SSH Simulation in Healthcare Journal August 2017 Research Articles Released

medical simulation research journal

The Society for Simulation In Healthcare (SSH) has recently shared their latest Journal publication of “Simulation in Healthcare”, August 2017 – Volume 12 – Issue 4 pp: 207-278 which contains the following peer-reviewed articles:

Empirical Investigations

  • Publication of Abstracts Presented at an International Healthcare Simulation Conference – Cheng, Adam; Lin, Yiqun; Smith, Jeremy; Wan, Brandi; Belanger, Claudia; Hui, Joshua
  • Improved Retention of Chest Compression Psychomotor Skills With Brief “Rolling Refresher” Training – Niles, Dana E.; Nishisaki, Akira; Sutton, Robert M.; Elci, Okan U.; Meaney, Peter A.; O’Connor, Kathleen A.; Leffelman, Jessica; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay
  • Feedback Simulation for Acupressure Training and Skill Assessment – Noll, Eric; Romeiser, Jamie; Shodhan, Shivam; Madariaga, Maria Cecilia; Guo, Xiaojun; Rizwan, Sabeen; Al-Bizri, Ehab; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott
  • Breaking Down the Objective Structured Clinical Examination: An Evaluation of the Helping Babies Breathe OSCEs – Seto, Teresa L.; Tabangin, Meredith E.; Taylor, Kathryn K.; Josyula, Srirama; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D.
  • The Role of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Simulation Training at Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Centers in the United States – Weems, Mark F.; Friedlich, Philippe S.; Nelson, Lara P.; Rake, Alyssa J.; Klee, Laura; Stein, James E.; Stavroudis, Theodora A.

Concepts & Commentary


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  • Serious Gaming in Medical Education: A Proposed Structured Framework for Game Development – Olszewski, Aleksandra E.; Wolbrink, Traci A.
  • Simulation Faculty Development: A Tiered Approach – Peterson, Dawn Taylor; Watts, Penni I.; Epps, Chad A.; White, Marjorie Lee

Economic or Health Policy Articles

  • Simulation-Based Evaluation of the Effects of Patient Load on Mental Workload of Healthcare Staff – Rusnock, Christina F.; Maxheimer, Erich W.; Oyama, Kyle F.; Valencia, Vhance V.

Case Report/Simulation Scenario

  • An Innovative Approach: Using Simulation to Teach Primary Care Gynecologic Procedures – Hellier, Susan D.; Ramponi, Denise R.; Wrynn, Alexander; Garofalo, Stephanie
  • Common Complication of Sickle Cell Disease in a Resource-Constrained Environment: A Simulation Scenario – Binotti, Marco; Genoni, Giulia; Carenzo, Luca; Ferrero, Federica; Bona, Gianni; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi

Read the latest SSH Simulation in Healthcare journal edition here!


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Society for ‘Simulation In Healthcare’ Journal Volume 12 Released

simulation in healthcare journal
Just a brief update today to share that the latest Simulation in Healthcare journal edition Volume 12 – April 2017 – Issue 2 pp: 67-134 from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare has come out with these important articles:
  • Evaluation of a Simpler Tool to Assess Nontechnical Skills During Simulated Critical Events Watkins, Scott C.; Roberts, David A.; Boulet, John R.; McEvoy, Matthew D.; Weinger, Matthew B.
  • Cricothyroidotomy In Situ Simulation Curriculum (CRIC Study): Training Residents for Rare Procedures Petrosoniak, Andrew; Ryzynski, Agnes; Lebovic, Gerald; Woolfrey, Karen
  • The Effect of Force Feedback in a Virtual Learning Environment on the Performance and Satisfaction of Dental Students de Boer, Ilse R.; Lagerweij, Maxim D.; de Vries, Merlijn W.; Wesselink, Paul R.; Vervoorn, Johanna M.
  • Design and Validation of a Three-Dimensional Printed Flexible Canine Otoscopy Teaching Model Nibblett, Belle Marie D.; Pereira, Mary Mauldin; Sithole, Fortune; Orchard, Paul A.D.; Bauman, Eric B.
  • Developing Team Cognition: A Role for Simulation Fernandez, Rosemarie; Shah, Sachita; Rosenman, Elizabeth D.; Kozlowski, Steve W. J.; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Grand, James A.
  • The Effectiveness of Medical Simulation in Teaching Medical Students Critical Care Medicine: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Beal, Matthew David; Kinnear, John; Anderson, Caroline Rachael; Martin, Thomas David; Wamboldt, Rachel; Hooper, Lee Beyond Fidelity: Deconstructing the Seductive Simplicity of Fidelity in Simulator-Based Education in the Health Care Professions Schoenherr, Jordan Richard; Hamstra, Stanley J.
  • Developing a Conversational Virtual Standardized Patient to Enable Students to Practice History-Taking Skills Maicher, Kellen; Danforth, Douglas; Price, Alan; Zimmerman, Laura; Wilcox, Bruce; Liston, Beth; Cronau, Holly; Belknap, Laurie; Ledford, Cynthia; Way, David; Post, Doug; Macerollo, Allison; Rizer, Milisa
  • National Clinical Skills Competition for Medical Students in China Liu, Jing; Jiang, Guanchao; Zhou, Qinghuan; Chen, Hong; Wang, Shan; Wang, Qiming; Chi, Baorong; He, Qingnan; Xiao, Haipeng

