Latest Simulation in Healthcare Journal Article List from SSH

medical simulation research journal

The most recent Simulation in Healthcare Journal (October 2016 – Volume 11 – Issue 5
pp: 301-364) from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare has been posted online! This month’s journal provides a tribute to the “godfather” of medical simulation Dr. Gaba, and an exploration of new simulation technologies to improve healthcare learning outcomes:


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  • Tribute to David Gaba on the Occasion of His Retiring as Editor-in-Chief of Simulation in Healthcare Cooper, Jeffrey B.; Issenberg, Barry S.; DeVita, Michael A.; Glavin, Ronnie
  • Comparison of 4 Laryngoscopes in 2 Difficult Airway Scenarios: A Randomized Crossover Simulation-Based Study Altun, Demet; Ozkan-Seyhan, Tulay; Orhan-Sungur, Mukadder; Sivrikoz, Nukhet; Camci, Emre
  • Mastery Learning of Video Laryngoscopy Using the Glidescope in the Emergency Department Ahn, James; Yashar, Michael D.; Novack, Jared; Davidson, Joey; Lapin, Brittany; Ocampo, Jose; Wang, Ernest
  • Preparation With Web-Based Observational Practice Improves Efficiency of Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Cheung, Jeffrey J.H.; Koh, Jansen; Brett, Clare; Bägli, Darius J.; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam
  • How Do Simulated Error Experiences Impact Attitudes Related to Error Prevention? Breitkreuz, Karen R.; Dougal, Renae L.; Wright, Melanie C.
  • Coaching From the Sidelines: Examining the Impact of Teledebriefing in Simulation-Based Training Ahmed, Rami A.; Atkinson, Steven Scott; Gable, Brad; Yee, Jennifer; Gardner, Aimee K.
  • The Role of Ultrasound Simulation in Obstetrics and Gynecology Training: A UK Trainees’ Perspective Patel, Hersha; Chandrasekaran, Dhivya; Myriokefalitaki, Eva; Gebeh, Alpha; Jones, Kate; Jeve, Yadava B; Midlands
  • Research Collaborative in Obstetrics & Gynecology Simulation for Operational Readiness in a New Freestanding Emergency Department: Strategy and Tactics Kerner, Robert L. Jr.; Gallo, Kathleen; Cassara, Michael; D’Angelo, John; Egan, Anthony; Simmons, John Galbraith
  • An Approach to Confederate Training Within the Context of Simulation-Based Research Adler, Mark D.; Overly, Frank L.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Davidson, Jennifer; Gottesman, Ronald; Bank, Ilana; Marohn, Kimberly; Sudikoff, Stephanie; Grant, Vincent J.; Cheng, Adam;
  • For the International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators Highlighting Instructional Design Features in Reporting Guidelines for Health Care Simulation Research Cheng, Adam; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Chang, Todd P.; Auerbach, Marc

SSH Members can read the latest journal edition here!


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BioMedCentral Interviews Advances in Simulation Editor Debra Nestel on Launch of New Journal

advances in simulation

Exciting news announced at IMSH 2016 by Debra Nestel and SESAM that a new Journal “Advances in Simulation” was launched during the event! BioMedCentral.com interviewed Professor Nestel about this new publication and the future of medical simulation. Debra Nestel is Professor of Simulation Education in Health Care at Monash University, Australia. For over 25 years she has used simulation as an educational method in the context of health care. Professor Nestel has a particular interest in human-based simulations and is experienced in research and development of several simulation modalities.

BioMedCentral.com Asked Debra, “What do you hope will be achieved in the field in the next ten years”?

The seeds of the achievements for the next decade are likely to be planted now. I’ll offer five ideas:

  • First, there is already sufficient simulation research to enable meaningful reviews. This is likely to lead to new theories (of the middle range rather than unified) that will shape further research and the work of simulation practitioners.
  • Second, we will see simulation embedded in curricula for all health and social care professionals. Access to simulation will widen and a greater breadth of modalities will be adopted.
  • Third, professional development for simulation practitioners will lead to greater simulation specialism with a parallel advance of all clinical teachers at minimum thinking about using simulation to design learning activities.
  • Fourth, there will be really exciting developments in technology-based simulations, especially with augmented and virtual realities.
  • Fifth, simulation will form part of patient (and where appropriate their carers) education as well as providing ways of giving the wider community access to health and social care practices such that they may help improve the very services designed for them.
  • Finally, all of these achievements will contribute directly or indirectly to improving patient safety.

Learn more about the new AiS Journal here and Read the Full BioMedCentral Article here!

First Ever Research Specific to Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists Published This Month in SSH Journal

sim tech research

Just received word from Sim Tech Rachel Bailey that the first ever research article about Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists (Simulation Technicians) has been published in the latest edition of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. “Defining the Simulation Technician Role: Results of a Survey-Based Study” was written by Rachel Bailey. Regina Taylor MA, CCRP, CPM, Michael FitzGerald PhD, Benjamin Kerrey MD, MS,Thomas LeMaster MSN, MEd and Gary Geis MD. You will need to be an SSH member to read the full article online, but the highlights are shared below:

Abstract

Introduction: In health care simulation, simulation technicians perform multiple tasks to support various educational offerings. Technician responsibilities and the tasks that accompany them seem to vary between centers. The objectives were to identify the range and frequency of tasks that technicians perform and to determine if there is a correspondence between what technicians do and what they feel their responsibilities should be. We hypothesized that there is a core set of responsibilities and tasks for the technician position regardless of background, experience, and type of simulation center.

