SimforHealth Introduces MedicActiV: Innovative Platform to Create & Share Virtual Clinical Cases, at SESAM 2017 Paris

medicactiv

During the opening of SESAM 2017 in Paris this week, SimforHealth is unveiling MedicActiV, an innovative new platform to consult, create & share virtual clinical cases. Learn how for a LIMITED TIME you can gain free access to this new global resource by reading more below…

We all know there is a gap between theoretical clinical training and physicians’ real-life experience. Students and health professionals must be given the opportunity to work on as many real-life cases as possible, before facing a real patient. Current classical training methods do not fit the rapid growth of medical knowledge. And clearly, medical education needs more realistic and immersive instructional technologies to prepare tomorrow’s clinicians.

SimforHealth, a leading provider of virtual solutions for medical education has created a new way to enhance medical education: The MedicActiV Platform.

MedicActiV is a digital simulation platform, like an international library of virtual clinical cases in any discipline. Healthcare education institutions or healthcare professionals can consult them, and also have the opportunity to create their own virtual clinical case with MedicActiV authoring tool. Once created, they can share it on the platform.


Sponsored Advertisement


The best way to understand how a virtual clinical case looks like on that platform is to watch a video of a vascular medicine case created with the cooperation of Doctor Aalami, Clinical Associate Professor and Vascular Surgeon at the prestigious University of Stanford Medicine. This video is a great way to understand the potential of MedicActiV’s and its compatibility with virtual reality using HTC Vive.

With this launch of the new version of the MedicActiV platform, SimforHealth calls healthcare professionals and institutions to participate in the project, by creating virtual clinical cases and sharing them with the healthcare community. Such a global resource can quickly increase the volume and quality of international medical knowledge.

Those attending SESAM 2017 Paris should stop by SimforHealth Booth EX31 to demo MedicActiV.

Gain FREE access to the system and its already strong library of resources until September!

Learn more on the MedicActiV.com website today!


Sponsored Advertisement:


ECS Leads the Way with VR Training for Healthcare Simulation | IMSH 2017 Video Interview

ecs clinical skills medical simulation

Rounding out HealthySim’s interviews from the IMSH 2017 trade show floor, today we are taking a look at the VR learning system “Clinical Skills” from Engineering & Computer Simulations (ECS). Clinical Skills training application provides medical professionals the ability to easily access scenario-based learning and practice their clinical skills within a clinical environment. Watch the video below to see it in action through the HTC Vive:

The Clinical Skills Mobile App uses a variety of conversation-based scenarios in a deep learning environment, which prompts learners to use specific approaches while conducting patient interviews. The mobile app includes essential environmental cues, such as patient feedback, as well as instructional feedback. The user is evaluated at each step of the clinical exam and cannot progress until the correct action is performed.

Benefits to medical professionals:

  • Interact with medical inventory items to take vital signs and perform physical examinations on realistic patient avatars
  • Proper sequencing of events
  • Reinforces patient interview techniques
  • Incorporates productive patient dialogue
  • Helps hone diagnostic reasoning skills that can be applied to a number of situations — both in regular checkups and even in more severe cases, where extreme sensitivity is required

Learn more about Clinical Skills on the ECS Website today!

Serious Games Conference Features Future of AR and VR in Healthcare – July 18-20 VA

ar in healthcare simulation

Is your program or institution looking specifically at VR and AR for healthcare applications? Check out this Serious Play Conference July 18-20 at the George Mason University!

Use of VR for Game-Based Learning Growing; Healthcare, Govt, Education Apps at Serious Play Thought leaders leading sessions at Serious Play Conference in July will share their experience using Virtual Reality to create education and training games. Speakers at the gathering, hosted by the Virginia Serious Game Institute (VSGI) at George Mason University’s Science and Technology Campus outside DC include many speakers and topics such as these presentations focusing on healthcare:

  • Mobile VR & AR Games for Healthcare by David Metcalf Institute for Simulation and Training, UCF
  • Clinical Tools VR for Complicated 3D Healthcare Structures Bradley Turner
  • How VR and AR Will Revolutionize Healthcare by Walter Greenleaf Stanford School of Medicine

Serious Play is a gathering where creators and learning professionals can have critical conversations about game design requirements and share their knowledge with peers. The focus of the conference is exploring opportunities, challenges and the potential of game-based learning. Their goal is to provide a forum for visionary educators, chief learning officers and heads of training programs in health care, government/military or other fields that want to learn how to improve the effectiveness of their program, and use the data collected to do even better.