SSH Simulation in Healthcare Journal Publishes April Edition on Simulations for Communicable Diseases

healthcare simulation journal

Just received word that the latest issue (April 2016 – Volume 11 – Issue 2) of the Simulation in Healthcare Journal has been published. This journal is connected to the Society in Simulation in Healthcare. Over the next few months we will be reminding you about all the established and new journals out there relevant to those engaging in healthcare simulation. Stay tuned for more! Here is the articles in this issue, which focused on communicable disease Management:

Editorial

  • Introduction to Special Issue on Highly Communicable Disease Management Gaba, David M.
  • Ebola: Urgent Need, Rapid Response Adams, Jennifer J.; Lisco, Steven J.

Highly Communicable Disease Management Theme Issue

  • Health Worker Focused Distributed Simulation for Improving Capability of Health Systems in Liberia Gale, Thomas C. E.; Chatterjee, Arunangsu; Mellor, Nicholas E.; Allan, Richard J.
  • Rapid Development and Deployment of Ebola Readiness Training Across an Academic Health System: The Critical Role of Simulation Education, Consulting, and Systems Integration Phrampus, Paul E.; O’Donnell, John M.; Farkas, Deborah; Abernethy, Denise; Brownlee, Katherine; Dongilli, Thomas; Martin, Susan
  • Simulation as a Tool to Facilitate Practice Changes in Teams Taking Care of Patients Under Investigation for Ebola Virus Disease in Spain Rojo, Elena; Oruña, Clara; Sierra, Dolores; García, Gema; Del Moral, Ignacio; Maestre, Jose M.
  • Use of Simulation to Gauge Preparedness for Ebola at a Free-Standing Children’s Hospital Biddell, Elizabeth A.; Vandersall, Brian L.; Bailes, Stephanie A.; Estephan, Stephanie A.; Ferrara, Lori A.; Nagy, Kristine M.; O’Connell, Joyce L.; Patterson, Mary D.
  • Beating the Spread: Developing a Simulation Analog for Contagious Body Fluids Drew, Jonathan L.; Turner, Joseph; Mugele, Joshua; Hasty, Greg; Duncan, Taylor; Zaiser, Rebekah; Cooper, Dylan
  • Ebola Virus Disease Simulation Case Series: Patient With Ebola Virus Disease in the Prodromal Phase of Illness (Scenario 1), the “Wet” Gastrointestinal Phase of Illness (Scenario 2), and the Late, Critically Ill Phase of Disease (Scenario 3) Delaney, Heather M.; Lucero, Pedro F.; Maves, Ryan C.; Lawler, James V.; Maddry, Joseph K.; Biever, Kimberlie A.; Womble, Shannon G.; Coffman, Robert V.; Murray, Clinton K.

Empirical Investigations

  • Making an “Attitude Adjustment”: Using a Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Education Strategy to Improve Attitudes Toward Teamwork and Communication Wong, Ambrose Hon-Wai; Gang, Maureen; Szyld, Demian; Mahoney, Heather
  • The Correlation of Workplace Simulation-Based Assessments With Interns’ Infant Lumbar Puncture Success: A Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Study Auerbach, Marc; Fein, Daniel M.; Chang, Todd P.; Gerard, James; Zaveri, Pavan; Grossman, Devin; Van Ittersum, Wendy; Rocker, Joshua; Whitfill, Travis; Pusic, Martin; Kessler, David O.; for the INSPIRE LP Investigators Quantitative Feedback Facilitates Acquisition of Skills in Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Skinner, Alisha A.; Freeman, Rosario V.; Sheehan, Florence H.

Technical Report

  • A Hemodynamic Monitor as a Simulation Tool, a Novel Use of the PiCCO2: Technical Description of the Method and Its Application Eghiaian, Alexandre; Lanceleur, Antony; Le Maho, Anne Laure; Pouilly, Arnaud; de Kerlidy, Pierre Meudal; Blondel, Pascal; Suria, Stéphanie; Cerf, Charles

Erratum

Developing a Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Curriculum: Lessons From 11 Years of Advanced Cardiac Life Support: Erratum

Check out the complete Simulation in Healthcare Journal Here!


