CAE Healthcare Supports Development of Simulation Impact Tool with Leeds Beckett

Nurse academic works on tool to measure student learning

Nursing Times recently covered how CAE Healthacre is supporting the development of a tool that calculates the impact of a student’s simulated encounter with a patient with UK based Leeds Beckett University!

Ann Sunderland, director of clinical skills and simulation at Leeds Beckett University, has been selected to work with Canadian Aviation Electronics (CAE) Healthcare to develop a tool that calculates the impact of a student’s simulated encounter with a patient.

The project, Patient Impact Scoring, will build on Ms Sunderland’s PhD research, which centers around the impact of simulation-based education on patient outcomes. CAE Healthcare’s existing system in the university’s clinical skills suite is equipped with 13 cameras, including four mobile cameras, that allows educators to assess activity. Ms Sunderland will compare the effects on patient outcomes in relation to both simulation-based and scheduled learning activities in postgraduate students.



She will then work with CAE Healthcare programming experts in the US to develop a tool for calculating a score that reflects the overall impact of the student’s encounter with a patient – either a lifelike mannequin or simulated patient – during a simulated scenario.

Ms Sunderland, a nurse by background, said: “Simulation has become firmly embedded in healthcare education over the last few decades as there is overwhelming evidence to support its effectiveness. “Simulation-based education offers targeted learning experiences where knowledge, skills and attitudes can be learned and refined within a safe and supportive environment,” she noted. “The ability to replicate specific clinical scenarios with immersive and interactive participation from learners – both individuals and teams – is a powerful tool with which to enhance technical and non-technical skills, as well as being a useful method of assessment,” she said.


Sponsored Advertisement:


Complete Administrator’s Guide To Healthcare Simulation ‘HealthySimAdmin’ Program Series Now Available for Free!

healthysimadmin

Sim champs HealthySimulation.com is welcoming 2017 with a bang by recapping for you here ALL eight HealthySimAdmin videos! Each of these 2 hour recorded sessions provides key administrative insights by an entire panel of leading healthcare simulation program directors! Sponsored by Laerdal, B-Line Medical, and Pocket Nurse, the original value of watching the program online was $450, but now the entire program is available to watch for free online!

HealthySimAdmin was the world’s first broadcasted event providing an open and online discussion to share administrative solutions for the “how to” of medical simulation. Hundreds of simulation program administrators from around the world have watched the HealthySimAdmin panel of sim lab management experts from hospital, military, community college and university nursing programs, medical schools, EMS providers as well as medical simulation consultant groups to cover eight community-selected topics which included: Collaborative simulation program development, Funding sources & models, Faculty/educator buy-in, Research coordination, Daily operations, IT issues & support, Increasing utilization & Business development!

medical simulation consulting

Watch this highlight to preview some of the thousands of administrative tips to be gained from HealthySimAdmin:

Learn what other sim lab administrators are saying about HealthySimAdmin:

Each of the following sessions starts with a 40 minute presentation by the associated key speaker which is then followed by 60 minutes of discussion and Q&A session by the entire expert panel:

Part 1: “Collaborative Simulation Program Development” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN

Part 2: “Funding Sources & Models” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN & COL (Ret) John McManus, MD, MCR

Part 3: “Clinical Educator Training & Buy-in” – Jane Kleinman RN, MAOM

Part 4: “Sim Research Development” – Amar Pravin Patel, MS, NREMT-P, CFC

Part 5: “Maximizing Daily Operations” – Henry Henao MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC, EMT

Part 6: “IT Structures & Issues” – James Cypert BAP, BAIT, MCSE, MCT, MCP

Part 7: “Increasing Sim Program Utilization” – Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D.

