Virtual Medical Coaching Provides VR Radiographic Simulation Training

virtual medical coaching

New Zealand based Virtual Medical Coaching has launched VR based simulated radiography training taking advantage of 3d-spacing to train medial professionals with realistic physical motion skills training requirements.

About VMC

Virtual Medical Coaching offers you the world’s first true Virtual Reality application for learning radiographic positions and principles. In the radiation free simulator, the user can perform radiographic examinations as in the real world, critique the resulting images and get instant metric feedback in a way that is impossible in conventional education. The simulator allows for unlimited training in the immersive, safe environment. In addition, our adaptive e-coaching modules move e-learning from linear training to a more sophisticated program able to adapt to learners’ needs. Combining practical skills assessment, classroom training, and e-coaching is integral to Virtual Medical Coaching’s design.



The Benefits of Training in VR

According to Andrew Connell, CTO of Virtalis, we trap learners behind the computer screen now, so they can only touch with a mouse. “But we want people to become immersed in their 3D model; to reach in with their hands and really dig about inside a product to explore, learn about, and improve it, while also communicating with others in the organization about those products.” Virtual Medical Coaching offers that. Users are able to access and experience, in real-time, an interactive and immersive VR environment created from 3D datasets. If they want to touch the patient they reach out and do so; if they want to adjust some machinery they turn the controls with their hands. All of this, of course, in a virtual world. Numerous studies have demonstrated that close to half the students who study STEM (science, technology, engineering, and maths) subjects in school end up dropping those subjects at undergraduate level, and one of the common complaints about STEM education is it relies too heavily on theory and doesn’t provide a lot of hands-on experiences to students.

Learn more on the VMC website!


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Comprehensive List of Journals for Game-Based Learning, Simulations, Serious Games & VR Immersive Learning

learning journals for simulation and game based learning

Leading expert Dr. Michael Sutton, PhD ended 2016 by compiling and awesome list of 45 journals for those interested in the latest research regarding:

  • Game Based Learning
  • Simulations
  • Serious Games
  • Gamification
  • Virtual Reality
  • Immersive Learning

Dr. Sutton introduces the free content hosted on LinkedIn by saying: “My quest for high quality research associated with these topics has been quite a challenge. In attempting to scour the Inet looking for useful material, I have compiled a definitive of journal sources, current to December 31st, 2016. I am sharing this with my readers in the hope that you will find this information very useful and this information will save your significant time and resources.”

Each source has a lengthy details explaining the benefits of the particular journal — what a great resource from Dr. Sutton!

Read the comprehensive list of Journals here!

How Realistic Can Environments Get in VR?

photorealism medical simulation vr

Last week HealthySimulation was on hand at the VR Fest at CES to learn more about the latest in AR/VR technologies– over the next few weeks we will be recapping some of the highlights from those events as well as related content that we believe will have an impact into medical simulation in the future. “Forget 360 Videos, Photogrammetric Virtual Reality Is Where It’s At” suggests Leif Johnson from VICE.

Today we start with a video highlighting the opportunity for photorealistic environments in VR scenes from Realities.io. You won’t believe the level of detail that is possible in complete 3D as you move about these interior spaces. The implications for healthcare simulated environments should be obvious!

FAQ from the Website:

  • What does realities do? Realities lets you explore a growing library of interesting and mesmerizing places from all around the globe in virtual reality that are explorable in photorealistic quality. Travel to places that were out of reach before, e.g. famous tourist sites, archeological and cultural heritages sites and lost places.
  • How do you create the VR environments? Most of our scans are based on photogrammetry. We also use other scanning techniques like LiDAR when necessary.
  • What do I need to experience Realities? Currently we only support HTC Vive, Oculus Rift support will be added soon. Further you need a computer fulfilling the recommended specs for VR (Intel i5 / 4GB RAM / GeForce GTX 970 or equivalent)

Learn more about these environments and download some examples for the HTC and Oculus on the Realities.io Website!


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You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

new tech in healthcare

Chris Merritt, recently wrote an article for McKnights News on the evolution of healthcare education through modern day technologies — which should be forwarded along to simulation discomfiters, or naysayers, in your simulation program! Chris theorizes that online gaming is the future of healthcare education!

