Stratasys 3D Printers Create Realistic Medical Training Models | IMSH 2017 Video Interview

healthcare simulation 3d printers

Continuing our coverage of IMSH 2017 exhibits, today HealthySim shares an interview with Stratasys to learn more about their innovative 3D printer technologies which provide realistic medical models. Using multiple printer heads allows Stratasys customers to print a variety of 3d models with different plastics, creating vibrant products with flexible components. Watch our video interview below to see the printer in action!

Applications Within Medicine for Stratasys 3D printed Models:

Medical Device Prototyping: Get to market faster with clinically meaningful and marketable products. Use 3D printing solutions to rapidly produce prototypes with the shape, texture, and material properties of any medical device. Validate device performance on patient-derived 3D printed anatomical models versus existing models such as animals and cadavers. Based on real patient imaging, 3D printed models mimic a variety of tissue properties in a single print. Stratasys Medical 3D Printing Solutions can help you accelerate product development from 3D printed concept models to preclinical testing allowing manufacturers to gain certainty, test anywhere, and mitigate cost overruns.


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Education and Training: 3D printed multi-material models can replicate the complexity and wide range of patient pathology, making them superior tools for medical education. But how do 3D printed models compare to traditional training methods? Conduct clinically relevant training anywhere on realistic anatomical models customized for virtually any clinical scenario. Provide a memorable, hands-on experience with customized models that represent specific pathologies and mimic human tissue and bone. Multi-material 3D medical printing creates accurate, versatile models in less time and at a fraction of the cost.

Surgical Planning Models: Optimize surgical planning with spatially, tactilely, and physically accurate models based on patient scans. Surgical teams can use the 3D printed models to plan therapeutic approaches, and make more efficient use of expensive operating room time. Advance medical outcomes one patient at a time. By creating patient-specific models on demand, surgeons can better prepare for procedures and operate with greater efficiency and confidence.

Learn more on the Stratasys Medical Page today!

 


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3D Systems (NYSE: DDD) Acquires Simbionix

3d systems simbionix

This week I learned of a very interesting industry development that 3D Systems (NYSE: DDD), which is one of the world’s leading 3d printing companies, acquired surgical simulator company Simbionix. 3D Systems goes beyond personal 3d printers with high-accuracy professional modeling systems which can be used for prototyping and functional part manufacturing. Consider just one of their printing systems:

Why I find this acquisition so interesting is knowing that 3D Systems can produce medical models and/or components, and that Simbionix is one of the major players in the surgical simulator space. Very curious to see what new innovations this new partnership will bring the healthcare education technology community.

About 3D Systems:

3D Systems is pioneering 3D printing for everyone. 3DS provides the most advanced and comprehensive 3D design-to-manufacturing solutions including 3D printers, print materials and cloud sourced custom parts. Its powerful digital thread empowers professionals and consumers everywhere to bring their ideas to life in material choices including plastics, metals, ceramics and edibles. 3DS’ leading healthcare solutions include end-to-end simulation, training and integrated 3D planning and printing for personalized surgery and patient specific medical and dental devices. Its democratized 3D design and inspection products embody the latest perceptual, capture and touch technology. Its products and services replace and complement traditional methods with improved results and reduced time to outcomes. These solutions are used to rapidly design, create, communicate, plan, guide, prototype or produce functional parts, devices and assemblies, empowering customers to manufacture the future.

About the Simbionix Acquisition:

This is an ideal fit as the world moves toward personalized medicine and patient specific procedures.  3D Systems has re-imagined the future of medicine and has added two other healthcare companies in the past several weeks Medical Modeling (range of custom anatomical models and Virtual Surgical Planning services) and LayerWise (metal additive manufacturing).

3D Systems provides the most advanced and comprehensive 3D design-to-manufacturing capabilities.  Healthcare solutions include integrated 3D planning and printing for personalized surgery and patient specific medical and dental devices, and training simulators that feature the Simbionix product line.

These products and services replace and complement traditional methods with improved results and reduced time to outcomes. These solutions are used to rapidly design, create, communicate, plan, guide, prototype or produce functional parts, devices and assemblies, empowering customers to manufacture the future. Simbionix training simulators are used in 2500+ institutions in 70+ countries around the world.

 Learn more about Simbionix and their new parent company 3D Systems

3D Printed Anatomy To Revolutionize Medical Training

Check out this amazing story coming out of Australia where 3D Printers are being used to create anatomical models for medical education!

3d printed anatomy

From the Monash University Website:

“The creators of a unique kit containing anatomical body parts produced by 3D printing say it will revolutionise medical education and training, especially in countries where cadaver use is problematical.

The ‘3D Printed Anatomy Series’, developed by experts from Monash University, is thought to be the first commercially available resource of its kind. The kit contains no human tissue, yet it provides all the major parts of the body required to teach anatomy of the limbs, chest, abdomen, head and neck.

Professor Paul McMenamin, Director of the University’s Centre for Human Anatomy Education, said the simple and cost-effective anatomical kit would dramatically improve trainee doctors’ and other health professionals’ knowledge and could even contribute to the development of new surgical treatments.

“For centuries cadavers bequested to medical schools have been used to teach students about human anatomy, a practice that continues today. However many medical schools report either a shortage of cadavers, or find their handling and storage too expensive as a result of strict regulations governing where cadavers can be dissected,” he said.

“Without the ability to look inside the body and see the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels, it’s incredibly hard for students to understand human anatomy. We believe our version, which looks just like the real thing, will make a huge difference.”

After scanning real anatomical specimens with either a CT or a surface laser scanner, the body parts are 3D printed either in a plaster-like powder or in plastic, resulting in high resolution, accurate colour reproductions. The kit, which is set to go on sale later this year, could have particular impact in developing countries where cadavers aren’t readily available, or are prohibited for cultural or religious reasons.”

Read the full article on 3D Printed Anatomy from Australia’s Monash University here!


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