Part 8: “Business Development & Revenue Generation” – Lance Baily, HealthySimAdmin Organizer

Complete Session Details are available on those pages. Reasons to Watch HealthySimAdmin, NOW TOTALLY FREE:

  • Expand your knowledge by learning from a diverse group of sim admins
    The HealthySimAdmin panel of experts is comprised of successful simulation program administrators from a variety of settings including: community, state and university nursing schools, medical schools, EMS programs, hospitals, IT departments, and the military. Additional panel members will include leading industry consultants who have designed and managed sim labs around the globe. HealthySimAdmin will not only share “proven-to-work” techniques from others in your field but also provide an expanded perspective from others that utilize medical simulation within healthcare.
  • Learn from your new professional community
    Currently there are no professional degrees in medical simulation program management. Simulation program administrators have varied experience which may include successful or maybe, not so successful, strategies for managing a simulation center/lab. For example, a sim lab program manager with an IT background will have little trouble integrating their center’s network technology, but may find clinical educator training and buy-in much more challenging. In that sense, our growing international community is the best resource we have for learning and sharing the best practices in each of the numerous facets necessary to operate a simulation lab. HealthySimAdmin’s mission is to create a global and shared community online space where healthcare simulation program administrators can find and share information unique to medical simulation management.
  • Participate from anywhere in the world
    What happened in Vegas did not stay in Vegas with HealthySimAdmin! With any high-speed internet connection you will be able to watch HealthySimAdmin wherever you are. Join an international audience of healthcare simulation managers who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and gain global insight into the operations and development of a successful medical simulation program.
  • Maximize your time with medical simulation admin specific content
    While the methodology of simulation in healthcare continues to expand exponentially across the globe, the discussions regarding the operations and management of this technology are relatively new. And while other medical simulation-based meetings do exist, they primarily serve our community’s clinical educators. Thus, resources and guidance for program administrators remains limited. To address this challenge, HealthySimAdmin held an event specifically designed to meet the needs of healthcare simulation program administrators. Catch up to the hundreds of other administrators who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and maximize your time and resources by engaging with content that is as unique as your profession!

Sign Up for HealthySimulation.com’s Free Email Newsletter for more Great Content!

Increasing Medical Simulation Program Utilization – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 7

healthcare simulation management

HealthySimAdmin was the world’s first broadcasted event providing an open and online discussion to share administrative solutions for the “how to” of medical simulation. During the live taping, more than 105 simulation program administrators from around the world participated in-person or online with the HealthySimAdmin panel of sim lab management experts from hospital, military, community college and university nursing programs, medical schools, EMS providers as well as medical simulation consultant groups to cover eight community-selected topics which included: Collaborative simulation program development, Funding sources & models, Faculty/educator buy-in, Research coordination, Daily operations, IT issues & support, Increasing utilization & Business development!

“Increasing Utilization”: How do you convince higher administration that your medical simulation program deserves additional funding, space, equipment and staff? How do you continue to increase services without frustrating staff or denying simulation champions? Allen Giannakopoulos, PhD shares with us how to expand simulation beyond the original scope of the program considering needs such as space, scheduling complications, financial support, technology issues, hiring new staff and more. Allen will then be joined by the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts to discuss how to increase usage in your simulation program, track and analyze statistical data to help gain additional support, modifying and transforming scheduling and procedural policies, overcoming resistance to program evolution as well as the differences in strategy necessary for short vs. long-term simulation program expansion. Audience question and answer period to follow lecture and panel discussion. With this session we will learn how to successfully grow a medical simulation lab program through various stages of development.

Session Presentation Lead By:

Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D.
Corporate Director, Baptist Health South Florida

Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D. is the Corporate Director for Reengineering and Redesign at Baptist Health South Florida in Miami, Florida. His duties include computer simulation of processes and scheduled events in clinical and business departments.  Dr. Giannakopoulos earned his academic credentials from the State University of New York in Brockport, BS in Business; University of Rochester, MBA in Business and Marketing; and his Ph.D. in Health Administration from Kennedy –Western in Sacramento.Dr. Giannakopoulos been published in over 50 health care journals and publications and has been a featured speaker and presenter over the past twenty years in health care, quality improvement, and simulation.Dr. Giannakopoulos has been working with computer modeling and simulations since the 1990’s, when basic tools were created.  Today, the most advanced computer simulation tools are used to mimic clinical processes and provide clinicians with information on how to view the patient experience as a whole, in addition to analyzing specific parts. Dr. Giannakopoulos worked with SSiH to survey members on their experiences in order to ascertain what the best practices are in creating, building, and sustaining a simulation center. This body of knowledge continues to be built for the benefit of organizations that are looking to construct their simulation center.