The rapid advancements in technology continuously impact our lives on a daily basis and each new week brings a critical update to our attention. This has significantly changed the ways in which we receive and process information such as current events, the daily news, industry updates, association content, medical journals and even our educational materials. You do not need to look any further than a grade-school classroom in which personal tablets have replaced pencil and paper for our youngest generation. This transformation has occurred not because it is the cheapest alternative, in fact this migration can often times be more expensive on the front-end.

We are changing our educational delivery mechanisms due to improved learner experience, retention and overall knowledge outcomes. A 2008 study by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation reported that a great lecture can improve learning outcomes by 17%, while switching to a different delivery mechanism such as serious gaming can improve learning outcomes by 108%.

Many have acknowledged the explicit need for our healthcare professionals to have a safe environment in which to practice, make mistakes and increase their proficiency in the many critical decisions they make on a daily basis without putting a patient at risk. A 2015 study in The Journal of Clinical Nursing reported in 2015 that, “Finding a new platform to allow all nurses to practice difficult clinical decisions is key. A virtual immersive environment…can provide simulation for nurses to practice making such difficult decisions.”

The evidence is present that these online simulations increase learner engagement and retention while also resulting in improved patient outcomes and a positive impact on healthcare economics. One chronic disease specific online simulation called SiMCare Diabetes has published data which reports: improved glycemic control in patients with A1C >7%, a 60% reduction in the prescription of contraindicated medication and reduced cost by $71 per patient versus those professionals that did not train with the simulation.

Advances in medical education, clinical content, guidelines and standards of care now have a new and improved medium for dissemination. Online training simulations and educational games are continually updated in real-time and given the nature of the platform, content can be rapidly deployed around the globe with the click of a button.

Virtual and Augmented Reality Market To Reach $162 billion by 2020

virtual-reality-utilization-engagement

Sim Champs before you know it AR and VR technologies will become a mandatory part of our healthcare educational programs. The opportunities to learn and train in high-cost risk-heavy environments in a safe and affordable manner will continue to expand through advanced learning technologies like augmented and virtual reality. HealthySim will continue to report tidbits of progress in this arena as its applications to healthcare become ever clearer. Today, we share the expectations of the industries growth to demonstrate the upward trend in utilization:

BusinessInsider.com reports that the total revenue for virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) is projected to increase from $5.2 billion in 2016 to over $162 billion in 2020, according to the IDC:

  • More than half of the revenue will come from VR/AR hardware sales. Additionally, service revenues are projected to increase over the period as demand grows for enterprise-class support. Software was also mentioned as a smaller, but notable revenue source, growing more than 200% year-over-year (YoY) in 2016. Nevertheless, services revenue will quickly surpass it, largely due to demand in the enterprise segment.
  • AR systems will ultimately contribute more revenue than VR systems. Games and paid content will be strong sources of revenue for VR systems, particularly in the next two years. However, this revenue will be eclipsed as AR systems are integrated into healthcare, product design and management-related uses.
  • Most revenue through 2020 will come from the US. The US, Western Europe, and Asia Pacific (excluding Japan) are projected to account for three-quarters of revenue for VR and AR. The US is projected to contribute a larger amount as time progresses.

The adoption of AR and VR headsets will be driven primarily by the introduction of less expensive models to the market, first powered by smartphones before mainstream adoption of stand-alone headsets. While early adopters will drive the initial wave of purchasing, sustainable growth will likely come from VR and AR app developers building a robust and engaging ecosystem of content that entices slower adopters. Lastly, as the underlying technology powering these devices increases, so too will the capabilities, creating new use cases in entertainment, workplaces, and education.

