Complete Administrator’s Guide To Healthcare Simulation ‘HealthySimAdmin’ Program Series Now Available for Free!

healthysimadmin

Sim champs HealthySimulation.com is welcoming 2017 with a bang by recapping for you here ALL eight HealthySimAdmin videos! Each of these 2 hour recorded sessions provides key administrative insights by an entire panel of leading healthcare simulation program directors! Sponsored by Laerdal, B-Line Medical, and Pocket Nurse, the original value of watching the program online was $450, but now the entire program is available to watch for free online!

HealthySimAdmin was the world’s first broadcasted event providing an open and online discussion to share administrative solutions for the “how to” of medical simulation. Hundreds of simulation program administrators from around the world have watched the HealthySimAdmin panel of sim lab management experts from hospital, military, community college and university nursing programs, medical schools, EMS providers as well as medical simulation consultant groups to cover eight community-selected topics which included: Collaborative simulation program development, Funding sources & models, Faculty/educator buy-in, Research coordination, Daily operations, IT issues & support, Increasing utilization & Business development!

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Watch this highlight to preview some of the thousands of administrative tips to be gained from HealthySimAdmin:



Learn what other sim lab administrators are saying about HealthySimAdmin:

Each of the following sessions starts with a 40 minute presentation by the associated key speaker which is then followed by 60 minutes of discussion and Q&A session by the entire expert panel:

Part 1: “Collaborative Simulation Program Development” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN

Part 2: “Funding Sources & Models” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN & COL (Ret) John McManus, MD, MCR

Part 3: “Clinical Educator Training & Buy-in” – Jane Kleinman RN, MAOM

Part 4: “Sim Research Development” – Amar Pravin Patel, MS, NREMT-P, CFC

Part 5: “Maximizing Daily Operations” – Henry Henao MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC, EMT

Part 6: “IT Structures & Issues” – James Cypert BAP, BAIT, MCSE, MCT, MCP

Part 7: “Increasing Sim Program Utilization” – Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D.

Part 8: “Business Development & Revenue Generation” – Lance Baily, HealthySimAdmin Organizer

Complete Session Details are available on those pages. Reasons to Watch HealthySimAdmin, NOW TOTALLY FREE:

  • Expand your knowledge by learning from a diverse group of sim admins
    The HealthySimAdmin panel of experts is comprised of successful simulation program administrators from a variety of settings including: community, state and university nursing schools, medical schools, EMS programs, hospitals, IT departments, and the military. Additional panel members will include leading industry consultants who have designed and managed sim labs around the globe. HealthySimAdmin will not only share “proven-to-work” techniques from others in your field but also provide an expanded perspective from others that utilize medical simulation within healthcare.
  • Learn from your new professional community
    Currently there are no professional degrees in medical simulation program management. Simulation program administrators have varied experience which may include successful or maybe, not so successful, strategies for managing a simulation center/lab. For example, a sim lab program manager with an IT background will have little trouble integrating their center’s network technology, but may find clinical educator training and buy-in much more challenging. In that sense, our growing international community is the best resource we have for learning and sharing the best practices in each of the numerous facets necessary to operate a simulation lab. HealthySimAdmin’s mission is to create a global and shared community online space where healthcare simulation program administrators can find and share information unique to medical simulation management.
  • Participate from anywhere in the world
    What happened in Vegas did not stay in Vegas with HealthySimAdmin! With any high-speed internet connection you will be able to watch HealthySimAdmin wherever you are. Join an international audience of healthcare simulation managers who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and gain global insight into the operations and development of a successful medical simulation program.
  • Maximize your time with medical simulation admin specific content
    While the methodology of simulation in healthcare continues to expand exponentially across the globe, the discussions regarding the operations and management of this technology are relatively new. And while other medical simulation-based meetings do exist, they primarily serve our community’s clinical educators. Thus, resources and guidance for program administrators remains limited. To address this challenge, HealthySimAdmin held an event specifically designed to meet the needs of healthcare simulation program administrators. Catch up to the hundreds of other administrators who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and maximize your time and resources by engaging with content that is as unique as your profession!

