INACSL Offers Simulation Fellowship with Support from CAE Healthcare

cae healthcare simulation fellowship inacsl

Furthering the professional development support of simulation champions around the world, the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) organization has partnered with CAE Healthcare to develop a powerful Fellowship training program!

About the Simulation Fellowship Program

This course has been co-developed by INACSL and CAE Healthcare Academy and offers global participants the opportunity to design, facilitate and debrief a Simulated Clinical Experience (SCE) using the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: Simulation for use in all areas of healthcare education.

The Fellowships are designed for new simulation educators, existing simulation educators who need additional support, and directors overseeing a simulation center. The course is experiential and interactive in nature and utilizes seminars, discussion groups, plenary sessions and “hands on” activities to deliver course content. Each Fellowship is a three-part program consisting of webinars, workshops and mentoring. Cohort will consist of no more than 30 participants and three facilitators. Facilitators are simulation experts with five or more years of experience creating and delivering effective simulation education globally.

Each Fellowship is limited to 30 participants and consists of the following elements. Registrations possible for IMSH and INACSL 2017 events covering the below:

Course Details:



  • Length of Course: 8 Months
  • Credits: 26 CEUs
  • Price: $2000 ($250 non-refundable)
Module One:
Introductory Pre-Recorded Webinar
  • Focus on the History of Simulation
  • Introduction to the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: Simulation
  • Overview of the Fellowship

Introductory Live Webinar

  • Cohort Welcome and Introduction/Experiences
  • Expectations for Fellowship
  • Overview of First Workshop Details

Educational Revolution: Two-Day Workshop

  • Introduction to Educational Psychology
  • Implementing the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: Simulation
  • Educational design of simulation activities
  • Creation of your own educational strategy using any form of simulation pedagogy (e.g., Mannequins, SPs etc.)
Module Two: 
How to Communicate to Facilitate Live Webinar
  • Introduction to communication strategies
  • Overview of facilitation, debriefing and evaluation

Immersive Faculty Development

  • Pre-brief, facilitation and debrief strategies
  • Evaluation tools
  • Role-play facilitation and debriefing of your own simulation activity
  • Peer review and feedback
  • Facilitation and debriefing in challenging situations
Module Three:
Mentoring Program: Monthly online activities with designated facilitator and peers of fellowship cohort to include:
  • Professional chat room
  • Case Studies
  • Journal article review
  • Teaching strategies
  • Research methodologies
  • Peer review of facilitation/debriefing
  • Reflective Journaling

Participants are invited to a special fellowship reception to be held during the annual HPSN World and INACSL conferences.

Learn more on the CAE Healthcare website!


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Is This The Reason Healthcare Simulation Isn’t Main Stream?

clinical simulation in nursing

Key Nursing Educators have spoken against the use of simulation for a very bizarre reason. In the latest “Clinical Simulation in Nursing” Journal December 2016 Volume 12, Issue 12, INACSL Journal Editor Suzan “Suzie” Kardong-Edgren explains a major misunderstanding about the use of healthcare simulation.

In the edition, Suzie provides a powerful reminder about the challenges faced for simulation in nursing education, and “what simulation is and how it is evolving”. In my opinion, the laggards of simulation technology adoption will cite any and every reason to reject modern advances in educational practices as the scapegoat for systematic failures. Another must-read commentary by one of our community’s most influential thought leaders entitled “High Fidelity Educators” which you can read here:

“A recent Researchgate citation alert led me to a most interesting editorial by Dean, Williams, and Balnaves (2016) entitled Living dolls and nurses without empathy. The lack of general understanding about what simulation is and how it is evolving, demonstrated in the editorial, provided fodder for thoughtful commentaries from many in the simulation community. This evolving commentary can be found in the blog section of the Journal of Advanced Nursing. It is well worth a read.

It remains very clear that a segment of the nursing education community does not understand that simulation is not about the manikin. However, learner deficits identified during simulation can be easily scapegoated because of the use of simulation. The upshot of the Dean et al. editorial is that nursing students are demonstrating less empathy and that the use of plastic dolls contributes to this. I contend a noted lack of empathy is not new (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010) but that we can clearly see it now during simulation.