Subscribe to HealthySim’s Free Monthly Newsletter to See All the HealthySimAdmin Sessions Now!


Supported Organization:


The Newest Medical Simulation Center Designs May Surprise You!

designing a sim center

Looking for inspiration for your new sim center? Check out these four new simulation buildings, including a very innovative design from Columbia University:

1) The Vagelos Education Center, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler (as Executive Architect), is a new medical and graduate education building at Columbia University’s Medical Center. The building’s design—which weaves together state-of-the-art medical simulation clinics and labs, tech-enabled classrooms, communal areas for study and socializing, and event spaces—reflects how medicine is taught, learned, and practiced in the 21st century.

Learn more about the Vagelos Education Center at Columbia University

2) The Stephen F. Austin State University Richard and Lucille Dewitt School of nursing is one of only three facilities in Texas that has an onsite simulation lab: The Ed and Gwen Cole Simulation Laboratory, a Laerdal Center of Educational Excellence. The simulation lab is 9,000 square feet with a 10-bed medical surgical area, labor and delivery area, nursery and neonatal area, health assessment lab and an emergency room area. Real medical equipment like IV pumps and crash carts add to the reality of the simulation lab. “It’s a bridge between what we teach the students in class and actual clinical, face-to-face, live humans,” David Smith, coordinator of the simulation lab and clinical instructor, said. “It gives the students a chance to put into practice what they’re learning in class in a risk-free environment.”

Learn more about the new Austin State Sim Lab

3) Hibbing Community College: Over the past three years, Hibbing Community College has developed their new hi-tech Healthcare Simulation Center. They have three rooms that include two clinic bays, an OB and ICU unit, a homecare area, and an infectious control setup. “It’s just cutting edge. It’s preparing students for future practice and it’s real life right in front of them,” said the Director of Nursing, Sandy Gustafson. The health center features high-fidelity mannequins that breathe, have pulses and heart tones, and one even simulates child birth. Students get the hands-on experience they wouldn’t get just by watching in a real hospital setting.

Learn more about the Hibbing Community College Sim Center

4) St. Clair County Community College: The students were working in the newly renovated health simulation labs in the AJ Theisen Building. The renovation is the result of a $350,000 project that combined older medical and surgical simulation equipment with new tools and moved them to the annex of the Theisen Building. Having students work in simulation labs, in which the verbal manikin have pulses and students can hear their hearts and lungs, is not exactly a new concept for SC4 — they have been doing this for the past six years. However, the old simulation lab was in the basement of the Clara E. Mackenzie Building and in a less realistic setting.

Learn more about the St. Clair County Simulation Building

7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 1

growing a simulation program

This month we have been covering key business considerations your simulation teams needs to have in place to build or expand your program. Previous articles in this series include the “Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget” and “3 Key Resources to Expand Your simulation Program“.

In today’s article I share how as the Director of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas, I was able to secure $250,000 in external business contracts in just two years. These additional funds helped the center hire additional staff and purchases new equipment. So, note that although this article focuses on external contracts, a lost of the materials presented here will also help you expand your simulation services to internal departments within your institution.

The discussion focuses on 7 key areas necessary to create a successful sales funnel for your simulation services, the first 3 of which we will cover today:

  1. Gaining support
  2. Building a program
  3. Seizing opportunities
  4. Marketing yourself
  5. Providing quality services
  6. Securing feedback
  7. Perfecting systems.

1. Gain Support

Before building an external simulation program, I knew I would need to gain the support of the executive leadership of our department to spend time and energy focusing on clients outside our internal stakeholders. At the CSCLV this leadership was the Deans of the collaborative schools sharing the space (all of whom were under the roof of the Nevada System of Higher Education UNLV, NSC, and UNSOM).

After our first year of utilization I was able to show the deans that our center’s spaces were not being utilized during many nights and weekends. This was followed up by the reminder of an opportunity to “rent” those spaces to groups that may be interested in training healthcare learners or being in a healthcare looking facility without actual patients. The deans agreed that an exploration of external business development could help to cover the costs not only for the staff time needed to manage those engagements, but additional staff time to help our own programs and also pay for new equipment in the future when needed.

