University of San Francisco Launches Online Healthcare Simulation Certificate Program

certificate in healthcare simulation

The University of San Francisco Healthcare Simulation Certificate Program for Professional Development online program is now taking applications for the Fall August 2017 start date! Click the link below to learn more and register for the program!

With Simulation emerging as a novel approach to educating and training healthcare professionals, the demand for simulation professionals has skyrocketed. The University of San Francisco is proud to be leading this change by announcing our new online Certificate in Healthcare simulation program. This unique 3 semester (one year) certificate is designed for both clinicians and non-clinicians requiring no previous experience. “As a non clinician with a history in theatre and business, this gave me a great overall picture of healthcare simulation and how I can bring my specialty to the industry.” Katie Francis, Alumni and Simulation Operations Manager The certificate prepares you for opportunities in healthcare simulation, teaching, management and operations.

Healthcare Sim Cert Program Features


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  • Online format – Students attend courses online and complete assignments when they choose, adhering to coursework deadlines.
  • Designed to complete in one (1) year or three (3) semesters.
  • Students are required to attend a teaching & instruction Practicum held in a Simulation Lab (in-person or virtual).

The Sim Certificate Will Prepare You To:

  • Implement current simulation organizational standards in curriculum design and teaching
  • Integrate educational principles into simulation practice
  • Distinguish effective, psychomotor and cognitive learning strategies in simulation education
  • Appraise evaluation tools for utility in simulation education
  • Create innovative education designs for interprofessional practice
  • Analyze sustainable business plans for the operation of a simulation lab or program

Distinguished Faculty

  • The Director of the program, KT Waxman, DNP, RN, CNL, CENP, CHSE, FAAN is Director of the California Simulation Alliance and is an internationally known speaker and author on the topic of healthcare simulation.
  • Cynthia Shum DNP (c), MEd, RN, CHSE–A is the Healthcare Simulation Educator at the Veteran’s Hospital in Palo Alto, CA. Cynthia has received a Certificate of Outstanding Contribution in reviewing the “Clinical Simulation in Nursing” journal in 2015. In 2012 she was awarded the Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator certificate by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.

Learn how you can be a part of this exciting program at the USF Healthcare Simulation Certificate Page!


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Watch: Gardaí Simulate Terror Attack at Dublin’s Docklands

Watch: Gardaí test response to terror attack in simulation at Dublin's Docklands

The Irish-based Gardai engaged with a counter-terrorism exercise in Dublin recently to test their response in the event of a mass casualty terrorist attack. The simulation, codenamed ’Sciath’, involved a number of actors at the Docklands railway station in Dublin’s north inner city and the garda units involved today had not been told ahead of time what would be involved.

Does your simulation program work with local Civil Service Groups to provide simulated training opportunities? The promotional opportunities to develop new business opportunities and showcase your simulation program are clearly evident!


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As part of the simulation, the men inside acted out assaulting a number of people inside the station. Armed officers used stun grenades and blank rounds, shooting one of the suspects and securing the scene. “Today has demonstrated the professionalism and the capability that we have,” Garda Commissioner Nóirín O’Sullivan told reporters after the training exercise was finished. “Incidents like this can happen. We have to make sure that we are ready to respond to those incidents. In the last few days we have given instructions to all of our members and I think we wanted to see how those instructions would work,” she said.

The Commissioner said simulations such as today’s operation are prioritised in high density areas like Dublin city, but she said further exercises will take place in other parts of the country to test response times outside the capital.

Mixed and Augmented Reality Can Facilitate Seamless Medical Communication

ar-healthcare-simulation

MedicalResearch.com recently interviewed Birmingham City University Associate Professor Dr. Ian Williams PhD about the work of the DMT lab on mixed and augmented reality for healthcare simulated training. Make no mistake, VR and AR are the future of healthcare simulated training:

Dr. Williams: Our work at the DMT Lab (dmtlab.bcu.ac.uk) focuses on developing a novel Mixed Reality (MR) medical presentation platform which allows practitioners to interact with patient data and virtual anatomical models in real time. The system enables the presentation of medical data, models and procedures to patients with the aim of educating them on pending procedures or the effects of lifestyle choices (for example the effects of smoking or excessive alcohol consumption).

The system employs an exocentric mixed reality environment which can be deployed in any room. It integrates a medical practitioner in real time with multimodal patient data and the corresponding result is a real time co-located visualisation of both the practitioner and the data, which they can interact with in real time.  We implement a natural interaction method into the system which improves a user’s level of direct interaction with the virtual models and provides a more realistic control of the data.