Healthcare Track Sessions Include:

  1. Thomas Talbot USC Institute for Creative Technologies: Time to Leave the Lab, What Will it Take to Make Useful Games Viable for People and Businesses?
  2. David Metcalf Institute for Simulation and Training, UCF: Mobile Games Developed for Military Healthcare Training
  3. Scott Simpkins Applied Physics Laboratory Johns Hopkins: Using Games to Improve Clinical Practice and Healthcare Administration
  4. Alexander Libin Georgetown University: Predictive Analytics for an Embedded Assessment Framework: Developing Data-based Multimedia Technologies
  5. Students From Univ of Washington iSchool with Ran Hinrichs: Serious Play in Government Leadership Training
  6. Kevin Holloway Center for Deployment Psychology Uniformed Services Univ Of the Health Sciences: Virtual Professional Training in Evidence Based Psychotherapies, Gaming for Behavioral Health Providers
  7. Ran Hinrichs 2b3d Studios: Using Games to Study the Psychological Impact of Military Deployment
  8. Walter Greenleaf Virtual Human Interaction Lab Stanford University School of Medicine: How Virtual and Augmented Reality Technology will Revolutionize Healthcare
  9. Brad Tanner: Clinical Tools 3D Virtual Reality Using Oculus to Teach Complicated 3D Structures in Healthcare
  10. Doris Rusch DePaul University: Integrating Academia, Healthcare Professionals and Patients to Create a Learning Game for Chronically Ill Patient Diseases
  11. Dmitriy Babichenko Lorin Grieve, Jonathan Velez University of Pittsburgh: To Scope or Not To Scope: Challenges of Gamifying Clinical Procedures Training
  12. Kimberly Hieftje Yale Center for Health & Learning Games: Re-purposing Serious Games: Making the Development Time Count Twice (or More)
  13. Kenneth Bibbins PrepWorld Philliph Mutisya NC Central University: Trauma Informed Game Based Learning for Kids
  14. Beth Rogozinski Pear Therapeutics: The Challenges of Creating Mobile Games for Regulated Health Situations
  15. Lisa Marriott OHSU/PSU School of Public Health: Working with Local Schools on Nutrition Education
  16. David Wortley GAETSS, UK: Trends in Serious Games for Health and Well-Being

Learn more and Register on the Serious Games Website today!

 


Sponsored Advertisement:


Pocket Nurse Distributes New VR Training System from VES | IMSH 2017 Video Interview

vr training pocket nurse

At IMSH 2017 HealthySimulation.com interviewed Virtual Education Systems at the Pocket Nurse booth to learn more about their VR task trainer that utilizes HTC Vive technology. Watch the video interview below to see this awesome technology in action!

Train Better in VR Simulated Environments

Now with VES VR training systems, new nurses can train with interactive patients in-hospital simulations making critical decisions in real-time. Whether it is clinical training or refreshing skills, healthcare professionals can train in realistic game based scenarios developing competencies that save lives. VES technology allows educators to integrate cases quickly and easily, creating a simple to understand case builder that is web-based was a top priority from the beginning.

VES VR Training Provides:

  • Experiential Learning: Interactive cases that teach through experience and repetition
  • Multi-Platforms: Virtual reality, web, and mobile
  • Learning Management Integration: Deploy through any LMS Assess learning autonomously on an individual or group level
  • Competency Assessment: VES-Case Builder Create custom cases suited to the individual needs of your establishment
  • Debriefing: Each case generates a log of time and decisions, along with downloadable PDF
  • 24/7: Virtual patient cases can be taken any time anywhere
  • Simulates Physiological Responses: Accurate virtual patients respond correctly to treatments
  • Cost Effective: Individual training below current evaluation and training methods

Learn more at the Pocket Nurse website today!

Virtual Medical Coaching Provides VR Radiographic Simulation Training

virtual medical coaching

New Zealand based Virtual Medical Coaching has launched VR based simulated radiography training taking advantage of 3d-spacing to train medial professionals with realistic physical motion skills training requirements.

