have tackled filmmaking and enhanced journalism, and they have also been busy with multiple VR projects in the medical field.

much access to bodies. There is only a limited supply of cadavers to work on, and the E.R. can receive an unsteady stream of new patients.

“Virtual reality not only makes it to feel like a person but makes it look like a person,” Fredricks said.


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You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

new tech in healthcare

Chris Merritt, recently wrote an article for McKnights News on the evolution of healthcare education through modern day technologies — which should be forwarded along to simulation discomfiters, or naysayers, in your simulation program! Chris theorizes that online gaming is the future of healthcare education!

The rapid advancements in technology continuously impact our lives on a daily basis and each new week brings a critical update to our attention. This has significantly changed the ways in which we receive and process information such as current events, the daily news, industry updates, association content, medical journals and even our educational materials. You do not need to look any further than a grade-school classroom in which personal tablets have replaced pencil and paper for our youngest generation. This transformation has occurred not because it is the cheapest alternative, in fact this migration can often times be more expensive on the front-end.

We are changing our educational delivery mechanisms due to improved learner experience, retention and overall knowledge outcomes. A 2008 study by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation reported that a great lecture can improve learning outcomes by 17%, while switching to a different delivery mechanism such as serious gaming can improve learning outcomes by 108%.

Many have acknowledged the explicit need for our healthcare professionals to have a safe environment in which to practice, make mistakes and increase their proficiency in the many critical decisions they make on a daily basis without putting a patient at risk. A 2015 study in The Journal of Clinical Nursing reported in 2015 that, “Finding a new platform to allow all nurses to practice difficult clinical decisions is key. A virtual immersive environment…can provide simulation for nurses to practice making such difficult decisions.”

The evidence is present that these online simulations increase learner engagement and retention while also resulting in improved patient outcomes and a positive impact on healthcare economics. One chronic disease specific online simulation called SiMCare Diabetes has published data which reports: improved glycemic control in patients with A1C >7%, a 60% reduction in the prescription of contraindicated medication and reduced cost by $71 per patient versus those professionals that did not train with the simulation.

Advances in medical education, clinical content, guidelines and standards of care now have a new and improved medium for dissemination. Online training simulations and educational games are continually updated in real-time and given the nature of the platform, content can be rapidly deployed around the globe with the click of a button.

Toyota Utilizes VR to Showcase the Future of Driving Simulation

vr driving in simulation

Imagine if high school students interested in healthcare could put on VR googles and experience the real world realities of being a healthcare provider? Recently Toyota utilized such technology to showcase the future of driving in a Prius — highlighting a potential in healthcare which we think could dramatically cut dropout rates for new healthcare professionals by showing them what the job is really like.

How do you convince a potential car buyer your vehicle is a future-focused choice? One way is to get one of the most iconic creators of cinematic futurescapes to help you build a virtual world that people can drive the car through themselves. Toyota enlisted Syd Mead, the creative visionary behind Blade Runner and Tron‘s vehicles, architecture and more.

Mead provided concept art and designs for Toyota’s VR Prius Prime experience at Disrupt SF 16, which I tried out myself in a sneak preview earlier today. The demo includes a Tilt Brush-like immersive artistic creation component, followed by a “4D” VR ride.

The drive itself takes you through an animated world featuring landscapes and other cars pulled from Mead’s imagination, and it’s actually really convincing when paired with the movements from the seat. You actually have to buckle up when you use it, which I thought was just something to encourage safety in a cutesy way, but which actually is designed to prevent people potentially being thrown from the bucket seat.

Read the full article on TechCrunch!


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Esper Augmented Reality Trainer from 3D4Medical Will Change the Way We Learn Anatomy

augmented reality virtual learning anatomy

3D4Medical Labs makes award-winning medical and fitness software. Their applications are used daily by education and clinical organizations around the globe. They have over 12 million downloads, numerous prestigious awards, and appearances on stage at major industry events. Their anatomical models are the most detailed available on consumer devices, which they build by studying real anatomical structures, and combining them with world-class medical knowledge.