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Reader Survey for Low Cost Healthcare Simulation Research

medical simulation research survey

An email here from French HealthySim Reader Dr. Martin who is looking for assistance with his healthcare simulation Research. Please download his survey and return it to him at your earliest convenience!

Click here to download his Research Survey.

“Hello HealthySimulation,

I am Frederic MARTIN, French anesthetist physician. I’m currently researching data about low-cost simulation session in order to graduate as a healthcare simulation teacher.

In this investigation, High fidelity simulation means mannequin full of electronic devices like HAL S3201 (Gaumard) or iStan (CAE HealthCare). Moreover, we’ll consider that « low-cost simulation » means « reduced-cost » without losing pedagogical interests.

Thanking you in advance for your participation.

Kind regards,

Dr. Frédéric MARTIN”

Anesthésiste-réanimateur
Hôpitaux privés de Versailles
Clinique des Franciscaines

Email: dr.martin.frederic@gmail.com
Twitter: @drmartinfred

Need help with your medical simulation research? Email us and we’ll help spread the word!

Interesting Medical Simulation Studies & Research Twitter Feed

healthcare simulation research 2014

Some interesting simulation studies have recently been published. Thanks to Tim Willet (@SIMtim_one) for highlighting these and many more research articles for medical simulation! Follow Tim for continuous links to the latest medical simulation research!

Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey. (Qayumi K, Pachev G, Zheng B, Ziv A, Koval V, Badiei S, Cheng A.) – Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

We recommend that educational and health care authorities, as well as accreditation and licensing bodies, support the integration of simulation into health care education for all learner groups. This can be achieved by:

  • Recognizing simulation-based education as a central modality in the maintenance of competencies in health care
  • Setting standards on the expected proficiencies of health care professionals, and identifying how simulation can assist in achieving and maintaining those standards
  • Designing and delivering simulation curriculum for patient safety, professionalism and advocacy-related competencies
  • Encouraging collaboration between and within institutions to promote sharing of existing and new curriculum and expertise.

To promote the growth of simulation-based research on a global scale, we recommend the development of improved opportunities for collaboration and networking. These opportunities will enhance expertise, expand potential for multicenter simulation studies, and further the quality of future simulation-based research. Here, Visit our HealthySimAdmin pages to gain free access to eight administrative sessions.

Central venous access by trainees: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the use of simulation to improve success rate on patients. (Madenci AL, Solis CV, de Moya MA.) – Simulation training for invasive procedures may improve patient safety by enabling efficient training. This study is a meta-analysis with rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria designed to assess the real patient procedural success of simulation training for central venous access. We identified 550 studies, of which 5 (3 randomized controlled trials, 2 prospective 2-group cohort studies) studies of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion were included in the meta-analysis, composed of 407 medical trainees. The simulation group had a significantly larger proportion of trainees who successfully placed CVCs (RR, 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.16, P<0.01). In addition, the simulation group had significantly fewer mean attempts to CVC insertion (weighted mean difference, -1.42; 95% CI, -2.34 to -0.49, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the rate of adverse events between the groups (RR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.19-1.29; P=0.15). CONCLUSIONS: Training programs should consider adopting simulation training for CVC insertion to improve the real patient procedural success of trainees.

Emergency medicine resident crisis resource management ability: a simulation-based longitudinal study. (Clarke S, Horeczko T, Carlisle M, Barton JD, Ng V, Al-Somali S, Bair AE.) – Simulation has been identified as a means of assessing resident physicians’ mastery of technical skills, but there is a lack of evidence for its utility in longitudinal assessments of residents’ non-technical clinical abilities. We evaluated the growth of crisis resource management (CRM) skills in the simulation setting using a validated tool, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (Ottawa GRS). We hypothesized that the Ottawa GRS would reflect progressive growth of CRM ability throughout residency. Ottawa GRS scores increased over time, and the domains of leadership, problem solving, and resource utilization, in particular, were predictive of overall performance. There was a significant gain in all Ottawa GRS components between postgraduate years 1 and 2, but no significant difference in GRS performance between years 2 and 3. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, CRM skills are progressive abilities, and simulation is a useful modality for tracking their development. Modification of this tool may be needed to assess advanced learners’ gains in performance.

From Time-Based to Competency-Based Standards: Core Transitional Competencies in Plastic Surgery. (Lutz K, Yazdani A, Ross D.) – Competency-based medical education is becoming increasingly prevalent and is likely to be mandated by the Royal College in the near future. The objective of this study was to define the core technical competencies that should be possessed by plastic surgery residents as they transition into their senior (presently postgraduate year 3) years of training. Overall, 26 competencies have been identified as “core” for plastic surgery residents to possess as they begin their senior, on-service years. The nature of these skills makes them suitable for teaching in a formal, simulated environment, which would ensure that all plastic surgery trainees are competent in these tasks as they transition to their senior years of residency.


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