The system can also be used in a fun educational setting where patients, students, children or any naive user, can learn about medical anatomical information via a real-time interactive mixed reality “body scanner”. This fun system overlays the MR information onto their own body in real-time and shows them scaled and interactive virtual organs, anatomy and corresponding medical information. We are aiming for this system to be used not only in patient education but also in engaging and informing people on lifestyle choices.


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MedicalResearch.com: What types of medical or surgical problems do you envision can be enhanced with the use of free hand gestures to manipulate patient data?

Dr. Williams: Mixed reality has enormous potential within the medical field, with healthcare being profoundly affected by some recent developments. Mixed reality technology can also provide the platform for facilitating a seamless doctor-patient communications in real time. The system we are developing can provide a real time augmented view of the patient’s data which can be overlaid onto the patient, or interacted with via freehand interaction without the use of complex wearable devices.

Many current mixed reality systems rely on bespoke sensors and cumbersome wearable devices (for example haptic gloves) whereas we work in freehand interaction without the need for a medical practitioner or patient to wear any complex wearable device. This interaction method enables a more natural virtual interface and via the use of naturally inspired physical interaction models (for example common real grasping types) we bridge the gap between users and technology. This form of natural interaction can also enable an interaction which can be perceived as more realistic to the observer.


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BuzzFeed Informs Public: Virtual Reality Is Medical Simulation Training’s Next Frontier

Virtual Reality Is Medical Training's Next Frontier

BuzzFeed recently reported on the new advances in VR technologies currently being utilized for medical training, a sign that our advanced methodologies are contiuning to interest mainstream media!

“There’s a baby boy on a stretcher in a children’s hospital emergency room. His mother is standing nearby, begging the doctors to do something, as her baby lies there. He is drooling and shaking; his diaper is soaked; he is making a disturbing snoring noise. An EMT comes in and says, “Doctor, this is a one-year-old male found by the mother at home, having a seizure. The seizure’s been lasting about seven minutes. Blood glucose on scene was 90.” The EMT leaves.

 

According to Dr. Joshua Sherman of CHLA and the USC Keck School of Medicine, VR helps solve several problems for medical training programs: expense, accessibility, and verisimilitude. (Sherman also helped develop the training.) Hands-on training for medical students and residents is time-consuming and expensive — mannequins run upwards of $50,000, plus maintenance and tech support — and also requires a room full of actual people to play the doctors and nurses. The other type of training currently used is screen-based training, but that doesn’t closely mimic a real-life situation. VR manages to replicate the atmosphere of an emergency room situation while also being accessible — a trainee can easily do it on his or her own time. Besides the simulated nature of the experience, the main drawbacks right now are lack of voice control and inability to have more than one person in the experience at the same time. There’s also currently only two training modules, so the applications are limited.


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Sherman’s first VR experience was the Oculus Dreamdeck — which puts users at the top of a very tall building. Sherman, who is afraid of heights, felt his heart rate go up and his palms get sweaty. “I knew it was not real but I couldn’t get myself to jump,” he said. “When I felt that physiologic response and how similar it was to the real world, I immediately thought, why can’t we use this to simulate the response on resuscitations? We can train people who we can’t train in real life, up to an extent, so then when they face it in real life, it still will be very stressful but they will be able to select the correct items and protocols under pressure.”

I’m not a doctor, nor am I training to be one, but when I tried the simulation (or as it’s officially called, the “VR Pediatric Resuscitation Module 1: Status Epilepticus”), I found myself getting anxious about choosing the right protocol for this fake baby. Though I was guided through it by Clay Park VR founder and former Oculus developer relations specialist Shauna Heller, who produced the project, it was still nerve-racking to be inside this emergency room, responsible for saving the life of an infant.

Sherman said that’s entirely the point. “We compared the physiology of stress in real-life emergency situations to that of people going through VR — their heart rate, breathing rate, and salivary cortisol, which is a stress hormone. The preliminary data shows that the heart rates definitely correlate between the real world and VR world.”

EMSWorld Interviews Moulage Concepts Founder Bobbie Merica About Simulation Realism Through Makeup

EMSWorld recently interviewed Moulage expert Bobbie Merica of MoulageConcepts.com to learn how moulage makeup can improve the educational outcomes of simulation by increasing the realism for learners. Here are a couple of excerpts from the EMSWorld article entitled The Importance of Accuracy in Moulage Trainingby Valeria Amato:

What advice would you give people who are looking to implement more realistic and effective moulage into training regimens?