The deans reminded me that I would need to get permission for a special account from the State system to take in revenue, and that I would need to generate a contract template for external users to protect the center — one that included a demand for proof of insurance by the external programs to cover any accidents. Following this I met with the Center’s legal support out of UNLV to address all of these concerns in-order to get the final sign off on starting an external program.

2. Build a Program

The most important thing to remember when starting the development of a new simulation program, internal or external, is to start small. By creating a successful program that is manageable and repeatable, your team can “rinse and repeat” on cruise control while reserving development energies for bigger projects. Remember that teams fatigue by new information, new processes, new technologies, and new systems. By aiming too high in the beginning, we risk exhausting ourselves and our programs. With a smaller program, we can be sure not to extend our resources too far too quickly and burn out. Remember, the longterm success of the program is the goal — and smaller steps will help us to build upon our achievements and ultimately move farther, faster.

This mindset helped our team pick our first external client, the ATLS course from the County Hospital next door. The group was looking for a new host to provide the space for the training, and store the materials necessary for the courses. Their educators would provide the training, and the local marketing. Our team would store their equipment, provide them space, provide additional marketing, and secure a small fee for our work.

This 2-day smaller program enabled our team to work through hundreds of issues that came up without overwhelming us from our “8 to 5” work for internal users of our simulation program. Items like catering, collecting payments, scheduling, contracts, and security concerns were addressed during the 2 months leading up to the first event. How we would deal with parking and directions to the room itself needed to be considered! Profits from this program were small at just about $1500 per weekend event.

Obviously we learned a great deal from the first program at the Center which we incorporated in future events (more on this later). The important thing to note here is that following this course we could now handle bigger, longer, and more expensive programs for external clients. Following this we launched simulation based training courses in partnership with an external consultant that lasted 4-5 days and required a great deal more support by our team for simulation experiences, marketing, and administration. Profits from these events increased to about $6,000 per event.

Following the successful completion of several such trainings, we were ready for multi-week programs with local hospitals and private schools that ended up generating $50,000+ contracts. Had we started from nothing to this high level of service I am sure we would have failed to provide high quality programs which are necessary to ensure supporting long-term relationships and positive testimonials, while minimizing staff stress levels.

3. Seize Opportunities

Consider what makes your simulation program special? What services can your team, center, program provide that internal stakeholders or external clients may need? Think small and think big: what local groups could benefit from ongoing long-term training engagements and what international groups would visit your center for one-off specialized training programs? What equipment does your program already have access to which is rare? Are you located in a travel destination?

The CSCLV is located in Las Vegas, which means that it can attract individuals from around the world that are interested in gaining necessary CEUs/CMUs while traveling to a fun location. What unique opportunities does your equipment, faculty, program, and city offer to potential clients?

Another benefit of Las Vegas is its close proximity to Hollywood, which helped Our Sim Center Have Its Most Profitable Day Ever. Production companies will pay big bucks to rent facilities that look like clinical locations but that don’t have real patients to worry about.

Knowing what you can offer local, regional, national, and international clients will enable you to identify and build programs which will speak to and attract new business to your program.

Are you interested in a deeper dive into these topics?

Check out the 8 recorded sessions from the HealthySimAdmin event for free after Subscribing to the HealthySim Monthly Newsletter!

*Update: Part 2 of this article series is now available, which provides us with 4 more insights necessary to grow your simulation program: Marketing, Delivery, Feedback and Growth!

Save $200 on WISER’s October iSIM Course to Improve Simulation Instructional Methods

simulation instructional training course

Save $200 on the October iSIM course provided at the UPMC WISER Center with this special HealthySim discount code!

Improving Simulation Instructional Methods Assessment, Debriefing, Comprehensive, and Development are just a few words that describe WISER’s iSIM Improving Simulation Instructional Methods (iSIM) course.

iSIM is a three (3)-day immersive program designed to cover the fundamental skills for the creation and delivery of high quality simulation-based healthcare education through a variety of techniques and technologies while emphasizing hands-on learning through active participation.

The program is intended for healthcare professionals and educators who are interested in improving their instructional skills. Each participant will engage in an interactive experience and gain knowledge and skills to enhance their ability to design and conduct simulation-based learning and assessment activities.

