Featured Job Listing: Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist at Marian University Indianapolis

healthcare simulation technology specialist job indiana

Another awesome Simulation Technology Specialist job opportunity, this time with Marian University in Indianapolis, Indiana!

Office of Teaching Excellence and Assessment of Learning (TEAL)

Marian University seeks a Simulation Technology Specialist in Office of Teaching Excellence and Assessment of Learning to work with our College of Medicine and School of Nursing. This person assists in coordinating the technical components of the medical simulation program including pre/during/post simulation activities, collaborating with faculty on scenario development, and supporting the daily technical operations of the Simulation Center. The Simulation Technology Specialist reports to the Director of Simulation and provides technical support and maintenance of the human patient simulators, related equipment and equipment systems housed at the Simulation Center.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:

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  • Operate and maintain simulation equipment, task trainers, computerized simulators, and virtual reality procedural trainers with the ability to follow medical aspects of scenarios, and make appropriate adjustments to technology systems.
  • Operate and maintain simulation-related audio-video recording systems.
  • Facilitate simulation training and provide feedback to the Simulation Director, Course Director and/or Medical faculty.
  • Create troubleshooting documents, simulator checklists, and preventative maintenance plans for simulation equipment.
  • Provide orientation of simulation center and equipment to novice faculty and learners.
  • Perform as the technical trainer and resources liaison in the field of simulation operations.
  • Possess a high degree of comfort with computer technology; high level interpersonal skills to work with clinicians and medical staff at all levels of medical care. Provide tours of the simulation lab, providing technological demonstrate of the equipment.
  • Other duties as assigned.

Technical Skills: The ideal candidate will possess many or all of the following:

  • B-Line
  • LLEAP (non-legacy version)
  • Advanced Personal Computer Operations
  • Laerdal
  • IP Networking
  • Video Technologies
  • Canvas leaning Management System or other LMS experience
  • Lecture Capture Technologies
  • Adobe Captivate
  • Turning Point


  • Knowledge of and commitment to the mission of Marian University.
  • Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Instructional Technology, healthcare, or related field.
  • Personal accountability in addition to being innovative and creative.
  • Ability to maintain confidentiality with regards to job assignments and sensitive information.
  • Experience working with clinical software applications recommended.
  • Experience translating clinical needs into successful processes and supporting system designs.
  • Demonstrated analytic decision-making, problem-solving skills.
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills.
  • The demonstrated ability to be organized, detail oriented and highly accurate.
  • Experience with IP A/V systems and video conferencing.
  • Good mechanical aptitude and technical knowledge of computerized equipment.
  • A demonstrated ability to multi-task, work independently and build collaborative relationships in an interdisciplinary team.
  • Must be able to work an “irregular” schedule to fit the needs of internal clients.

Located within 10 minutes of downtown Indianapolis, Marian University is one of the nation’s preeminent Catholic institutions of higher learning, and ranks in the Top 25 of US News & World Report’s list of Midwest Region colleges. Marian University was founded in 1937 by the Sisters of St. Francis, Oldenburg, Indiana, and the Franciscan Values that the Sisters ingrained into the university’s culture are still prevalent today. The university has experienced tremendous growth in the past 15 years under the leadership of President Daniel J. Elsener, including the opening of the Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2013 – the state’s first new medical school in 110 years.  Marian University’s football team has captured the NAIA national championship in 2012 and 2015 in 9 years of existence. In 2016, the women’s basketball team won its first NAIA national championship. Marian University is also home to the most successful collegiate cycling program in the nation, which currently holds 33 national titles.

Review of application materials will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.   For consideration, please submit a current resume, a cover letter, and names and addresses of three current references. All materials should be submitted, together, electronically thru hr@marian.edu. No phone calls please. Marian University is an EOE

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Featured Job Listing: Simulation Technician Associate at Arizona State University

healthcare simulation arizona state university

Another featured job from our Medical Simulation Jobs page, this time for the position of Simulation Technician Associate at Arizona State University in Downtown Phoenix! Hurry the application period ends November 4th!

Requisition Id# 27273BR

Salary Range: $16.53 – $17.00 per year; DOE

Close Date: 04-November-2016

Job Description:

Provide healthcare support for experiential learning in the Simulation and Learning Resource programs. Responsible for preparing, transitioning, problem solving and maintaining healthcare simulation equipment to include but not limited to manikins, media, computers, and related materials, as well as documentation involved. Works effectively with SLR Technology Coordinator and the Simulation Nurse Faculty in the delivery of simulation education.