It’s like anything else: You need to plan and prepare. When you develop your case scenarios, decide what the takeaway is going to be. Is it triage-specific? If so, then your wounds should accurately represent wounds related to triage. A lot of the time, people will throw in the moulage piece at the end without giving it any thought. They won’t collectively decide what the full-thickness burn is going to look like, what the pediatric patient will look like and how they’re going to present it. Locate an accurate picture on the Internet of an actual case. Practice creating moulage so that everyone in your training knows what these wounds will look like.

Mostly it’s about the planning. You’d never run your training scenarios without a great deal of planning. When you’re building those scenarios, start building in those moulage components. Understand what story you want to tell. Understand what the training outcome is. Is intubation with a full-thickness burn the outcome, or is it identifying the smoke inhalation? If the training outcome is smoke inhalation, then you don’t need a full-thickness burn. It’s not difficult to clarify that a full-thickness burn in the upper airway in the chest and neck has smoke inhalation. If you really want to know if someone has smoke inhalation, bring it back and test it in multiple areas. Create that eye-reddening, some tears coming down, the reddening in the back of the throat. That little bit of hoarseness. Break it out into multiple training avenues, unless intubating the patient with a full-thickness burn is the skill set.


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That makes sense, especially going back to what you said about using moulage in less of a theatrical capacity and for mass-casualty incidents.

If it’s a mass-casualty incident, you’re going to have some people who look like those first-line-of-response people, but often a lot of those people look the same. Certainly you should assess the woman screaming and covered in blood, but you might also want to look at that person quietly dying right next to her. It’s about creating all those aspects and using this as a tool to define where those strengths are and, more important, where those weaknesses are so you know how to align future training dollars.

I think every person, every entity and every training site should have access to this level of training. Moulage doesn’t have to be expensive and time-consuming. You can have amazing moulage that tells the whole story, allowing you to spend the next six weeks accurately training your participants to meet outcomes, that will cost you pennies.

Do you have a copy of Bobbie’s Best Selling Moulage Recipe Book? Check out our review here!


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Air Canada Almost in Deadliest Accident in Aviation History — CRM Training Saves Countless Lives

sfo near miss aviation simulation

Yesterday in San Francisco (July 10, 2017), Mercury News reporter MATTHIAS GAFNI wrote how Air Canada pilots almost landed an Airbus 320 onto the jetway where four other planes were waiting to take off. The incident provides a strong example of why Crew Resource Management (CRM) communication protocols allowed for everyone involved to create awareness, recommendations, and change. In this case that “must hear” communication helped save almost a thousand lives.

SAN FRANCISCO — In what one aviation expert called a near-miss of what could have been the largest aviation disaster ever, an Air Canada pilot on Friday narrowly avoided a tragic mistake: landing on the San Francisco International Airport taxiway instead of the runway.

Sitting on Taxiway C shortly before midnight were four airplanes full of passengers and fuel awaiting permission to take off, according to the Federal Aviation Administration, which is investigating the “rare” incident. An air traffic controller sent the descending Air Canada Airbus 320 on a “go-around” — an unusual event where pilots must pull up and circle around to try again — before the safe landing, according to the federal agency. FAA investigators are still trying to determine how close the Air Canada aircraft came to landing and potentially crashing into the four aircraft below, but the apparent pilot error already has the aviation industry buzzing.


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“If it is true, what happened probably came close to the greatest aviation disaster in history,” said retired United Airlines Capt. Ross Aimer, CEO of Aero Consulting Experts. He said he’s been contacted by pilots from across the country about the incident. “If you could imagine an Airbus colliding with four passenger aircraft wide bodies, full of fuel and passengers, then you can imagine how horrific this could have been,” he said.

You can bet that this exact scenario conditions will be programmed into simulators around the world, especially for those pilots flying into San Francisco. As well, I am sure that the Ground Control teams at SFO will take a deep look at the lighting patterns for the runway to see what else could be  done to better indicate approaching flights.

In aviation, such near misses cause huge safety investigations from multiple agencies. When does that happen in healthcare for our near misses? — Why is TeamStepps training not mandatory for healthcare professionals like CRM is for aviation industry professionals? Possibly because the lives of the healthcare providers aren’t also on the line, only their patients. Harsh as that may sound, why else would healthcare not force adoption of the issue, like aviation did? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below.