Part of the skill set required of a simulation educator is choosing the right kind of simulation (standardized patient, manikin, or task trainer) to accomplish a learning outcome. It is probably not ideal to have a learning outcome of empathy embedded in a manikin-based simulation, but it is certainly possible. Many of us have seen student learners crying at the end of a manikin-based scenario.

Simulation has allowed us to more clearly identify those students who might lean toward a less empathic nature. I might not have noticed a lack of student empathy with a real patient in the past because I, as the faculty member, was there, beside the student and interacting empathetically with a patient, whether the student was capable of doing so or not. In reality, we know our students’ skills and abilities much better after a simulation than we know their abilities within the clinical setting. I became a much more astute educator after seeing my verbally skilled students say some unbelievable things to patients, during simulation.

Working in simulation, one becomes a high-fidelity educator. Admittedly, manikins provide only partial fidelity. The facilitator sets the scene, the mood, observes, diagnoses, and debriefs the scenario. If fidelity is defined as the “degree of accuracy to which a simulation, whether it is physical, mental, or both, represents a given frame of reality in terms of cues and stimuli, and permissible action” (Tun, Alinier, Tang, & Kneebone, 2015 p. 164), it is the educator (facilitator) who orchestrates this fidelity and brings it home, during the debriefing. Students missing opportunities to develop or demonstrate empathetic communication skills can be debriefed in a simulation setting and can try it again, preparing for real patients and families. Arguably, the best clinical educators today are those who work in both simulation and the clinical setting. They are true high-fidelity educators.”

Featured Articles in This Edition:

  • Utilization of the Simulation Environment to Practice Teach-Back With Kidney Transplant Patients – Kara Mangold
  • Acting With a Purpose: The Lived Experience of Actors in the Role of Standardized Patients Portraying Mental Illness – Judith M. Jarosinski, Debra A. Webster
  • Generalizability Theory: An Introduction With Application to Simulation Evaluation – Susan K. Prion, Gregory E. Gilbert, Katie A. Haerling
  • Nursing and Social Work Trauma Simulation: Exploring an Interprofessional Approach – Sara J. Manning, David M. Skiff, Lizette P. Santiago, Andrew Irish
  • Logistical Planning and Making the Move to a New Simulation Space – Jan Barber, Ashley Eberhardt, Brooklyn Kennedy, Suzie Kardong-Edgren
  • Making Sense of Methods and Measurement: Lawshe’s Content Validity Index – Gregory E. Gilbert, Susan Prion

Read the latest edition on the Clinical Simulation in Nursing Website!

INACSL’s Latest Simulation in Nursing Journal Highlights Standardized Patients

nursing simulation journal

Suzie Kardong-Edgren, Director of the RISE Center at Robert Morris University, Drexel Faculty member, and INACSL Simulation in Nursing Journal editor recently shared “Standardized Patients have been a part of health professional education for over 50 years now. As an educational field that continues to grow in scholarship and practice, the editors of Clinical Simulation in Nursing feel the time is right to dedicate a special issue to examining ongoing contributions, share best practices and honour debates within the live simulation field relevant to its practitioners and health professional educators more broadly.”

INACL invites health professionals who are engaging standardized patients (SPs) in simulation education to submit manuscripts for a special issue to be published in July 2017.

Nancy McNaughton, M.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Director, Standardized Patient Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto and Mindi Anderson, PhD, ARNP, CPNP-PC, CNE, CHSE-A, ANEF, University of Central Florida College of Nursing will serve as the guest editors for this special issue.

When submitting manuscripts for this special issue, please select “special issue” when the choices appear.

Clinical Simulation in Nursing is the flagship journal of the International Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning. The journal provides a forum for research, innovation, review, and debate in simulation. The journal is dedicated to the advancement of simulation as an educational strategy to improve patient care. A double blind peer-review process is used for all submissions.

Manuscripts for consideration should be submitted to Clinical Simulation in Nursing (www.nursingsimulation.org) by 15 February, 2017.


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Not Too Late! June INACSL Nursing Simulation Conference June 15th

nursing sim conference

INACSL always puts together a great nursing simulation conference and we can’t wait to hear the report about this year’s annual event taking place June 15-18th in Grapevine Texas. It’s not too late to sign up for this annual event!