Sign Up for HealthySimulation.com’s Free Email Newsletter for more Great Content!


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7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 2

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Last week we covered the first half of “7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program“, following our series of articles which cover the “business side” of selling the tool of simulation to higher levels of administration. Other topics from this series included the “Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget” and “3 Key Resources to Expand Your simulation Program“.

Today we finish up with the second half of steps necessary to be affective in starting or expanding your simulation program, with examples from my time as Director of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. In two years we were able to secure a quarter of a millions dollars in external business contracts providing simulation services to local, regional, and international groups. Miss the first part of this article, click here to start at the beginning which covers gaining support, building a program, and seizing opportunities.

4. Market Your Program

Once you have built a program plan that has potential to secure internal or external clients, your team will need to establish a marketing plan. First and foremost your department should Build a Medical Simulation Program Website, rich with multimedia. If available, work with your institution’s media department to help build and craft multimedia materials such as flyers, websites and pages, pictures, videos, and social media outlets. Learn more here about “How to Add Multimedia to Your Simulation Program“.

Designing effective marketing materials is a skill set that you or your team members may not naturally have at your disposal. There are countless resource materials for learning these skill sets such as 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People, but suffice to say your messaging should be clear, coherent, simple, and professional. With print material, use a maximum of three different fonts, and three different colors. Provide critical course, event, or program details relevant to capturing interest and providing key details such as dates, times, links, abstracts, and learning opportunities. Simplify “learning objectives” to 9 words or less, and use both paragraph and bullet point text formats for key content. (Psychological studies have shown that some people will only read paragraphs in advertisements, while others will only read bullet points). Images help to tell a story as “pictures are worth a thousand words”. If that is true then video is worth a million — but only if it is done professionally without shakey cameras, bad audio, or confusing editing!

Test your marketing messages by showing it to colleagues for feedback, but remember that your customer will be your greatest asset when it comes to learning from your created materials. Check out an example of simulation training courses in this recent CSCLV flyer. Can you spot some areas for improvement? What catches your eye? What areas distract you? Be sure to include call to actions that demonstrate the limited availability of your program, cost saving registration deadlines, other incentives like discounts for groups or longer campaigns as well as next steps like online registration or email contact.

Don’t forget about Social Media in relevant professional domains like twitter, youtube, and LinkedIn. Social Media Overload: Simple Social Media Strategies For Overwhelmed and Time Deprived Businesses is a good primer on how to effectively utilize social media for your marketing campaigns.

Finally — attend regional or national conferences and share your marketing materials on available pin boards or tables for external users, or on department cafeteria signs, newsletters, or other group sharing events for internal users.

5. Provide Quality

Remember that internal and external users of your simulation program are in essence your “customers”. We all know what happens when we have a bad experience at a store, restaurant, or movie — we don’t return and we let others know about it. Providing a high quality event, course, or learning opportunity is a crucial part of building a simulation program. The more realistic your environments, the more tested your simulation scenarios, the better the food you serve, the easier the directions to your facility, the more people will enjoy your program and the happier they will be with the experience.

This kind of experience is crucial for step 6, but before we get there, consider the experience you are providing by “trying it on” and imaging yourself with no prior knowledge about the activity. Or better yet, act as a customer and trial run all the various systems in place for your program. What areas do you find lacking in service, quality, or professionalism? Every detail matters when it comes to satisfying the learners, groups, and individuals that come through your program. You or your leadership should sit in on some or all of the first programs to see how things are working and gain first hand experience on what needs to be improved.

6. Gather Feedback & Testimonials

This is one of the most important steps to building a long-term successful simulation program. By gathering direct honest feedback from your participants you will be better able to learn what went right, but more importantly, what went wrong. Try not to lead the witness but ask open ended questions on top of “scale of 1-5” questions that cover the most crucial aspects of the program. By quickly sharing this feedback with your team you can incorporate new solutions to address key problems.