The course has been designed and is actively facilitated by internationally renowned experts in simulation and faculty development from WISER at The University of Pittsburgh, and The Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education at the University of Miami. This course will prepare educators to enhance their skills using simulation methods. The iSIM course is held at WISER in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania three times a year.

Register now for the next available iSIM course in October and save $200 by using the discount code (WISER!).

Visit the WISER website to learn more & enroll today!

The Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget

how to start using healthcare simulation

This summer I had two fantastic engagements that focused on helping simulation champions increase their program, by gaining additional financial support through considering the language of sales when dealing with administrators.

First was at the Global Network for Simulation in Healthcare meeting in Oxford last month which continued the work started by previous participants to identify and create a tool set for helping simulation champions convey the opportunities of simulation to administrators. Look out for industry-changing content from this group in the next twenty-four months.

The second was at the amazing SimulationIQ Platinum Sponsored SimGHOSTS 2016 USA event, during the SimNEXT sponsored keynote address by Jump Trading Simulation Center’s Director and CMO Dr. John Vozenilek, who demonstrated how their simulation program was seen as a cost-reduction center for the OSF Healthcare hospital.

While this conversation is not new to the world of healthcare simulation, in fact we covered it extensively in 2012 during the HealthySimAdmin event which you can watch here, the conversation has definitely evolved to become a primary concern of simulation program directors and industry partners around the world.

To grow your simulation program, the concept is simple:

To increase your simulation program you will need increased financial and institutional resources, and to do that, you need to gain the support of the highest level administrators possible from your organization. So how do you successful start and maintain that conversation with institutional leadership so they become as impassioned about simulation as you are? As clinicians, researchers, educators, administrators, and technology specialists, we may not have the learned the tools necessary to convey this message in a way that can be heard by the other side.

As a documentary film-maker I learned at an early age that I need to craft my message in a way that can be understood by the audience. If they cannot understand parts of my message, or they are missing context, or don’t have a chance to build the right frame of mind — then my efforts would not translate into the understanding the audience was willing to consume. When it comes to marketing, the first thing I read was that “no one cares about your problems, they only care about their own”.

In that reality, we need to start our campaign to increase simulation not from our perspective, but from the perspective of the highest level administrators we will need to participate in-order to move the program forward in a big way. The question then becomes: What are their priorities, their needs, and most importantly their problems? Usually, the priorities in healthcare education are for maximum learner pass rates and in professional healthcare for increased quality of care with minimal costs. BOTH groups usually share the same primary problem: finances.

With this knowledge we can begin to speak to organizational leadership within the right frame to capture their attention, provide solutions, and create big wins.

Well as healthcare simulation champions we are comfortable with learning a new language, of being early-adopters and challenging the status quo with innovative practices, equipment and programs. We too must also challenge ourselves to also learn the “language of sales” to help those around us see what we see: that simulation improves efficiency and quality, while ultimately reducing costs.

Each week over the next month I will share a book, website, movie, or other resource that can you speak this “language of sales” in an effort to increase your opportunity to expand your simulation program. Topics will include why and how to craft “an elevator pitch”, how to identify key stakeholders and their priorities, sales messaging, and relationship building.

Don’t miss must-read articles by
Subscribing to our free monthly email newsletter!

April 27th Webinar: Advancing Your Simulation Technology Specialist Career – 1PM PST, 6PM UTC

simghosts-logo

SimGHOSTS, the organization specifically dedicated to supporting those operating healthcare simulation technologies just announced an upcoming webinar​!

What: “Advancing Your Simulation Technology Specialist Career” with Jeremiah Avarana M.Engr, M.Ed.
When: April 27th, 1PM PST, 3PM CST, 6PM UTC
Where: Online via Goto Meeting

Webinar Abstract:

The role of the Simulation Technician varies with every simulation program. This talk will aim to provide practical tips for the new and mid-career level Simulation Technician. I will use practical examples from the earlier part of my career to the current to discuss how to work through sometimes difficult work flow dynamics and how the role of the Simulation Technician can be integral in bridging gaps to good simulation practices and operations.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how to define your role when there isn’t much direction
  2. Learn to re-define your role within your organization through identifying operational gaps
  3. Learn the importance of good communication with your co-workers