Why attend the INACSL Conference:

International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) is nursing’s portal to the world of clinical simulation pedagogy and learning environments. The INACSL conference is the leading forum for nurse educators (academic and clinical), managers and researchers to connect in person with their community of practice for simulation.

The annual conference is the ideal environment to gain current knowledge regarding the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: Simulation, patient care skill acquisition, simulation lab management and the latest methodologies using simulation to enhance the education of trainees and/or practitioners. The annual conference provides an opportunity to network and share knowledge and skills to further the science of simulation alongside simulation leaders, educators, researchers and industry partners from around the world.

  • Experience the newest innovations in nursing simulation and learning resources while you re-visit some tried-and-true methodologies.
  • Explore future simulation opportunities using EvidenceBased Practice.
  • Determine new directions for simulation and learning resource centers.
  • Explore strategies to integrate technology into curriculum and practice.
  • Examine the challenges of managing nursing simulation/ learning resource centers. • Network with colleagues and experts.

Learn more at the INACSL 2016 Event website today!

CAE Healthcare Increases Simulation Support With Upcoming Free Webinars

cae healthcare

Recently I learned that CAE Healthcare has partnered with INACSL and provided webinar overviewing a new educational opportunity in the form of a Healthcare Simulation Fellowship co-developed by both groups. The fellowship is designed for new simulation educators, existing simulation educators who need additional support, and directors overseeing a simulation center and offers participants the opportunity to design, facilitate and debrief a Simulated Clinical Experience (SCE) using the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: SimulationSM for use in all areas of healthcare education. While that first webinar has passed I assume there will be more in the near future. In the meantime, check out these other great webinar opportunities from CAE Healthcare regarding their A/V systems:

About the Series:

Have you wondered if CAE Healthcare LearningSpace, Replay or Vïvo would be right for your simulation programs? We are pleased to offer introductory webinars on three products followed by open Q & A sessions. The webinars are free with no obligation to purchase. Please note: All webinars will be in English only. All times are EDT (GMT-4:00).

CAE Vïvo for METIman – October 21, 2015 

Join our free webinar on October 21st to learn why simulation users are joining the Vïvo revolution. Vïvo is a user-friendly platform that allows you to operate METIman within minutes of picking up the tablet. With Vïvo, you have complete control over your patient and his physiology.

CAE LearningSpace – October 22 & 28, 2015 

Join CAE Healthcare and audiovisual solutions gurus, Jake Halbert and Michelle Castleberry, in this free webinar event. LearningSpace is CAE Healthcare’s comprehensive audiovisual and center management system. Designed to connect your simulation-based learning environment with the leading management and performance assessment tools for healthcare education, LearningSpace integrates with most simulators (including Laerdal and Gaumard), skills trainers and Standardized Patient programs to help manage all aspects of healthcare learning.

You’ll learn about:

  • Why to choose LearningSpace over other systems
  • Recording and Debriefing capabilities
  • Evaluation and Reporting features
  • Scheduling, Room Booking, and Resource Management functionality
  • The different hardware configurations designed to fit your simulation center

CAE Replay – October 29, 2015

Join CAE Healthcare and audiovisual solutions guru, Matt Wittman, in a free webinar event focused on exploring the many benefits and uses of the CAE Replay AV recording and playback system for getting the most out of medical simulation debriefing sessions.

Replay’s always-on option ensures every action gets recorded and structures all visual and audio content into easily accessible “chapters” for simple replay and review. Replay stores audio, video, patient data and real-time annotations, allowing users to return to any part of a past session or simulation event to review it in part or in its entirety, however many times they wish.