About VMC

Virtual Medical Coaching offers you the world’s first true Virtual Reality application for learning radiographic positions and principles. In the radiation free simulator, the user can perform radiographic examinations as in the real world, critique the resulting images and get instant metric feedback in a way that is impossible in conventional education. The simulator allows for unlimited training in the immersive, safe environment. In addition, our adaptive e-coaching modules move e-learning from linear training to a more sophisticated program able to adapt to learners’ needs. Combining practical skills assessment, classroom training, and e-coaching is integral to Virtual Medical Coaching’s design.

The Benefits of Training in VR

According to Andrew Connell, CTO of Virtalis, we trap learners behind the computer screen now, so they can only touch with a mouse. “But we want people to become immersed in their 3D model; to reach in with their hands and really dig about inside a product to explore, learn about, and improve it, while also communicating with others in the organization about those products.” Virtual Medical Coaching offers that. Users are able to access and experience, in real-time, an interactive and immersive VR environment created from 3D datasets. If they want to touch the patient they reach out and do so; if they want to adjust some machinery they turn the controls with their hands. All of this, of course, in a virtual world. Numerous studies have demonstrated that close to half the students who study STEM (science, technology, engineering, and maths) subjects in school end up dropping those subjects at undergraduate level, and one of the common complaints about STEM education is it relies too heavily on theory and doesn’t provide a lot of hands-on experiences to students.

Learn more on the VMC website!


Sponsored Advertisement:


Comprehensive List of Journals for Game-Based Learning, Simulations, Serious Games & VR Immersive Learning

learning journals for simulation and game based learning

Leading expert Dr. Michael Sutton, PhD ended 2016 by compiling and awesome list of 45 journals for those interested in the latest research regarding:

  • Game Based Learning
  • Simulations
  • Serious Games
  • Gamification
  • Virtual Reality
  • Immersive Learning

Dr. Sutton introduces the free content hosted on LinkedIn by saying: “My quest for high quality research associated with these topics has been quite a challenge. In attempting to scour the Inet looking for useful material, I have compiled a definitive of journal sources, current to December 31st, 2016. I am sharing this with my readers in the hope that you will find this information very useful and this information will save your significant time and resources.”

Each source has a lengthy details explaining the benefits of the particular journal — what a great resource from Dr. Sutton!

Read the comprehensive list of Journals here!

How Realistic Can Environments Get in VR?

photorealism medical simulation vr

Last week HealthySimulation was on hand at the VR Fest at CES to learn more about the latest in AR/VR technologies– over the next few weeks we will be recapping some of the highlights from those events as well as related content that we believe will have an impact into medical simulation in the future. “Forget 360 Videos, Photogrammetric Virtual Reality Is Where It’s At” suggests Leif Johnson from VICE.

Today we start with a video highlighting the opportunity for photorealistic environments in VR scenes from Realities.io. You won’t believe the level of detail that is possible in complete 3D as you move about these interior spaces. The implications for healthcare simulated environments should be obvious!

FAQ from the Website:

  • What does realities do? Realities lets you explore a growing library of interesting and mesmerizing places from all around the globe in virtual reality that are explorable in photorealistic quality. Travel to places that were out of reach before, e.g. famous tourist sites, archeological and cultural heritages sites and lost places.
  • How do you create the VR environments? Most of our scans are based on photogrammetry. We also use other scanning techniques like LiDAR when necessary.
  • What do I need to experience Realities? Currently we only support HTC Vive, Oculus Rift support will be added soon. Further you need a computer fulfilling the recommended specs for VR (Intel i5 / 4GB RAM / GeForce GTX 970 or equivalent)

Learn more about these environments and download some examples for the HTC and Oculus on the Realities.io Website!


Supported Organization:


You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

new tech in healthcare

Chris Merritt, recently wrote an article for McKnights News on the evolution of healthcare education through modern day technologies — which should be forwarded along to simulation discomfiters, or naysayers, in your simulation program! Chris theorizes that online gaming is the future of healthcare education!

The rapid advancements in technology continuously impact our lives on a daily basis and each new week brings a critical update to our attention. This has significantly changed the ways in which we receive and process information such as current events, the daily news, industry updates, association content, medical journals and even our educational materials. You do not need to look any further than a grade-school classroom in which personal tablets have replaced pencil and paper for our youngest generation. This transformation has occurred not because it is the cheapest alternative, in fact this migration can often times be more expensive on the front-end.