Essential Duties:

  • Physical set up and take down of a variety of healthcare simulation manikins and clinical lab environments with extreme attention to detail as assigned.
  • Restocks supplies in the various simulation/lab suites located in three Mercado Center buildings.
  • Assists with tours of the SLR for a variety of groups and organizations.
  • Supports staff and faculty during the planning and running of simulation events preparing, applications, props placement, and moulage set up to create a realistic healthcare setting.
  • Maintains and repairs (AV) media, computers, simulators, task trainers, and other necessary technologies utilized by the department.
  • Maintains records and supplies, equipment, and management of inventory tracking system of departmental equipment and maintenance of the assets of the Simulation & Learning Resources department.
  • Utilizes departmental specific software, databases, and websites as directed.
  • Assists with program software to model simulators’ physiological responses to instructor specifications.
  • Develops scheduling plans for repair and maintenance that accommodates the changing needs of the department.

Minimum Qualifications:

Associates degree in technology or related field AND one year experience providing information technology services; OR, three years’ experience providing information technology services; OR, any equivalent combination of experience and/or education from which comparable knowledge, skills and abilities have been achieved. Certificates from recognized programs that indicate mastery of tools and techniques relevant to the assignment may substitute for up to six months of experience.

Desired Qualifications:

  • Evidence of an Associate or Bachelor degree in healthcare technology or education.
  • Experience in healthcare simulation.
  • Evidence of effective interpersonal, organizational, planning, team-building, and problem-solving skills.
  • Evidence of effective verbal and written communication.
  • Experience in working in a team environment.
  • Experience in work that requires to attend to detail.

Working Environment:

Activities are performed in an environmentally controlled office setting subject to extended periods of sitting, keyboarding, and manipulating a computer mouse; required to stand for varying lengths of time and walk moderate distances to perform work. Occasional bending, reaching, lifting, pushing and pulling up to 25 pounds. Regular activities require ability to quickly change priorities which may include and/or are subject to resolution of conflicts. Ability to clearly communicate verbally, read, write, see and hear to perform essential functions.

Department Statement:

The College of Nursing & Health Innovation at Arizona State University is an inclusive world-class enterprise of discovery that prepares innovative, evidence-based healthcare providers, educators, leaders and researchers to optimize health in a culturally diverse global community.

ASU Statement:

Arizona State University is a new model for American higher education, an unprecedented combination of academic excellence, entrepreneurial energy and broad access. This New American University is a single, unified institution comprising four differentiated campuses positively impacting the economic, social, cultural and environmental health of the communities it serves. Its research is inspired by real world application blurring the boundaries that traditionally separate academic disciplines. ASU serves more than 90,000 students in metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, the nation’s fifth largest city. ASU champions intellectual and cultural diversity, and welcomes students from all fifty states and more than one hundred nations across the globe.

ASU is a tobacco-free university. For details visit www.asu.edu/tobacco free. AmeriCorps, Peace Corps, and other national service alumni are encouraged to apply. Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. ASU conducts pre-employment screening which may include verification of work history, academic credentials, licenses, and certifications. Fingerprint Check Statement: This position is considered safety/security sensitive and will include a fingerprint check. Employment is contingent upon successful passing of the fingerprint check.

Instructions to Apply:

Application deadline is 3:00PM Arizona time on the date indicated. Please include all employment information in month/year format (e.g., 6/88 to 8/94), job title, job duties and name of employer for each position. Resume should clearly illustrate how prior knowledge and experience meets the Minimum and Desired qualifications of this position. ASU does not pay for travel expenses associated with interviews, unless otherwise indicated. Only electronic applications are accepted for this position.

To apply please click here or visit to www.asu.edu/asujobs/ click “External Applicant” under Staff job opportunities, see Req Id# 27273BR

Aeromedical Evacuation Crews Score Their First Flight Simulators

Aeromedical Evacuation Crews Score Their First Flight Simulators

Combining aviation and healthcare simulation into one experience? That’s the power of working with CAE Healthcare! In today’s story we share how the Air Force is combing simulation experiences for both aviation and healthcare crews:

In the back of a C-130 Hercules, a woman is giving birth. Like many other women, she is confused and nervous during the process, lashing out when a nurse touches her arm and anxiously calling out for her baby after delivering.

As lifelike as the scenario is, almost everything about the situation is fake, from the aircraft itself — actually a training system meant to replicate the fuselage of the C-130 — to the woman, a mannequin capable of blinking, speech and delivering a small mannequin baby. To the military nurses and medical technicians taking care of the clockwork woman and her newborn, this is as close to real as they can possibly get until they’re face-to-face with a human patient.