You’ll learn about:

  • How to implement Replay
  • Replay’s stunning HD audiovisual and back-end hardware
  • Advanced Google search features & cloud-based backups
  • Scalability (from 2 up to 200 cameras)
  • Simple installation and easy operation

Register for these Free CAE Healthcare Webinars Here 

INACSL “Debra Spunt” Research Grant Sponsored by Laerdal Call For Proposals Ends Soon

Reminder today for INACSL members that Wednesday September 16th is the deadline for submitting your mini-grant research proposal! The grants are made possible by the support of Laerdal.

inacsl research grant

About the Grant:

The International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning invites proposals to conduct investigations on issues relevant to nursing simulation. The INACSL “Debra Spunt” Research Grant program is designed to encourage growth and development of novice researchers among the INACSL membership. Priority will be given to new grant applicants. Two annual competitive reviews will result in the awarding of two grants of $1000 each. The goal is to fund research that advances the science of simulation in healthcare and is related to at least one INACL research priority.  Rigorously designed research proposals, both qualitative and quantitative are welcome.  Proposals must target one of the following research priorities:

  • Translational research
  • Evaluation methods
  • Validity and reliability of instruments
  • Ratio of clinical time to simulation time
  • Prebriefing and briefing
  • Use of theory in simulation
  • Measurement of higher order thinking (e.g. clinical reasoning)
  • Faculty development
  • Facilitator competence
  • Communication

Preference will be given to research projects that are a part of a multi-site study.  Research projects that measure student satisfaction and/or self confidence must couple those outcome measures with one of the research priorities listed above.

The International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning invites proposal submissions to conduct investigations on issues relevant in Nursing Practice and Nursing Education.  Our goal is to fund research on a variety of issues related to simulation and other areas of member interest.

To see past grant recipients, and learn how to apply, simply
Visit the INACSL website today!

http://www.inacsl.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3293

 

Special Call for Manuscripts – Use of Games as Simulation and Gaming Theory in Simulation

nursing simulation journal

The official INACSL journal: Clinical Simulation in Nursing has a special issue call out for Manuscripts on the “Use of Games as Simulation and Gaming Theory in Simulation”.

We invite health professionals who are exploring the application of gaming theory to simulation and/or using gaming simulation for teaching or evaluation to submit manuscripts for a special issue to be published in January 2016. Eric Bauman PhD, RN and Nicole Harder PhD, RN will serve as the guest editors for this special issue, to be published in January 2016. Manuscripts for consideration should be submitted to Clinical Simulation in Nursing by 1 October, 2015.

When submitting manuscripts for this special issue, please select “special issue” when Clinical Simulation in Nursing is the flagship journal of the International Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning. The journal provides a forum for research, innovation, review, and debate in simulation. The journal is dedicated to the advancement of simulation as an educational strategy to improve patient care. A double blind peer-review process is used for all submissions.

You can submit at: http://ees.elsevier.com/nursingsimulation/

 

Reminder to Nursing Simulation Champions: INACSL 2015 June in Atlanta

inacsl 2015

Calling all Nursing Simulation Champions! Reminder that the 14th annual INACSL simulation conference is taking place June 10th-13th in Atlanta Georgia. You can download the full event brochure here. Of course, all professional simulationists are encouraged to attend.

Why attend the INACSL Conference:

International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) is nursing’s portal to the world of clinical simulation pedagogy and learning environments. The INACSL conference is the leading forum for nurse educators (academic and clinical), managers and researches to connect in person with their community of practice for simulation. The annual conference is the ideal environment to gain current knowledge regarding the Standards of Best Practice: Simulation, patient care skill acquisition, simulation lab management and the latest methodologies using simulation to enhance the education of trainees and or practitioners. The annual conference provides an opportunity to network and share knowledge and skills to further the science of simulation alongside simulation leaders, educators, researchers and industry partners from around the world.

INACSL Objectives:

  • Experience the newest innovations in nursing simulation and/ learning resources while you re-visit some tried-and-true methodologies.
  • Explore future simulation opportunities using Evidence-Based Practice.
  • Determine new directions for simulation and learning resource centers.
  • Explore strategies to integrate technology into curriculum and practice.
  • Examine the challenges of managing nursing simulation/ learning resource centers.
  • Network with colleagues and experts.

Opening Keynote Address “Importance of Structured Debriefing” will be by Jenny Rudolph, PhD of Harvard Medical School’s Center for Medical Simulation.

Learn more and register now for INACSL 2015!

