Healthcare Simulation Programs in the News

simulation in the news

HealthySimulation.com loves to share the most recent news agency coverage of healthcare simulation programs around the world! The more our industry gathers public exposure and support the faster our methodology will be expected as the cultural norm, and the sooner we can improve patient safety and learning outcomes through simulation!



Here’s the latest collection of awesome medical simulation news stories from around the web:

  • Queen of the Valley Nurses Trained in Stroke Assessment with Simulators From Napa Valley Register – A “patient” named Hal has helped train some 450 nurses at Queen of the Valley Medical Center to fine-tune their stroke assessment skills. But Hal’s not human. He’s an advanced medical simulation mannequin. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, simulation training allows healthcare providers to apply theoretical knowledge in a controlled environment without risks to patients. “Simulation training supports our goal of providing patients with the highest quality of care,” said JoAnn Munski, nursing director of orthopedic, neuroscience, and rehabilitation services at the Queen. Many aspects of a real-life situation can be simulated, according to trainers Suzy Banuelos and Nancy Stump.
  • Tripler Army Medical Center Stays at Forefront of Technological Advancement From Hawaii Army Weekly – Doctors practice Laparoscopic surgery on a simulated pregnant patient in the Tripler Army Medical Center Simulation Center. The Simulation Center allows hospital staff the opportunity to hone their skills prior to a procedure in order to improve patient services. HONOLULU — Technological advancements have improved health care for years and the military Simulation (SIM) centers have strived to be at the forefront of that advance. That is why Tripler Army Medical Center recently received an upgrade to its SIM center by moving into its new facilities. This move quadrupled the workable space for the SIM center and provided the opportunity to train more staff members and obtain new equipment they didn’t have the space for prior to the move.
  • Simulation Center at Texas Children’s Hospital Prepares Doctors to Save Lives From ABC News 13 – Chief of Service in Anesthesiology, Doctor B. Wycke Baker told ABC13 these simulations are allowing team members to train for situations they might have not experienced yet in real life. “There are certain scenarios that don’t happen very often because of low frequency. But when they happen they’re very high impact,” Baker said. “So we had to resuscitate mother and deliver baby rapidly. So my role in that was the anesthesiologist, assuming care of her resuscitation, and basic and advanced cardiac life support and resuscitate her baby as well.” After every simulation, the team goes over what worked and where improvements are needed. Arnold said, “The debriefing, it is critical for learning. We’re talking about the things that went well so they can continue to do them. Were also talking about the things that didn’t go well so they can learn things for improvement on future clinical cases.”
  • Medical Education Tech Abounds at New Facility for OSU Center for Health Sciences From Tusla World – Construction on the $45 million project in west Tulsa began in October 2015 and is expected to be finished in time for this year’s fall semester. The 84,000-square-foot Tandy Medical Building will include a hospital-simulation center to provide training for students in the OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine. The simulation center will include a fully operational emergency room, operating room, intensive care unit, birthing suite and ambulance bay that will allow students to practice procedures and skills commonly used in hospitals throughout the country.

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The Newest Medical Simulation Center Designs May Surprise You!

designing a sim center

Looking for inspiration for your new sim center? Check out these four new simulation buildings, including a very innovative design from Columbia University:

1) The Vagelos Education Center, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler (as Executive Architect), is a new medical and graduate education building at Columbia University’s Medical Center. The building’s design—which weaves together state-of-the-art medical simulation clinics and labs, tech-enabled classrooms, communal areas for study and socializing, and event spaces—reflects how medicine is taught, learned, and practiced in the 21st century.

Learn more about the Vagelos Education Center at Columbia University

2) The Stephen F. Austin State University Richard and Lucille Dewitt School of nursing is one of only three facilities in Texas that has an onsite simulation lab: The Ed and Gwen Cole Simulation Laboratory, a Laerdal Center of Educational Excellence. The simulation lab is 9,000 square feet with a 10-bed medical surgical area, labor and delivery area, nursery and neonatal area, health assessment lab and an emergency room area. Real medical equipment like IV pumps and crash carts add to the reality of the simulation lab. “It’s a bridge between what we teach the students in class and actual clinical, face-to-face, live humans,” David Smith, coordinator of the simulation lab and clinical instructor, said. “It gives the students a chance to put into practice what they’re learning in class in a risk-free environment.”

Learn more about the new Austin State Sim Lab

3) Hibbing Community College: Over the past three years, Hibbing Community College has developed their new hi-tech Healthcare Simulation Center. They have three rooms that include two clinic bays, an OB and ICU unit, a homecare area, and an infectious control setup. “It’s just cutting edge. It’s preparing students for future practice and it’s real life right in front of them,” said the Director of Nursing, Sandy Gustafson. The health center features high-fidelity mannequins that breathe, have pulses and heart tones, and one even simulates child birth. Students get the hands-on experience they wouldn’t get just by watching in a real hospital setting.

Learn more about the Hibbing Community College Sim Center

4) St. Clair County Community College: The students were working in the newly renovated health simulation labs in the AJ Theisen Building. The renovation is the result of a $350,000 project that combined older medical and surgical simulation equipment with new tools and moved them to the annex of the Theisen Building. Having students work in simulation labs, in which the verbal manikin have pulses and students can hear their hearts and lungs, is not exactly a new concept for SC4 — they have been doing this for the past six years. However, the old simulation lab was in the basement of the Clara E. Mackenzie Building and in a less realistic setting.

Learn more about the St. Clair County Simulation Building