Air Force pilots typically practice their skills via ground-based fuselage trainers, as do many specialized crew positions like the C-17 loadmasters responsible for air dropping supplies. But until just recently, aeromedical personnel were forced to rely on either flight-based training or less immersive ground-based simulations where they would act out scenarios in a normal classroom, said Lt. Col. Chad Corliss, deputy commander of the 94th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron.

Supported Organization:

Sim Program Funding Sources & Models – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 2

funding models for healthcare simulation

Last week we publicly launched that the highly praised HealthySimAdmin video series with Part 1: Collaborative simulation program development. Today we continue our ongoing exploration of how to start and expand a healthcare simulation program with Part 2 of HealthySimAdmin: Funding sources & models, initial and ongoing — which you can now watch for free below!

It’s all about the money! One of our panel experts will lead our conversation into the topic of how to find and continue the funding necessary to operate modern day clinical education/training facilities and programs. A recent survey of institutions utilizing medical simulation found that more than half do not have an ongoing operational annual budget! How can we plan for success without gaining the financial support necessary? Medical Simulation Consultants on our panel have helped countless simulation programs identify funding priorities and development successful Return-OnInvestment strategies. Discussion will include considerations for both single to multi-lab or in-situ simulation budgets.

After this presentation, the HSA panel of experts continued the conversation discussing collaborative funding models, initial capital vs. ongoing overhead costs, grant and donor opportunities, short and long-term budget projections, hidden costs, pitfalls to avoid as well as cost saving techniques. Audience question and answer session to follow. In this session we will learn what funding methods the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts utilized to successfully develop and operate simulation center spaces, staff and equipment.

Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN is Dean of the School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She was a developer of the CSCLV and serves on its Advisory Committee. Dr. Yucha earned her academic credentials from the State University of New York system: her BS in Nursing from the University at Albany, her MS in Nursing from the University at Buffalo, and her PhD in Physiology from Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse NY. She worked at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the University of Florida before moving to Las Vegas. Dr. Yucha has received research funding from the National Institutes of Health, has published numerous articles, and is editor of a scientific journal, Biological Research for Journal.

Dr. Yucha was instrumental in creating the original concept of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. She worked with architects to design the space and worked closely with other Deans to develop the curriculum, staffing, and financial model to sustain the center. She serves on the Advisory Committee for the CSCLV.

COL John G. McManus, MD, MCR, FAAEM, FACEP is retired from the military with a combined Federal service record of over 24 years from the United States Army as a Medical Corps Officer and decorated combat veteran. After graduating from North Georgia Senior Military College in 1988 with a B.S. in chemistry on a full National Guard Scholarship, COL McManus attended his M.D. training at Georgia Health Sciences University serving as student government president his final year in 1992. Since then, Dr. McManus has served on active duty in numerous assignments and deployments (Bosnia, Kuwait, Iraq) throughout the world. COL McManus completed a 4 year emergency medicine residency in 1999 at Madigan Army Medical Center and University of Washington, an EMS fellowship at Oregon Health and Sciences University and a Master Degree in Clinical Research. Furthermore, he is expected to graduate with an MBA this summer. He possesses a thorough understanding of medical device research, development practices, training as well as deployment logistics (particularly with Department of Defense). His research focus included trauma and combat casualty care research at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research and in Iraq and Afghanistan focusing on pre-hospital, disaster and critical care medicine. He is an internationally recognized researcher and speaker with over 500 presentations and accomplished author of over 100 scientific publications.

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Teaching Patient Handoffs to Medical Students in OB/GYN: Simulation Curriculum and Assessment Tool

mededportal simulation

MedEdPortal, a division of AAMC, just released this healthcare simulation curriculum and assessment tool for those teaching patient handoffs to medical students in OB/GYN. You must be a subscriber to the website to get the full toolkit.


Patient handoffs, the communications required for the safe transfer of patient care, are known to be a common source of medical errors. Simulation exercises are effective techniques for teaching the procedures and patient interaction skills involved in a handoff. We developed a teaching tool that allows students to individually interact with a simulated patient, develop a treatment plan, and practice a handoff to another provider. The curriculum is a flexible instructional tool to teach patient handoffs in the context of a simulated obstetric emergency for learners at the clerkship through first-year obstetrics and gynecology resident levels. The curriculum secondarily teaches management of first-trimester bleeding with acute blood loss and can be adapted to allow advanced learners to practice obtaining informed consent.