“New Validation for Simulation Education” ANA Article from INACSL VP Lori Lioce

american nurse simulation

A recent article on the American Nurse by Lori Lioce Clinical Associate Professor & Simulation Coordinator at the University of Alabama Huntsville entitled “New Validation for Simulation Education” covers the continued evolution of healthcare simulation, the recent NCSBN landmark research study results, and the INACSL standards — all of which are helping to support the increase of medical simulation in healthcare education. Lori is also a Family Nurse Practitioner, Vice President of operations for INACSL and a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator. Below is some excerpts of this must-read article:

Technology and improved teaching and learning strategies are changing education as we knew it. A 2013 review conducted by David Cook of more than 1,000 individual studies with more than 50,000 participants revealed that “technology-enhanced simulation is consistently associated with large, statistically significant benefits in the areas of knowledge, skills and behaviors.” And “for direct patient effects, such as major complications, mortality, or length of stay, the benefits are smaller but still significant.” These findings, published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, underscore what many nursing educators and students have experienced firsthand.

Keys to successful simulation training experiences

loriHealth care simulation is used in a variety of settings for student and employee orientation, physiologic assessment, deliberate practice, on-demand clinical experiences, reflective exploration, competency validation, communication and teamwork development, remediation, and high-stakes testing. The beauty of simulation-enhanced learning is that it uniquely and deliberately allows participants to make mistakes at the bedside in a controlled environment with no risk to a patient. Health care simulation shouldn’t replace all clinical experiences. However, specific and purposeful integration of simulation can be an incredible process to witness. Further, the subsequent debriefing, whether at the bedside or in a formal debriefing room, allows participants and peers to safely discuss competent practice, rehearse peer-to-peer communication, identify and correct errors and explore the implications for patients, apply clinical practice protocols, and examine clinical reasoning with a knowledgeable facilitator. Personally, I enjoy seeing the “light go on” in the face of the participants when they really “get it.” The rapid discussion of how they made the connection from their reading or didactic education to clinical application is the key. They are excited, and it is contagious. That’s when I know we have had a positive experience.

Successful simulation requires planning and practice. A programmatic framework with specific steps is essential to support successful repeatable outcomes. The process may include a theoretical framework, orientation to the simulator, an explanation of the facilitator and participant roles and expectations, and preselection of specific achievable and measurable objectives. Participants should understand this process. The participant should lead and be empowered through pre- and post-briefing to achieve true change in practice through discovery learning.

Often administrators, staff, novice facilitators, course managers, clinicians and even participants may underestimate the preparation needed. In the educational environment, where you may have multiple groups repeating the same simulation, I am an advocate for a simulation expert and facilitator-led “dry run” of all simulations before implementation with participants. The dry run without participants allows the facilitator to see the experience from the participants’ perspective and ensures selection of a pre- and post-simulation process, especially when there are different facilitators within a course for each clinical group. This deliberate planning provides a vital opportunity for selection of learning preparation assignments, didactic coordination, review of and emphasis on objectives, coordination of vital equipment and medications, altering of the scenario, and agreement on a scenario stopping point. Most important, it verifies the presence of all physical and verbal cues that enable the participants to follow the clinical reasoning. Without these, simulation may not be aspirational or improve patient outcomes. Several vital components of a successful simulation learning program are dedicated simulation staff, effective coordination and scheduling, and an experienced debriefer — one who can guide the participants in discovery learning and not steal the “aha” moment. In fact, once a facilitator sees that light come on for the participants, he or she may never want to lecture again.

National and state regulation

Be aware that rules and regulations are being considered in various states regarding the use of simulation. In fact, in June 2013, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) completed data collection for a three-year multisite study on the use of simulation in prelicensure programs. The results are being released Aug. 13 at the NCSBN annual meeting in Chicago. I encourage you to periodically check with your state boards for specific updates.

Standards for best practice

With the rapid expansion in the field of health care simulation, standards for best practice have become increasingly important for quality, consistency, outcomes, and improvement of simulation programs and learning strategies.

In 2011, the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) published the seminal work Standards of Best Practice: Simulation. This document includes seven standards, and each standard includes specific criteria, outcomes and rationales. The standards provide a vital framework for decreasing clinical variability, planning strategically, initiating research and providing faculty development.