About the Instructor:

Jeremiah Avarana, M.Engr, M.Ed. Jeremiah Avarana is currently a Simulation Technician at Tarrant County College’s (TCC) Department of Nursing supporting ADN- level simulation. He has worked as a Simulation Technician for 3.5 years total with experience in BSN and MSN simulation as well. Before simulation, Jeremiah completed advanced degrees in biomedical engineering and education with little clue of where it would one day take him. Healthcare simulation has answered that question. In his role, he has performed set-up and tear down of all nursing specialty simulations, programmed scenarios, taught faculty how to operate, set-up task trainers, acted in simulation productions, acted as standardized patient, and developed moulage for high-stakes and disaster simulation. His passion is to see the Simulation Technician role become a commonplace in every major simulation program and be a part of Simulation Technician training.

 

Sim Tech Resources: Early-Bird Registrations & Online Subscriptions 

Are you looking for more great medical simulation technology resources? Join SimGHOSTS for more than 50% off last year’s annual subscription rates to gain access to thousands of global community members, new training courses, over 200 recorded sessions and more! Then, be sure to check out the early-bird registration for their USA, UK, and Australia based events, or submit an abstract for their 2nd annual Dubai event!

Learn more about this Webinar on the SimGHOSTS website!

“A Simulator Is Not A Strategy” – New Solutions From Laerdal and NLN

laerdal solutions

Laerdal’s new solutions website says “A Simulator Is Not a Strategy”. Partnering with the NLN, Laerdal has built new solutions to help nursing simulation programs increase the adoption and utilization of their simulator systems to improve their learning outcomes. What new support is Laerdal offering?

Comprehensive Assessments: Expert trained consultants will conduct a series of on-site meetings, interviews, and surveys with your team to evaluate your institution.

Implementation: A key success factor in building a successful and sustainable simulation program, is tailoring the scope of the implementation to address the teaching, program infrastructure, curriculum, debriefing methods, and clinical environment.

Pulse Checks: Pulse Check is the time to take the pulse of your simulation program, adhere to business success tools and make a lasting, effective change.

From Laerdal’s New Webpage:

“A Simulator Is Not a Strategy” may sound bold coming from the leader in high fidelity simulation. But, even our best simulators only do a fraction of their job if they are not put to good use. In a survey of nursing programs, the majority reported owning patient simulators. Yet, only 50% used them to conduct high fidelity scenario-based simulations. That means the other 50% are missing out. 

Simulation in nurse training can replace up to 50% of hospital clinical hours. Clinical hours are often viewed as one of a nursing program’s biggest constraints. Clinical hours are often expensive, involve logistical challenges, and can even be a barrier to school expansion. Simulation can replace half of those clinical hours. And, the good news is that for the majority of our customers, achieving this means merely leveraging the resources you already have. Your simulators are eager to be put to good use.

Laerdal’s Simulation Education Solutions for Nursing are designed to provide you with an optimized training environment that will help you improve utilization, achieve efficient quality outcomes, and maximize your return-on-investment for the assets you already have.

Please take our Simulation Gap Assessment to see how well you are optimizing the assets you already have. These questions are based on recognized standards from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSIH), the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL), and the National League for Nursing (NLN).

Take the Assessment on Laerdal’s New Solution Webpage today and see where your program can grow!

“Building an EMS Simulation Program”, A Video Interview with Victor Valley College – Sponsored by CAE Healthcare

victor valley college ems program

Recently on a trip between Las Vegas and Los Angeles I stopped by Apple Valley California at the Victor Valley College Paramedic Academy Regional Public Safety Training Center. CAE Healthcare Regional Sales Manager Richard Kuschinsky RCP had made the introduction for me to the people behind their simulation program: Brian Hendrickson MS, EMT-P – Assistant Professor, Clinical Coordinator and David C. Oleson, MS, EMT-P – Director, EMS Programs, Department Chair of Public Safety.

Richard told me for months “Lance, you have to stop by and see what this simulation team is doing — it’s amazing”, and after spending a day with the VVC team I totally agree. CAE Healthcare helped to sponsor the production costs of a video interview of the space, the program, and the people who are making simulation work for EMS training at the RPST Center in a way we can all learn from.