While working in Hollywood I learned that during test screenings of new films, producers cared most about the question “Would you recommend this movie to your friends?”. This is a crucial question that ultimately demonstrates the value of your program because individuals will only encourage others to also participate if they feel it will add social value to their relationship status because of the benefits it will bring their colleagues. In other words, is your simulation program “share worthy”? Be ready to capture some of the feedback you receive to utilize as testimonials for future participants and program marketing. Obviously you will need to secure permission to share feedback as testimonials, so talk to your legal team to see what kind of waiver will suffice. Use these testimonials in your future marketing material design, as future users weigh such reviews more heavily than other types of messaging, simply because it reduces the risk of “going first”.

7. Learn, Improve and Grow

With honest feedback you can tweak your smaller programs for better efficiency and outcomes, preparing you for larger growth opportunities in the future. Those making investments into your program, whether its external users or the CEO of your hospital, will be moved farther faster with proven results with budgets already allocated. Becoming a cost-reduction program through improved learning and patient care outcomes enables you to increase budgets for future innovative practices. Dr. John “Voz” Vozenilek shared at SimGHOSTS 2016 USA during the EMS SimulationIQ sponsored keynote address how the Jump Trading Simulation Center is doing this very thing.

Other areas that will help your program grow are “Kaizen” Events To Increase Efficiency & Outcomes, the ability to negotiate with others to ensure maximum return on investment, and always being open to new opportunities. However, remember that after you have built a successful program, some smaller activities may no longer provide enough return on investment for your program’s growth to warrant the time and energy necessary to do such work. For example at the CSCLV, some UNLV students wanted to utilize the simulation center to film their senior project. We allowed them to use the space only to find out later they had damaged some equipment. Without insurance, we had to eat the cost of repairing that equipment with no value added to our center’s portfolio.

 

Hear what other simulation center directors have done to increase sales of their program’s services by watching the HealthySimAdmin series — free for HealthySimulation.com Newsletter Subscribers!

7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 1

growing a simulation program

This month we have been covering key business considerations your simulation teams needs to have in place to build or expand your program. Previous articles in this series include the “Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget” and “3 Key Resources to Expand Your simulation Program“.

In today’s article I share how as the Director of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas, I was able to secure $250,000 in external business contracts in just two years. These additional funds helped the center hire additional staff and purchases new equipment. So, note that although this article focuses on external contracts, a lost of the materials presented here will also help you expand your simulation services to internal departments within your institution.

The discussion focuses on 7 key areas necessary to create a successful sales funnel for your simulation services, the first 3 of which we will cover today:

  1. Gaining support
  2. Building a program
  3. Seizing opportunities
  4. Marketing yourself
  5. Providing quality services
  6. Securing feedback
  7. Perfecting systems.

1. Gain Support

Before building an external simulation program, I knew I would need to gain the support of the executive leadership of our department to spend time and energy focusing on clients outside our internal stakeholders. At the CSCLV this leadership was the Deans of the collaborative schools sharing the space (all of whom were under the roof of the Nevada System of Higher Education UNLV, NSC, and UNSOM).

After our first year of utilization I was able to show the deans that our center’s spaces were not being utilized during many nights and weekends. This was followed up by the reminder of an opportunity to “rent” those spaces to groups that may be interested in training healthcare learners or being in a healthcare looking facility without actual patients. The deans agreed that an exploration of external business development could help to cover the costs not only for the staff time needed to manage those engagements, but additional staff time to help our own programs and also pay for new equipment in the future when needed.

The deans reminded me that I would need to get permission for a special account from the State system to take in revenue, and that I would need to generate a contract template for external users to protect the center — one that included a demand for proof of insurance by the external programs to cover any accidents. Following this I met with the Center’s legal support out of UNLV to address all of these concerns in-order to get the final sign off on starting an external program.