Four new standards, identified in 2013, are currently being prepared for publication in 2015 to address simulation design, research, standardized patients and interprofessional education.

Read Lori’s Full Article here on The ANA Website and order a copy of the Standards of Best Practice: Simulation at www.inacsl.org.

Drexel University Master of Science in Medical Simulation at INACSL & Sim Summit – Now Enrolling!

master of medical simulation

Interested in obtaining a Masters Degree in Healthcare Simulation?

Drexel University College of Medicine’s Master of Science in Medical and Healthcare Simulation Program currently has a booth at the INACSL event in Orlando, providing a coffee break tomorrow. The program is actively enrolling students and is still accepting applications for Fall 2014.

About the Program:

The Master of Science in Medical and Healthcare Simulation (MSMS) program is a unique, two year program which is the first of its kind to offer advanced training in simulation teaching, curriculum design, and the fundamentals of simulation research. This degree program will prepare the student for an academic career in medical simulation via quality effective simulation based healthcare education, research, management, leadership and teamwork skills. The blended instructional approach consists of primarily online coursework combined with three, week long on-campus immersive simulation practicums.

The goal of this program is to provide the scientific and educational foundation to expose and prepare graduatelevel students with background training in healthcare for a transition into an enduring productive educational and research career in simulation. This program is intended for individuals with prior training and/or experience in healthcare to provide a much broader base of education in simulation based medical education than currently exists in one format anywhere else in the country.

Faculty in the MSMS program will be from interprofessional simulation experts from within Drexel University’s School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions, the iSchool and the College of Medicine. In addition, there are also individuals from a variety of healthcare professions and educators locally and nationally who will teach as instructors. The Master of Science Degree in Medical and Healthcare Simulation (MSMS) will provide students with a core, detailed focus on the many facets of simulation based medical education while simultaneously providing those students with multiple options to pursue related areas of interest upon graduation.

Faculty from the Drexel Med program includes leading experts from our field of medical simulation:

Sharon Griswold-Theodorson, MD, MPH, a board-certified emergency medicine physician. Her interests include how the implementation of simulated clinical experiences can improve health care education, clinical patient outcomes & #patient safety. Learn more here.

Suzan Kardong-Edgren, PhD, RN, ANEF, CHSE – Suzan is an internationally known thought leader & sought-after speaker in simulation. She received the highest honor in nursing education for simulation from the National League for Nursing in 2010 and serves as a consultant on the landmark National Simulation Study. Learn more here.

D. Scott Lind, MD – Scott is the chair of the Dept. of Surgery. He has pursued clinical interests in breast cancer & melanoma, & educational topics, particularly the use of simulation in medical education. He has published more than 130 papers & book chapters & has given more than 100 regional & national presentations. More click here.

Roberta L. Hales MHA, RRT-NPS, RN – Roberta is a simulation educator at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia where she is involved in program development, scenario design & simulation facilitator training. She has lectured on pediatric simulation education at the local, state, national & international level. For more, click here.

Komal Bajaj, MD – Komal is a member of the faculty at the Institute for Medical Simulation & Advanced Learning (IMSAL) & an assistant professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Her simulation interests include in-situ drills, debriefing complex clinical scenarios & ultrasound based simulation. Click for more.

Kymberlee Elles-Montgomery, DrNP, CRNP-BC, CNE – Kymberlee specializes in interprofessional education initiatives that foster communication & collaboration across disciplines to improve patient safety, quality of care & decrease medical errors. She is board certified as a women’s health nurse practitioner. Click for more.

Jami Smith, MPA, Med, PA-C – Jami is not only the academic director but also a simulation educator. She has experience as an assistant professor & academic coordinator, & as an emergency medicine physician assistant. Her research focuses on the use of simulation to incorporate active learning strategies into graduate and post-graduate levels. More here.

If you are not at the INACSL nursing simulation event, the Sim Division of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Drexel University College of Medicine will be presenting workshops and posters at the Canadian Simulation Summit in Toronto in September.

Check out the Drexel Med Facebook Page to see the latest and the Drexel Med MSMS website page to learn more!