To evaluate this simulation for educational effectiveness, we developed a faculty observation assessment tool. The simulation assessments for history taking, fund of knowledge, and interpersonal skills were predictive of subsequent clerkship clinical grades. Eighty percent of students agreed the exercise was realistic, 95% agreed it was relevant to the clinical curriculum, 90% agreed the simulation taught handoff skills, and 73% agreed the simulation increased confidence in handoff skills. Students uniformly found the curriculum to be relevant, realistic, and effective at teaching handoff skills. Use of this curriculum has the potential to improve students’ communication skills, handoff performance, and confidence during an obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. The assessment tool may allow early identification of students in need of improvement in communication skills.

Read the full article and get the toolset here on MedEdPortal!

Poverty Simulation Helps Shape Future Healthcare Professionals

poverty simulation

Has your nursing program considered running a poverty simulation? Help your healthcare learners not only see the benefits of simulation outside the lab context, but also better understand the difficulties faced by less fortunate members of your community. Here’s how NDSU is using simulation to teach their nursing students about poverty:

Students at the NDSU School of Nursing at Sanford Health in Bismarck will get a glimpse into how a family in poverty navigates the complexities of life. More than 60 senior nursing students are scheduled to take part in a poverty simulation experience at Bismarck State College.

During the simulation, the nursing students will role-play the lives of low-income families, from single parents trying to care for their children to senior citizens trying to maintain their self-sufficiency on Social Security. The task of each family is to provide food, shelter and other basic necessities while interacting with various community resources.

Brittney Mueller, simulation coordinator at NDSU School of Nursing at Sanford Health, said the goal is to enable participants to view poverty from different angles and begin to understand what life is like with a shortage of money over an extended period of time. “As nurses embark on their careers, they will one day work with patients facing difficult decisions on a regular basis,” said Mueller. “Deciding whether to buy food or pay for health care is something that some people may face on a monthly basis.

Aviation’s Black Boxes Are Coming to Healthcare Training

black boxes in healthcare

This summer I was thrilled to provide the SESAM closing plenary address where I shared the past, present and future of healthcare simulation — and made direct calls for healthcare to integrate a “blackbox” into healthcare. The argument is simple: recording devices have been successfully improving aviation training and performance outcomes since the 1970s — and in a day and age where police body cameras are becoming affordable for every single officer, clearly healthcare is on a similar path. Today here is more support for such a conversation from Richard Corder, Partner at Wellesley Partners which provides Executive Coaching in Boston and throughout the Northeast:

There are many industries, other than healthcare, that work in complex environments where the actions of one human can impact the life of another. Healthcare leaders need to acknowledge the reality that we have much to learn from other industries. While we cannot mimic others entirely, the same general operating principles (including mindfulness that serves as the overarching organizational spirit) that are the foundation for other high reliability organizations (i.e.: aviation, nuclear power) can work just as well to prevent harm from occurring in health systems.

One example of a safe practice or technology that could shared across industries is the in-flight data recorder found on all commercial airliners. It was because of the in-flight data recorder on board the two Boeing 747s that crashed into one another on the island of Tenerife in 1977 that we learned so much about the decisions and behaviors resulting in that game-changing airline disaster.  The time stamped voice commands of those at the controls were captured in real-time, and provided a blueprint of what “not to do” along with a snapshot of what needed to be changed.

Now envision this: following a surgical procedure, regardless of the outcome, we have the opportunity to review every piece of data related to the procedure.

Read the full article on Healthcare Executives Network

Healthcare Education Training Expands MedSim Magazine Content

medsim magazine

Halldale’s MedSim Magazine has expanded its focus into a new group called “Healthcare Training And Education”, which features a recently launched website. While no longer specifically focusing on healthcare simulation like HealthySimulation.com, the resource does cover medical simulation topics while also covering topics relevant to the larger topic of improving healthcare training.

About HTE

The mission of Healthcare Training and Education (HTE) has become to be one of the leading sources of Healthcare, Training and Education information by providing an unprecedented level of value to our customers through quality, relevant and timely content.

Preparing the Next Generation of Healthcare Professionals

HTE aspires to promote the best education and training practices for the next generation of healthcare professionals. Experienced professionals in medicine, simulation and training write our content to address the needs of medical practitioners, educators and academics around the world. HTE features innovative healthcare practice information such as the latest simulations developed to train different medical professionals at different stages of their education. It also covers curriculum advancement to highlight the knowledge and skills needed to ensure patient safety and reduce healthcare costs.

Your Comprehensive Source for the Latest Healthcare News and Opportunities

In addition to our original content, HTE is your comprehensive source for a variety of other important healthcare industry tools and resources including conferences and career opportunties

A Division of The Halldale Group

Halldale is a modeling, simulation and training company in the B2B media space. Our company is unique by having a global team of expert writers who are also simulation and training experts. Halldale’s editorial team comprises of practicing medical training experts and ex-simulation industry professionals. Halldale has a dedicated publishing and event team working around the world.