Read the full Market Report on BusinessInsider

DextaRobotics Builds Hand Haptics Device for Virtual Reality Medical Learning

simulated learning in vr

One of the limitations of current virtual reality systems is the lack of tactile feel when engaging with realistic learning environments. Angleing a scalpel, inserting an NG tube, feeling a pulse — all of these critical skills that require touch to learn and perform properly. where touch Without a doubt physical touch technology will have to become integrated into advanced technologies in-order to maximize learning outcomes. Recently, Dexta Robotics released a product which is taking a giant leap forward into the touch of VR. Check out the video to see the prototype in action:

About Dexmo

Compared to other force feedback devices, Dexmo is very light. It can run on battery power and work wirelessly for a relatively long time. Dexmo captures 11 DoF of users’ hand motion. The mechanical linkage nature makes the readings much more robust compared to IMUs. The force feedback ability allows the user to feel the size and shape of any digital object, which greatly improves immersion. Variable stiffness is achieved by precise motor control. With this feature, each virtual object can have their own stiffness. In the past two years we have made over 20 iterations of Dexmo and tested numerous force feedback methods. These valuable experiences helped us build a better human-machine-interaction tool.

Learn more about the Dexmo on the DextaRobotics Website

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality (MMVR22) Launches in Los Angeles

mmvr 22

Today at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles the 22nd annual Medicine Meets Virtual Reality meeting launched to an international audience. HealthySim is on hand to provide updates throughout the day on our @HealthySim twitter account – and stay tuned tomorrow for a blog post covering more activities from the event. For now, learn more about MMVR below:

About MMVR

In 1992, Medicine Meets Virtual Reality first presented a daring vision of patient care and medical education transformed by computer technology. The evolving NextMed / MMVR engages researchers committed to intelligent healthcare—engineers, physicians, scientists, educators, students, industry, military, and futurists—with its creative mix of unorthodox thinking and validated investigation. Conference topics include:

    • Medical simulation and modeling
    • Data visualization and fusion
    • Virtual and augmented reality
    • Imaging devices and methods
    • Robotics, haptics, sensors
    • Human-computer interfaces
    • Data and decision networks, AI, mobile health
    • Wearable and implantable electronics
    • Projection systems
    • Learning and technology
    • Simulator design and validation
    • Physical and mental rehabilitation tools
    • Serious games
    • Surgical registration and navigation
    • Peri-operative guidance
    • Remote and battlefield care
    • Patient and public health monitoring and education

NextMed / MMVR promotes the creation and adoption of IT-enabled tools for patient care and medical education that support better precision, efficiency, and outcomes. The curriculum combines traditional assessment methods with unorthodox problem-solving to stimulate forward-thinking solutions to healthcare problems. Presentations are chosen to educate participants on:

    • Advances in simulation, modeling, and haptics that are upgrading medical education, skills  training, psychotherapy, and physical rehabilitation
    • Novel imaging, visualization, and data fusion methods that make clinical diagnosis and therapy more precise and personalized
    • Robotics and sensors that extend the caregiver’s reach and provide richer patient data
    • Medical intelligence networks that promote a collaborative healthcare environment and enhance decision-making
    • Broader goals, accomplishments, and challenges in the development and application of emerging healthcare technologies

Learn more at the Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Website!

OSSim Tech Sim-K Virtual Reality Orthopedic Open-Surgery Simulator – Video Interview from IMSH 2016

knee surgical simulator

Continuing our coverage of the IMSH exhibit floor simulation vendors, today we share about the Open Knee Surgical Simulator from OSSim Technologies simulators, which are developed by highly-skilled engineers and clinicians, using the latest  technology in haptic feedback. The virtual reality environment precisely recreates the sound, force, and imaging of real-life actions. OSSim Technologies simulators expand training possibilities in the field of open surgeries by a standardized and quality-assured training method. Medical educators and students can obtain a detailed evaluation of individual learning. Watch our video to see this awesome simulator in action:

About the Sim-K

The SIM-K is the next generation virtual reality simulator designed for the training of medical students and orthopedic residents. The simulator currently enables simulation training for the total knee replacement procedure and practice of surgical skills as bone drilling and sawing. With Sim-K, medical students train and focus on their basic surgical skills effectively — without risk to patients and hospital daily constraints. Different surgical cases are available and surgery procedures can be trained several times — before entering the stressful OR!