Methods: We conducted a prospective, survey-based study of individuals currently functioning in a simulation technician role in a simulation center. This survey was designed internally and piloted within 3 academic simulation centers. Potential respondents were identified through a national mailing list, and the survey was distributed electronically during a 3-week period.

Results: A survey request was sent to 280 potential participants, 136 (49%) responded, and 73 met inclusion criteria. Five core tasks were identified as follows: equipment setup and breakdown, programming scenarios into software, operation of software during simulation, audiovisual support for courses, and on-site simulator maintenance. Independent of background before they were hired, technicians felt unprepared for their role once taking the position. Formal training was identified as a need; however, the majority of technicians felt experience over time was the main contributor toward developing knowledge and skills within their role.

Conclusions: This study represents a first step in defining the technician role within simulation-based education and supports the need for the development of a formal job description to allow recruitment, development, and certification.

Congrats to Rachel and the team this is fantastic work!

Read the Full Sim Tech Research Article on the Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare Website


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MEdSim Magazine Advances Patient Safety Through Education and Training

medical simulation journal

Have you heard of MEdSim Magazine yet? MEdSim Magazine aims to promote the best education and training practices for the next generation of healthcare professionals. As a division of the world famous simulation group Halldale Media, the MEdSim professional publication covers topics specific to our world of medical simulation. In the past year I have attended two of Halldale’s simulation events including their new Healthcare Education Assessment Training and Technology (HEATT) meeting and their World Aviation Training & Simulation (WATS) conference, both of which were fantastic learning opportunities. Check out the latest copy below or visit the Halldale website to sign up for past and future editions.

About MEdSim Magazine:

MEdSim Magazine is written by professionals in medicine, simulation and training who are recognized leaders with a lifetime of experience.  MEdSim addresses the needs of medical practitioners, educators, and academicians around the world. MEdSim features innovative healthcare practice: it covers the latest simulations developed to train different medical professionals at different stages of their education and curriculum advancement to highlight the knowledge and skills needed to ensure patient safety and reduce healthcare cost.

Check out the latest edition and sign up to receive your MEdSim Magazine today!

Simulation Team Training Proven to Improve Performance & Patient Safety

Our friends at the LSU Health Center, lead by Dr. John T. Paige, have just concluded a study and published a research article that “found that simulation-based operating room team training of medical and nursing students resulted in more effective teamwork by improving attitudes, behaviors, interaction and overall performance leading to potential increased patient safety and better clinical outcomes.”

simulation improves patient safety research

You may remember Dr. Paige from our Simulab TraumaMan LSU coverage which showcases the medical simulation training his team utilizes.

The information below was pulled from a PR memo off eurekalert.com:

“Effective teamwork in the operating room is often undermined by the ‘silo mentality’ of the differing professions,” says lead author John T. Paige, MD, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery and Director of Applied Surgical Simulation at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine. “Such thinking is formed early in one’s professional experience and is fostered by undergraduate medical and nursing curricula lacking inter-professional education.”

Sixty-six students (18 undergraduate nursing students, 28 fourth-year medical students, and 20 nurse anesthesia students), divided into ten groups, trained over a one-month period at the Russell Klein Center for Advanced Practice at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine. Each two-hour training session used two standardized, authentic scenarios. The first scenario involved a life-threatening intra-abdominal hemorrhage from a stab wound. The second scenario involved local anesthetic toxicity from a regional upper arm block. The scenarios utilized a software algorithm designed to respond to team actions and decisions. At least three faculty instructors facilitated each session. One operated the human patient simulator, and two served as debriefing facilitators. Trained observers rated student team-based behavior.

Each OR team had two medical students (surgeon and first assistant roles), two undergraduate nursing students (circulating and scrub nurse roles), and two nurse anesthesia students (primary and secondary anesthetist roles). Students switched roles within their discipline (e.g., an undergraduate nurse moving from scrub nurse to circulating nurse) for the second scenario. In cases where more than two students from a particular profession were present, two students would participate in the first scenario and the other two would observe. Students then would switch for the second scenario. A structured debriefing followed each scenario.

“Frequently, failed communication, ineffective inter-personal skills, inter-professional tension, poor team interaction and divergent inter-professional interpretations of the quality of collaboration combine to impact both patient care processes and outcomes,” notes John T. Paige, MD, who also serves as Director of the American College of Surgeons Comprehensive Accredited Education Institute at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine.. “In this study, a single session of high fidelity simulation-based inter-professional OR team training resulted in immediate improvement of students’ team-based attitudes and behaviors.” 

Read the entire Press Release here. The study is published online November 1, 2013, in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. Learn more about LSU Health here.

Watch the LSU surgical team in action utilizing medical simulation training products from Simulab.


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