Read the Whole Mercury News Story About the Never-Event here

A Sim Tech Shares Why You Should Come to SimGHOSTS 2017 USA

simghosts sim training

Simulation Operator Rachel Bailey  recently shared with the simulation community why she suggests attending SimGHOSTS.


There is still time to register for the 2017 USA Event
Next month at WakeMed in Raleigh, NC August 1st-4th

From Rachel: SimGHOSTS is a community of hard working technicians that adapt to any environment given to them.    As technicians we work over 8 hours a day, and when we are not working, we are thinking about what we can do better in the simulation community.  We volunteer for projects, we come in early and stay late.  You have to love the job in order to stay in the field.  The hours we work and the constant struggle to ensure things operate well, can weigh heavily.  Sometimes we are in a no- win situation but it never prevents us from thinking of how to improve simulations for educators and learners.


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Being a sim tech is not the easiest job, nor the most rewarding, we do the job because we love it.  The demand of the job can leave us discouraged and burnt out, but when August comes around, we get to meet with people that are just like us and experience the same highs and lows of simulation operations.  I have attended several SimGHOSTS conferences, I get the pleasure of meeting new technicians, hearing their ideas, and seeing there fabrications.  The passion of this community is something to experience.  It is not about where you went to college, it is not about who you know, this conference is strictly about the job that we all love.

A fellow sim tech stated her experience at SimGHOSTS, as her “date night” with her job.  I couldn’t agree with her more.  This conference is more than educational, it is empowering.  When I thought I could not take one more reminder of what didn’t work , or how much time I spend at my job, that a select few really understand, I go to SimGHOSTS as a reminder that I really love what I do, and I love the community I am involved in.  I have attended SimGHOSTS as a presenter and a participant, and the community is the most inquisitive, intelligent, and involved in simulation technology that I have ever experienced.  People are proud and willing to share ideas and projects.  Every time I attend I am empowered to do my job for another year.

Whether you are tech, educator, coordinator, or director, the education you receive at SimGHOSTS is as unique as the people sharing what they have learned.  If you haven’t been to a conference, I urge you to try to persuade your leadership to invest in your education and your professional development.  See you in Carolina!

Learn more about joining Rachel at SimGHOSTS 2017 USA this Aug. 1-4!

Modern Healthcare Covers Growth of Healthcare Simulation Field

modern healthcare simulation

In the most recent addition of Modern Healthcare, the publisher covered the growing field of healthcare simulation with key interviews to help outsiders better understand the benefits of the emerging methodologies and technologies. This is a GREAT article to introduce others to the field of healthcare simulation, so be sure to share this link!

Simulation can save lives and limit patient harm by ensuring physicians young and old alike follow protocols and complete all the necessary steps in order to safely perform a procedure. In a study of 44 final-year medical students in Frankfurt, Germany, students who participated in a three-day simulation-based training course were found to have more thoroughly followed protocols for CPR and a trauma enactment in comparison to students who shadowed emergency physicians for three days. Students trained on simulators scored an average of 90% on their ability to complete steps required on a standard CPR checklist, while the other students scored 62%.

It’s not just students. Another study found that anesthesiologists who engaged in simulation-based training on how to properly wean patients from cardiopulmonary bypass performed better in real-life procedures than those who received traditional interactive seminars. Simulation-trained physicians scored over five percentage points higher when assessed two weeks later by senior staff on their ability to adequately complete necessary steps on a technical checklist. Similar results were shown five weeks after training. Researchers seeking to understand whether simulation could help improve training for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter cannulation found that 51% of simulation-trained residents were successful on the first try of cannulating a patient, as compared with the traditionally trained group’s success rate of 37%, according to a study published in the journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges.


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Medical malpractice payouts have begun climbing upward since 2012, reaching $3.9 billion in 2016. Connecticut’s payout rate per capita is among the highest in the nation. In hopes of reversing this trend and reducing risk, Connecticut-based Hartford HealthCare sought to improve simulation-based training for obstetricians, who are at a particularly high risk for malpractice suits. The health system’s Center for Education, Simulation and Innovation (CESI) developed a simulation-based training program that evaluates physician effectiveness in preventing shoulder dystocia, a high-risk labor complication in which labor is obstructed by the infant’s shoulder. The project utilized technology that measures the amount of force being applied to a simulated baby, eliminating the subjectivity of a doctor-to-doctor evaluation. “Verdicts in the state of Connecticut have been steadily increasing, with some exceeding $20 million,” said CESI Director Stephen Donahue. The device has given physicians more confidence in their abilities, and protected them from preventable risk that can result in lawsuits.