2. Build a Program

The most important thing to remember when starting the development of a new simulation program, internal or external, is to start small. By creating a successful program that is manageable and repeatable, your team can “rinse and repeat” on cruise control while reserving development energies for bigger projects. Remember that teams fatigue by new information, new processes, new technologies, and new systems. By aiming too high in the beginning, we risk exhausting ourselves and our programs. With a smaller program, we can be sure not to extend our resources too far too quickly and burn out. Remember, the longterm success of the program is the goal — and smaller steps will help us to build upon our achievements and ultimately move farther, faster.

This mindset helped our team pick our first external client, the ATLS course from the County Hospital next door. The group was looking for a new host to provide the space for the training, and store the materials necessary for the courses. Their educators would provide the training, and the local marketing. Our team would store their equipment, provide them space, provide additional marketing, and secure a small fee for our work.

This 2-day smaller program enabled our team to work through hundreds of issues that came up without overwhelming us from our “8 to 5” work for internal users of our simulation program. Items like catering, collecting payments, scheduling, contracts, and security concerns were addressed during the 2 months leading up to the first event. How we would deal with parking and directions to the room itself needed to be considered! Profits from this program were small at just about $1500 per weekend event.

Obviously we learned a great deal from the first program at the Center which we incorporated in future events (more on this later). The important thing to note here is that following this course we could now handle bigger, longer, and more expensive programs for external clients. Following this we launched simulation based training courses in partnership with an external consultant that lasted 4-5 days and required a great deal more support by our team for simulation experiences, marketing, and administration. Profits from these events increased to about $6,000 per event.

Following the successful completion of several such trainings, we were ready for multi-week programs with local hospitals and private schools that ended up generating $50,000+ contracts. Had we started from nothing to this high level of service I am sure we would have failed to provide high quality programs which are necessary to ensure supporting long-term relationships and positive testimonials, while minimizing staff stress levels.

3. Seize Opportunities

Consider what makes your simulation program special? What services can your team, center, program provide that internal stakeholders or external clients may need? Think small and think big: what local groups could benefit from ongoing long-term training engagements and what international groups would visit your center for one-off specialized training programs? What equipment does your program already have access to which is rare? Are you located in a travel destination?

The CSCLV is located in Las Vegas, which means that it can attract individuals from around the world that are interested in gaining necessary CEUs/CMUs while traveling to a fun location. What unique opportunities does your equipment, faculty, program, and city offer to potential clients?

Another benefit of Las Vegas is its close proximity to Hollywood, which helped Our Sim Center Have Its Most Profitable Day Ever. Production companies will pay big bucks to rent facilities that look like clinical locations but that don’t have real patients to worry about.

Knowing what you can offer local, regional, national, and international clients will enable you to identify and build programs which will speak to and attract new business to your program.

Are you interested in a deeper dive into these topics?

Check out the 8 recorded sessions from the HealthySimAdmin event for free after Subscribing to the HealthySim Monthly Newsletter!

*Update: Part 2 of this article series is now available, which provides us with 4 more insights necessary to grow your simulation program: Marketing, Delivery, Feedback and Growth!


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Central Florida Continues to Push Medical Simulation Innovations

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Terri Bernhardt wrote an article earlier this year for i4biz.com, which promotes entrepreneurship through Central Florida, covering the topic of Medical Simulation. The article is a great highlight of where simulation is, and where it is all going. Highly recommend this one!

Excerpt from i4biz.com:

“No commercial airline pilot or military aviator ever takes off in a multi-million dollar aircraft without logging countless hours in a flight simulator. Military and commercial aviation learned long ago it was not only much cheaper (one tenth the cost of live training), but it was far more effective to train personnel in lifelike scenarios where failure was an option. In fact, it was part of the learning experience.

The transition from simulating jets, tanks and helicopters to simulating patients in emergency or clinical situations faced by combat medics, nurses and doctors has been quickly evolving, in an industry that has called Central Florida its home for over 40 years.

This inventive group combines science, engineering and art to make fake blood that feels, smells and clots just like real blood. They turn a high-fidelity mannequin into a groaning, twisting man with congestive heart failure that is so realistic that the trainee sweats while trying to stabilize him. These same people develop serious games that take nurses through triage and combat medics through tying tourniquets in real time with life-like scenarios, followed by an after action review for effective memory retention.