Sim-K Features:

  • Experience of real-time haptic feed-back (applied force and resistance).
  • Allows handling and manipulation of handheld drill and saw units.
  • Allows practice of drilling and sawing on different shapes and materials, including bones.
  • Allows practice of the total knee replacement procedure including intervention-based tasks (such as drilling and sawing).
  • Allows tracking of total tools movement (precision, orientation, amplitude, depth), applied forces and tasks completion time.
  • Performing software adaptable to training agenda and curriculum.

SIM-K Components:

  • One quad-core PC
  • One HD flat-screen
  • 5-DoF haptic system
  • 6-DoF tracking system
  • Generic mock-up surgical tools
  • Height-adjustable mobile cart

Learn more at the OSSIM Sim-K Website!

BioMojo Seeks To Provide Leading Virtual Physiological Human Simulation Platform

biomojo simulation training

This week we came across BioMojo, a new veteran owned small business formed for the purpose of improving the safety, efficiency, capacity and clinical performance of healthcare, which seeks to become the world’s leading Virtual Physiological Human Simulation Platform. They will be focusing on the design, development and delivery of best-in-class, data driven, interactive 3D, virtual reality, medical simulation software products using advanced game technologies and an embedded human physiology engine.

Virtual Physiological Humans

Our software platform is a methodological and technological framework based on multiscale mathematical computer models representing parameters of the human body.

Basic models start at the level of cells, tissues and organs. Advanced models include the cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous, digestive, endocrine, immune, lymphatic, muscular, integumentary, excretory, urinary, reproductive and skeletal physiologic systems.

Serious Games, Immersive Simulations and Virtual Worlds

Our subscription based, SaaS solutions combine the virtual physiological human framework with artificial intelligence, learning management systems and the power of commercial game technology (Unreal Engine 4) to create the following:

  • Virtual Reality Games and Simulations
  • Mobile Healthcare Games
  • Augmented Reality Telementoring Tools
  • Medical Decision Support Tools
  • Personal Connected Healthcare Applications
  • Virtual Clinical Trials

Learn more on the BioMojo website!

Case Western Reserve, Cleveland Clinic Collaborate with Microsoft for Mixed-Reality Technology for Education

microsoft medical simulation

Shared from Case Western Reserve University:

Case Western Reserve University Radiology Professor Mark Griswold recently shared how “HoloLens” can transform learning across countless subjects, including those as complex as the human body. Speaking to an in-person and online audience at Microsoft’s annual Build conference, he highlighted disciplines as disparate as art history and engineering—but started with a holographic heart. In traditional anatomy, after all, students like Ghodasara cut into cadavers to understand the body’s intricacies. With HoloLens, Griswold explained, “you see it truly in 3D. You can take parts in and out. You can turn it around. You can see the blood pumping—the entire system.”

In other words, technology not only can match existing educational methods—it can actually improve upon them. Which, in many ways, is why Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove contacted then-Microsoft executive Craig Mundie in 2013, after the hospital and university first agreed to partner on a new education building. “We launched this collaboration to prepare students for a health care future that is still being imagined,” Cleveland Clinic CEO Delos “Toby” Cosgrove said of what has become a 485,000-square-foot Health Education Campus project. “By combining a state-of-the-art structure, pioneering technology, and cutting-edge teaching techniques, we will provide them the innovative education required to lead in this new era.”

Because the technology is relatively easy to use, students will be able to build, operate and analyze all manner of devices and systems. “[It will] encourage experimentation,” Buchner said, “leading to deeper understanding and improved product design.”

In truth, HoloLens ultimately could have applications for dozens of Case Western Reserve’s academic programs. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory already has worked with Microsoft to develop software that will allow Earth-based scientists to work on Mars with a specially designed rover vehicle. A similar collaboration could enable students here to take part in archeological digs around the world. Or astronomy students could stand in the midst of colliding galaxies, securing a front-row view of the unfolding chaos. Art history professors could present masterpieces in their original settings—a centuries-old castle, or even the Sistine Chapel.

“The whole campus has the potential to use this,” Griswold said. “Our ability to use this for education is almost limitless.”

Read the full Hololens article here!