Learn more at HealthcareTrainingAndEducation.com!

Collaborative Simulation Program Development – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 1

expanding a medical simulation program

Last week we announced that the highly praised HealthySimAdmin video series is being made publicly available for the first time. Today we post Part 1: Collaborative simulation program development, across institutions and disciplines, which you can watch below:

Imagine splitting the cost of a brand new simulation center and operational program in thirds, while simultaneously increasing access to equipment, space and staff support. Now also consider the benefits of partnering with other healthcare professional disciplines to further breakdown the traditional educational training silos through your simulation program. Dean Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN from UNLV’s Nursing and Allied Health Programs will launch our discussion into how to develop a multi-disciplinary multi-institutional collaborative simulation center. Dean Yucha spent three years leading the development of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas, which supports the clinical education of three distinct institutions across a multitude of disciplines. Following Dean Yucha’s presentation, the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts will continue the discussion of related topics such as stakeholder identification and board/committee needs, types of umbrella administrative structures, architectural design considerations, financial reimbursement systems, building and program support services, legal requirements, ongoing collaborative issues and more. Funding models will be touched upon briefly but will be explored in greater depth during subsequent sessions. Audience question and answer sessions will follow the lecture and panel discussion. In summary, in this session we will learn how to build and continue a successful collaborative partnership for a medical simulation program.

About the Presenter

Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN is Dean of the School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She was a developer of the CSCLV and serves on its Advisory Committee. Dr. Yucha earned her academic credentials from the State University of New York system: her BS in Nursing from the University at Albany, her MS in Nursing from the University at Buffalo, and her PhD in Physiology from Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse NY. She worked at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the University of Florida before moving to Las Vegas. Dr. Yucha has received research funding from the National Institutes of Health, has published numerous articles, and is editor of a scientific journal, Biological Research for Journal.

Dr. Yucha was instrumental in creating the original concept of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. She worked with architects to design the space and worked closely with other Deans to develop the curriculum, staffing, and financial model to sustain the center. She serves on the Advisory Committee for the CSCLV.

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The Newest Medical Simulation Center Designs May Surprise You!

designing a sim center

Looking for inspiration for your new sim center? Check out these four new simulation buildings, including a very innovative design from Columbia University:

1) The Vagelos Education Center, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler (as Executive Architect), is a new medical and graduate education building at Columbia University’s Medical Center. The building’s design—which weaves together state-of-the-art medical simulation clinics and labs, tech-enabled classrooms, communal areas for study and socializing, and event spaces—reflects how medicine is taught, learned, and practiced in the 21st century.

Learn more about the Vagelos Education Center at Columbia University

2) The Stephen F. Austin State University Richard and Lucille Dewitt School of nursing is one of only three facilities in Texas that has an onsite simulation lab: The Ed and Gwen Cole Simulation Laboratory, a Laerdal Center of Educational Excellence. The simulation lab is 9,000 square feet with a 10-bed medical surgical area, labor and delivery area, nursery and neonatal area, health assessment lab and an emergency room area. Real medical equipment like IV pumps and crash carts add to the reality of the simulation lab. “It’s a bridge between what we teach the students in class and actual clinical, face-to-face, live humans,” David Smith, coordinator of the simulation lab and clinical instructor, said. “It gives the students a chance to put into practice what they’re learning in class in a risk-free environment.”

Learn more about the new Austin State Sim Lab

3) Hibbing Community College: Over the past three years, Hibbing Community College has developed their new hi-tech Healthcare Simulation Center. They have three rooms that include two clinic bays, an OB and ICU unit, a homecare area, and an infectious control setup. “It’s just cutting edge. It’s preparing students for future practice and it’s real life right in front of them,” said the Director of Nursing, Sandy Gustafson. The health center features high-fidelity mannequins that breathe, have pulses and heart tones, and one even simulates child birth. Students get the hands-on experience they wouldn’t get just by watching in a real hospital setting.

Learn more about the Hibbing Community College Sim Center

4) St. Clair County Community College: The students were working in the newly renovated health simulation labs in the AJ Theisen Building. The renovation is the result of a $350,000 project that combined older medical and surgical simulation equipment with new tools and moved them to the annex of the Theisen Building. Having students work in simulation labs, in which the verbal manikin have pulses and students can hear their hearts and lungs, is not exactly a new concept for SC4 — they have been doing this for the past six years. However, the old simulation lab was in the basement of the Clara E. Mackenzie Building and in a less realistic setting.

Learn more about the St. Clair County Simulation Building