With all eyes on Lake Nona’s Medical City, breakthrough simulation technologies, medical research and medical training are able to converge. Harry Robinson is the national program manager of the Veterans Health Administration’s Simulation Learning Education and Research Network, “SimLEARN.” For the retired Navy aviator, the ability and potential of simulators to duplicate real life scenarios was obvious. “Just like when I was a squadron commander, we are able to replicate an actual situation, in this case a medical procedure or medical emergency situation, in a safe environment, where there is no danger or inconvenience to a human patient. Also, trainees are able to both develop the skills (in diagnosis and in muscle memory) and then have a meaningful debrief, where we actually watch the training exercise.

What’s Next?

Greg Welch, Ph.D., the Florida Hospital Endowed Chair in Health Care Simulation at UCF, has been working in the field in one form or another for decades, but his current work is taking medical simulation to a whole new level. Currently, medical personnel are sometimes trained using actors that emotionally and physically imitate the behavior of someone with a particular condition, but there are limits to what an actor can mimic. What is more, there are limits to the number of actors and frequency of times these scenarios can be simulated.

Welch is working not to simply duplicate the movements, the feel or the anatomical authenticity of a medical android, but its mental and emotional behavior. “Part of the diagnostic procedure is really an interrogation of sorts, to actually determine what symptoms the patient is experiencing.  To successfully do that you have to understand how to communicate with the patient and empathize with their condition; you have to learn what questions to ask, along with developing the patience that is necessary to succeed in that process.

“My area of expertise and my passion over the last 20 years has been about simulating human interactive experiences. This is a physical/virtual reality, which simulates human behavior with the goal of building a computer-controlled system that mimics human responses for medical or health care related training,” continued Welch. “To do that you have to study human interaction and transfer that knowledge to a patient/clinician experience that is lifelike and authentic. We want to simulate the fear, pain, discomfort of a patient and help the clinician learn to be comfortable interacting and doing what is sometimes awkward or socially inappropriate to do.”

Read the Full “Heart of Medical Simulation Article” on i4biz.com!

August 22nd-24th Healthcare Education Assessment Training & Technology (HEATT) Conference EXTENDS Early-Bird Rates!

After the SimGHOSTS 2014 USA (August 5th-8th) simulation technician training event, I will be speaking at HEATT 2014 alongside SimGHOSTS President James Cypert on the topic of ‘technician’s behind the technology’. If you are a healthcare educator, administrator, innovator or entrepreneur, I highly recommend this new unique learning event, put on by groups that leaders in aviation simulation training conferences worldwide! Best of all, I heard this morning that early-bird registration has been extended so you can still sign up for a discounted rate!

Act Now! Early-bird rates for this year’s Healthcare Education Assessment Training & Technology (HEATT) Conference HAVE BEEN EXTENDED – REGISTER TODAY!

Human performance is the single most important contributor to quality (and safety). Regardless of the spend on buildings, equipment, catering and the countless other contributors to ‘quality,’ whenever carers are not trained adequately standards of work could decline and all other investment is wasted. HEATT 2014 has a strong three-day program addressing the need for a renaissance in healthcare training, taking a closer look at modern education and training techniques, including simulation, that can make a huge difference to safety as it has in other high risk industries.

Discussion topics include:

  • The Business of Healthcare
  • The Future of Healthcare
  • Intersections: Healthcare Innovation through Simulation and Engineering
  • The Curricula Revolution in Medical Schools
  • Developing a Nurse Practitioner Simulation Program
  • Graduate Medical Education Federal Funding: CMS and HRSA
  • Surgical Simulation
  • How Can Simulation Centers Transform Healthcare?
  • Fundamentals of Robotic Surgery Curriculum Development
  • Using Audio-Based Simulation to Impact Kirkpatrick Level 4 Learning Results
  • And much more!

To view the complete program and a list of confirmed speakers click here.

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REGISTER NOW AND SEE YOU THERE!