Read the full Modern Healthcare Simulation Article here!

Simulaids Unveils Industry’s First Patient Communication Simulator ALEX

alex patient communication simulator simulaids

Recently we covered the innovative ‘Next Gen Geri’ as seen at IMSH 2017 — but even more recently Simulaids unveiled the industries first “Patient Communication Simulator (PCS)”! Newly launched, ALEX recognizes questions and responds with scripted answers related to his condition allowing simulation educators to use speech synthesis or your own voice for responses. Alex is also the first patient simulator with an HD camera streaming live, low latency video from his right eye. Debrief with a patient point-of-view experience! Check out this video below to see more:


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  • Develop critical thinking, decision making and priority setting skills
  • Conduct initial patient assessments and clinical interviews
  • Acquire foundational nursing skills
  • Meet high-level simulation goals
  • Evaluate Nursing competencies in procedures such as injections, IV administration, and wound care
Core Features of Alex:
  • Breathing: Moving chest in sync with set respiratory rate. Set various respiratory profiles with varying depth of breath.
  • Airway: Oral, digital, and nasal intubation, as well as all other standard airway procedures.
  • BVM Ventilation: Rising chest measures and records airflow over time when done during CPR.
  • Circulation: Pulses (carotid x 2, brachial x 2, radial x 2 and pedal x 2): sensing touch and providing pulse sensation in sync with set heart rate and blood pressure.
  • CPR: CPR abilities with metrics of chest compression force/depth and timing. Automatic detection and logging of CPR procedures.
  • IV Injection Arm: Practice intravenous injections and positioning a butterfly catheter. Puncture veins and dorsal venous network of hand.
  • Patient Monitor: Direct control of HR, RR, SpO2 and TEMP to set target value and transition length.
  • Waveforms: Normal and abnormal simulated cardio, respiratory and SpO2 waveforms in virtual patient monitor.
  • Blood Pressure: Measure blood pressure with any sphygmomanometer attached to the included SmartCuff™, equipped with wireless pressure sensor.
  • IRISCAM: An HD camera built into the eye of ALEX, providing digital video for live streaming and recorded review. (patent pending)
  • SPEECH: Advanced speech recognition and speech synthesis to support fully automated medical interviewing exercises. (patent pending)
  • SOUNDS: Listen to normal or various abnormal lung/heart/bowel sounds and Korotkoff sounds using any stethoscope when attached to the included SmartScope™ accessory.

Simulaids began producing trauma moulage products in the town of Woodstock in 1963 and now operates out of an 83,000-square-foot facility in Saugerties New York.

Learn more about Simulaids Innovative Products on their website today!

3D Systems Announces the Release Latest 3D Virtual Reality Training Module: Simbionix SPINE Mentor

3d systems spine mentor

3DPrint.com just shared about a new Spine training simulator from 3D Systems:

Three years ago, 3D Systems joined the world of virtual reality when it acquired Simbionix, a 3D VR surgical simulation and training company, and it only took a couple of months after the acquisition for 3D Systems to announce a new Simbionix simulation module.

Over the past two years, the company has continued to add new VR simulation modules, like the Simbionix ARTHRO Mentor arthroscopic training simulator , and 3D Systems formed a partnership with CHEST last year to develop a standardized bronchoscopy curriculum with its Simbionix BRONCH Mentor. 3D Systems is committed to delivering top quality innovations in the medical field, from solid-organ scaffolds to 3D printed medical models , and today, it announced a new addition to its comprehensive line of medical simulators, with the release of the Simbionix SPINE Mentor . The hands-on simulated training and practice tool is designed for anesthesiologists, neurosurgeons, pain management surgeons, and orthopedic surgeons to train for minimally invasive spine surgeries and procedures.


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SPINE Mentor Includes:

  • 3D printed spine, which can be used for accurate palpation
  • Computer and monitor
  • Foot pedal and virtual C-arm, with controllers, which can be manipulated during practice procedures
  • Percutaneous leads
  • Two needles, one syringe, and a loss of resistance sensor upon entering epidural space
  • Realistic puncture pad

Simbionix SPINE Mentor combines a 3D printed spine, medical instruments, and virtually simulated images to create a hybrid platform that will add spinal surgery training to the company’s portfolio. It is far more accurate and realistic than training with cadavers, and was designed to practice with multiple spinal procedures, like the placement of wires and catheters and lumbar puncture; it also helps surgeons boost their confidence before a difficult procedure or surgery.