Straight from the 3D4Medical Lab, discover how you will interact with the anatomy using augmented and mixed reality with their new Project Esper. Take a look at the future of medical learning with the video above about this world-class education tool that utterly transforms the way people learn about the human body.

Learn more on the 3D4Medical Labs website!

Microsoft Improves Healthcare Education with Launch of HoloLens Augmented Reality Glasses

hololens

Have you heard about the release of the Hololens from Microsoft yet? This oculus-like device will enable healthcare educators with a plethora of new tools to educate learners with the latest in virtual and augmented reality programs. Navigate anatomy, workspaces, and educational programs in 3d spaces. Track motion and spatial mapping to better learn how learners interact with learning programs. Watch this Microsoft demonstration by School of Medicine Dean Pamela Davis who shows how using holograms to teach anatomy dramatically enhances and accelerates learning:

About Microsoft HoloLens:

Microsoft HoloLens is the first fully untethered holographic computer running Windows 10. It is completely untethered–no wires, phones, or connection to a PC needed. Microsoft HoloLens allows you to place holograms in your physical environment and provides a new way to see your world.

Microsoft HoloLens generates a multi-dimensional image visible to a user so that he or she perceives holographic objects in the physical world. Holographic objects seen with Microsoft HoloLens can be placed in physical locations you choose, move according to their own rules, or remain in a specific location regardless of where you are or in which direction you are looking.

The holograms you’ll see with Microsoft HoloLens can appear life-like, and can move, be shaped, and change according to interaction with you or the physical environment in which they are visible. Use gestures to create, shape, and size holograms. Use your gaze to navigate and explore. Use your voice to communicate with your apps. Microsoft HoloLens understands your movements, gaze, and voice, enabling you to interact with content and information naturally. Using holograms, you can place your digital content, such as apps, information, and even multi-dimensional videos, in the physical space around you, so you can interact with it.

Learn more on the Microsoft HoloLens website!

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality (MMVR22) Launches in Los Angeles

mmvr 22

Today at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles the 22nd annual Medicine Meets Virtual Reality meeting launched to an international audience. HealthySim is on hand to provide updates throughout the day on our @HealthySim twitter account – and stay tuned tomorrow for a blog post covering more activities from the event. For now, learn more about MMVR below:

About MMVR

In 1992, Medicine Meets Virtual Reality first presented a daring vision of patient care and medical education transformed by computer technology. The evolving NextMed / MMVR engages researchers committed to intelligent healthcare—engineers, physicians, scientists, educators, students, industry, military, and futurists—with its creative mix of unorthodox thinking and validated investigation. Conference topics include:

    • Medical simulation and modeling
    • Data visualization and fusion
    • Virtual and augmented reality
    • Imaging devices and methods
    • Robotics, haptics, sensors
    • Human-computer interfaces
    • Data and decision networks, AI, mobile health
    • Wearable and implantable electronics
    • Projection systems
    • Learning and technology
    • Simulator design and validation
    • Physical and mental rehabilitation tools
    • Serious games
    • Surgical registration and navigation
    • Peri-operative guidance
    • Remote and battlefield care
    • Patient and public health monitoring and education

NextMed / MMVR promotes the creation and adoption of IT-enabled tools for patient care and medical education that support better precision, efficiency, and outcomes. The curriculum combines traditional assessment methods with unorthodox problem-solving to stimulate forward-thinking solutions to healthcare problems. Presentations are chosen to educate participants on:

    • Advances in simulation, modeling, and haptics that are upgrading medical education, skills  training, psychotherapy, and physical rehabilitation
    • Novel imaging, visualization, and data fusion methods that make clinical diagnosis and therapy more precise and personalized
    • Robotics and sensors that extend the caregiver’s reach and provide richer patient data
    • Medical intelligence networks that promote a collaborative healthcare environment and enhance decision-making
    • Broader goals, accomplishments, and challenges in the development and application of emerging healthcare technologies

Learn more at the Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Website!