We are changing our educational delivery mechanisms due to improved learner experience, retention and overall knowledge outcomes. A 2008 study by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation reported that a great lecture can improve learning outcomes by 17%, while switching to a different delivery mechanism such as serious gaming can improve learning outcomes by 108%.

Many have acknowledged the explicit need for our healthcare professionals to have a safe environment in which to practice, make mistakes and increase their proficiency in the many critical decisions they make on a daily basis without putting a patient at risk. A 2015 study in The Journal of Clinical Nursing reported in 2015 that, “Finding a new platform to allow all nurses to practice difficult clinical decisions is key. A virtual immersive environment…can provide simulation for nurses to practice making such difficult decisions.”

The evidence is present that these online simulations increase learner engagement and retention while also resulting in improved patient outcomes and a positive impact on healthcare economics. One chronic disease specific online simulation called SiMCare Diabetes has published data which reports: improved glycemic control in patients with A1C >7%, a 60% reduction in the prescription of contraindicated medication and reduced cost by $71 per patient versus those professionals that did not train with the simulation.

Advances in medical education, clinical content, guidelines and standards of care now have a new and improved medium for dissemination. Online training simulations and educational games are continually updated in real-time and given the nature of the platform, content can be rapidly deployed around the globe with the click of a button.

Virtual and Augmented Reality Market To Reach $162 billion by 2020

virtual-reality-utilization-engagement

Sim Champs before you know it AR and VR technologies will become a mandatory part of our healthcare educational programs. The opportunities to learn and train in high-cost risk-heavy environments in a safe and affordable manner will continue to expand through advanced learning technologies like augmented and virtual reality. HealthySim will continue to report tidbits of progress in this arena as its applications to healthcare become ever clearer. Today, we share the expectations of the industries growth to demonstrate the upward trend in utilization:

BusinessInsider.com reports that the total revenue for virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) is projected to increase from $5.2 billion in 2016 to over $162 billion in 2020, according to the IDC:

  • More than half of the revenue will come from VR/AR hardware sales. Additionally, service revenues are projected to increase over the period as demand grows for enterprise-class support. Software was also mentioned as a smaller, but notable revenue source, growing more than 200% year-over-year (YoY) in 2016. Nevertheless, services revenue will quickly surpass it, largely due to demand in the enterprise segment.
  • AR systems will ultimately contribute more revenue than VR systems. Games and paid content will be strong sources of revenue for VR systems, particularly in the next two years. However, this revenue will be eclipsed as AR systems are integrated into healthcare, product design and management-related uses.
  • Most revenue through 2020 will come from the US. The US, Western Europe, and Asia Pacific (excluding Japan) are projected to account for three-quarters of revenue for VR and AR. The US is projected to contribute a larger amount as time progresses.

The adoption of AR and VR headsets will be driven primarily by the introduction of less expensive models to the market, first powered by smartphones before mainstream adoption of stand-alone headsets. While early adopters will drive the initial wave of purchasing, sustainable growth will likely come from VR and AR app developers building a robust and engaging ecosystem of content that entices slower adopters. Lastly, as the underlying technology powering these devices increases, so too will the capabilities, creating new use cases in entertainment, workplaces, and education.

Read the full Market Report on BusinessInsider

DextaRobotics Builds Hand Haptics Device for Virtual Reality Medical Learning

simulated learning in vr

One of the limitations of current virtual reality systems is the lack of tactile feel when engaging with realistic learning environments. Angleing a scalpel, inserting an NG tube, feeling a pulse — all of these critical skills that require touch to learn and perform properly. where touch Without a doubt physical touch technology will have to become integrated into advanced technologies in-order to maximize learning outcomes. Recently, Dexta Robotics released a product which is taking a giant leap forward into the touch of VR. Check out the video to see the prototype in action:

About Dexmo

Compared to other force feedback devices, Dexmo is very light. It can run on battery power and work wirelessly for a relatively long time. Dexmo captures 11 DoF of users’ hand motion. The mechanical linkage nature makes the readings much more robust compared to IMUs. The force feedback ability allows the user to feel the size and shape of any digital object, which greatly improves immersion. Variable stiffness is achieved by precise motor control. With this feature, each virtual object can have their own stiffness. In the past two years we have made over 20 iterations of Dexmo and tested numerous force feedback methods. These valuable experiences helped us build a better human-machine-interaction tool.

Learn more about the Dexmo on the DextaRobotics Website