Virtual and Augmented Reality Market To Reach $162 billion by 2020

virtual-reality-utilization-engagement

Sim Champs before you know it AR and VR technologies will become a mandatory part of our healthcare educational programs. The opportunities to learn and train in high-cost risk-heavy environments in a safe and affordable manner will continue to expand through advanced learning technologies like augmented and virtual reality. HealthySim will continue to report tidbits of progress in this arena as its applications to healthcare become ever clearer. Today, we share the expectations of the industries growth to demonstrate the upward trend in utilization:

BusinessInsider.com reports that the total revenue for virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) is projected to increase from $5.2 billion in 2016 to over $162 billion in 2020, according to the IDC:


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  • More than half of the revenue will come from VR/AR hardware sales. Additionally, service revenues are projected to increase over the period as demand grows for enterprise-class support. Software was also mentioned as a smaller, but notable revenue source, growing more than 200% year-over-year (YoY) in 2016. Nevertheless, services revenue will quickly surpass it, largely due to demand in the enterprise segment.
  • AR systems will ultimately contribute more revenue than VR systems. Games and paid content will be strong sources of revenue for VR systems, particularly in the next two years. However, this revenue will be eclipsed as AR systems are integrated into healthcare, product design and management-related uses.
  • Most revenue through 2020 will come from the US. The US, Western Europe, and Asia Pacific (excluding Japan) are projected to account for three-quarters of revenue for VR and AR. The US is projected to contribute a larger amount as time progresses.

The adoption of AR and VR headsets will be driven primarily by the introduction of less expensive models to the market, first powered by smartphones before mainstream adoption of stand-alone headsets. While early adopters will drive the initial wave of purchasing, sustainable growth will likely come from VR and AR app developers building a robust and engaging ecosystem of content that entices slower adopters. Lastly, as the underlying technology powering these devices increases, so too will the capabilities, creating new use cases in entertainment, workplaces, and education.

Read the full Market Report on BusinessInsider


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Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare Updates

aspih uk simulation conference 2016

A few updates from our friends at ASPiH!

The 2016 ASPiH UK November Bristol Conference Agenda Brochure has been posted, with keynote announcement by Dr. John Vozenilek MD, FACEP. Chief Medical Officer Jump Simulation and Education Centre University of Illinois. This is a multidisciplinary conference focusing on the latest research, technologies and applications of simulated practice 15th-17th November 2016 at the Mercure Grand Hotel in Bristol.

ASPiH and the Chartered Institute for Ergonomics and Human Factors (CIEHF) are pleased to announce a series of co-designed one day workshops to help illustrate and enhance the integration of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) methodologies within health care education and delivery.

Thursday 29th September 2016 – Glasgow Crowne Plaza
Tuesday 15th November 2016 – Bristol Mercure Grande

Each event will feature presentation of different case studies to enable participants to consider the techniques used in more depth and gain an appreciation of the application of HFE across a range of health care contexts and purposes. We are in discussion with CIEHF regarding options for publishing a report or summary paper that will feature selected case studies for wider circulation to policy makers, regulators, commissioners, and professional bodies in healthcare.

Finally, membership to the ASPiH website has been upgraded with the following opportunities:

  • Discounted registration fee at the annual ASPiH Conference
  • Discount with selected affiliate organisations
  • Subsidised fees at selected UK regional events
  • Reduced rates for ASPiH delivered or supported training courses
  • Reduced subscription rate for the BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning Journal
  • Opportunity to be involved with ASPiH Special Interest Groups (SIGS) relevant to expertise/speciality
  • Eligible for being invited to Chair positions in SIGS and for membership of the Executive committee
  • Opportunity to promote job vacancies free of charge on the ASPiH website
  • Communications Receive direct email notices and quarterly e-Newsletter from ASPiH
  • Receive the ASPiH Annual Report summarising the Associations’ member-driven activities and key initiatives
  • Connect with other members and experts via our community

Visit ASPiH’s website for more great resources from UK’s leading Simulation Organization!

Ontario’s SIMone 2016 October Sim Expo Agenda Revealed!

sim expo 2016

Spots are filling up quickly for Canada’s premier healthcare simulation conference — Half, one and 2-day rates are available. Don’t miss the Opening Reception on October 5. This Industry-Sponsored Reception will feature Dr. Nicole Harder as a keynote speaker. Happy to share with you the great lineup of interactive workshops and agenda for the 2016 SIM Expo taking place on October 5-7 at the Intercontinental Toronto Centre Hotel.

The conference is packed with something for everyone. Don’t miss:

  • Virtual Simulation Showcase
  • Simulation in Action
  • Simulation Awards Presentation
  • Networking Events & Opportunities
  • Industry-Sponsored Reception
  • Edu-Gaming Den
  • Poster & Video Crawl
  • Interactive Workshops & many more!