Brian Hendrickson: “The building here at the Public Safety Center is actually located in Apple Valley, CA and we are part of the Victor Valley College which is in Victorville, CA.  One of the reasons we moved out here to the kind of Northern end of Apple Valley is that it’s in kind of an industrial area, there is a lot of open area.  We’re able to conduct training, do burns, and that type of stuff without really disturbing any of the neighbors because really, our neighbors are the industrial trucking.”

David Oleson: “It’s a 9 acre facility that houses both law enforcement, fire, and EMS.  Voters approved this in 2008 and it was finished and we actually moved in and held our first courses here in the early Spring of 2012.”

Hendrickson – “Currently we’re able to run usually 4-5 manikins a day when we’re doing simulation – giving every student an opportunity to take at least one, but preferably two team leads a day in the simulation arena.  And, as far as the building – when we build this facility one of the things we did not want is to have the typical simulation space with a hospital bed and fixed cameras and everything like that because as EMS providers, our environment is much different than the hospital, the needs of the patient are much different.  So, we took it on with the premise that the whole 9 acres of our facility would be open to do simulation at.  So if we wanted to do it in a classroom setting – we could do it in a classroom setting.  If we wanted to use the workspace out in the prop yard, we can. We have certain city where we have an apartment building set up, we have a jail cell set up, we have businesses set up – we can do simulation anywhere on the 9 acres and make it as true to life as possible for our students so that when they get into the real world of EMS they’re used to the environment.  They’re used to working in people’s houses, out on the side of the road, in the streets, in jail cells, that type of thing.  So our goal with simulation and this whole facility was to use it all.”

cae healthcare ems simulators

Hendrickson: “We can run up to 7 separate stations with our cameras and our cubes and never have any crossover, never have any conflict, and be able to run them all as true to life as possible.  Complete suspension of belief for the student”.

“To date we’ve had very little problems with the CAE Healthcare manikins.  We’re able to use them in our tunnel system, we’re able to use them in cars.  Have we had breakdowns and have we had some issues? Absolutely, but the customer service has been superb.  We break something, we report it, and usually within 7-10 days a fix has been given to us or they come out and repair.  And, we’ve been tough on them.  We’ve broken probably more arms than anybody else with CAE Healthcare.  In fact I know that’s a fact because CAE Healthcare has asked “what do you guys do, how come you have so many broken arms”.  And it’s just the way we treat ‘em.  But repair has been wonderful, customer service has been wonderful.  And I am not afraid – we are not afraid to take those manikins and run them in any environment here at the Public Safety Center.”

Oleson: “One of our biggest successes with deciding to go with CAE Healthcare and going operational is that connectivity has not been an issue whatsoever, from day one.  Our campus has actually sunk quite a bit of money into expanding, as Brian mentioned earlier, our connectivity out on the prop yard which coincidentally is the largest footprint of this 9 acre site – is our prop yard.  Once we got comfortable that first semester with running it here out of the classroom and didn’t really experience any issues because we were only running maybe 1-2 manikins at a time.  Now we’re running 4 concurrently, all day long.  And, since that expansion has gone out in the prop yard, we’ve not really had any network lag issues to speak of and it’s been fairly seamless.”

Hendrickson: “I tell all of the people that come in and are helping out with simulation that they are only limited by their own lack of creativity.  That simulation just allows them to be creative, to think outside of the box, to teach students things that they may not see in an EMS career – maybe once or twice, or to teach them things that they’re going to see everyday. So simulation is buy in from everybody, it’s a group effort.”

Be sure to watch the video above to really get a sense of how powerful this simulation program is. Brian, David, and their simulation team have done an amazing job at creating realistic learning environments for their paramedic program through medical simulation. Kudos to the administrative leadership behind Victor Valley College for having the courage to build such a powerful place to teach the civil service professionals of tomorrow. Thanks to Richard Kuschinsky and Kevin King of CAE Healthcare for their continuous support of simulation educators and for helping HealthySim share this amazing story with you today!

To learn more visit:

VVC Regional Public Safety Training Center

&

CAEHealthcare.com