About SIM-one

SIM-one is a not-for-profit organization that connects the simulation community, facilities, and resources. SIM-one advocates for and advances simulated learning in health professions education for the benefit of patient care and safety. SIM-one offers advanced educational training and online services that are open to simulationists and health professionals across the globe.

View the full 2016 SimONE program here!


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Lance Baily To Support the Launch of New Preterm Simulator from SimCharacters

preterm simulator

Sim Champs it must be clear by now that as the Founder of HealthySimulation, SimGHOSTS and other simulation-based resources that I have a passion for the technological innovation of the healthcare simulation industry. I truly believe in the power of this methodology and technology to help improve learning and patient safety outcomes. Happy to announce today that I will be working for the next few months as a “Marketing and Strategy Consultant” with the Austrian-based company SimCharacters to help with the launch of their new High Emotion preterm simulator, Paul.

This summer while traveling between SESAM and SimGHOSTS events I had the opportunity to come through Vienna to meet with the SimCharacters team, who are located in the same offices as SimStation. I was amazed how these two companies and their partners and leveraged two decades of experience to connect development, project management, clinical education, video production, website, and media production facility design into a powerful collaborative group.

Founded by Neonatologist and Simulation Trainer Dr. Jens-Christian Schwindt, the new company brings together a wonderful team of mechanical/electrical engineers, movie special effects and makeup artists, software developers, clinical educators, and business entrepreneurs that I immediately connected with. Having seen the latest prototype of the Paul High Emotion Simulator, I can attest that this powerful new technology will massively enhance the learning opportunities of neonate teams around the world like nothing we have seen before.

As usual, keep following @HealthySim on twitter for daily simulation resources and visit SimGHOSTS for upcoming announcements about their 2017 hands-on simulation technology training conferences.

I’ll be sharing more updates about this project as we near January’s IMSH 2017 but for now be sure to follow SimCharacters on Facebook where more english translated articles are coming soon!

7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 2

7 highest medical simulation articles

Last week we covered the first half of “7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program“, following our series of articles which cover the “business side” of selling the tool of simulation to higher levels of administration. Other topics from this series included the “Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget” and “3 Key Resources to Expand Your simulation Program“.

Today we finish up with the second half of steps necessary to be affective in starting or expanding your simulation program, with examples from my time as Director of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. In two years we were able to secure a quarter of a millions dollars in external business contracts providing simulation services to local, regional, and international groups. Miss the first part of this article, click here to start at the beginning which covers gaining support, building a program, and seizing opportunities.

4. Market Your Program

Once you have built a program plan that has potential to secure internal or external clients, your team will need to establish a marketing plan. First and foremost your department should Build a Medical Simulation Program Website, rich with multimedia. If available, work with your institution’s media department to help build and craft multimedia materials such as flyers, websites and pages, pictures, videos, and social media outlets. Learn more here about “How to Add Multimedia to Your Simulation Program“.

Designing effective marketing materials is a skill set that you or your team members may not naturally have at your disposal. There are countless resource materials for learning these skill sets such as 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People, but suffice to say your messaging should be clear, coherent, simple, and professional. With print material, use a maximum of three different fonts, and three different colors. Provide critical course, event, or program details relevant to capturing interest and providing key details such as dates, times, links, abstracts, and learning opportunities. Simplify “learning objectives” to 9 words or less, and use both paragraph and bullet point text formats for key content. (Psychological studies have shown that some people will only read paragraphs in advertisements, while others will only read bullet points). Images help to tell a story as “pictures are worth a thousand words”. If that is true then video is worth a million — but only if it is done professionally without shakey cameras, bad audio, or confusing editing!

Test your marketing messages by showing it to colleagues for feedback, but remember that your customer will be your greatest asset when it comes to learning from your created materials. Check out an example of simulation training courses in this recent CSCLV flyer. Can you spot some areas for improvement? What catches your eye? What areas distract you? Be sure to include call to actions that demonstrate the limited availability of your program, cost saving registration deadlines, other incentives like discounts for groups or longer campaigns as well as next steps like online registration or email contact.

Don’t forget about Social Media in relevant professional domains like twitter, youtube, and LinkedIn. Social Media Overload: Simple Social Media Strategies For Overwhelmed and Time Deprived Businesses is a good primer on how to effectively utilize social media for your marketing campaigns.

Finally — attend regional or national conferences and share your marketing materials on available pin boards or tables for external users, or on department cafeteria signs, newsletters, or other group sharing events for internal users.

5. Provide Quality

Remember that internal and external users of your simulation program are in essence your “customers”. We all know what happens when we have a bad experience at a store, restaurant, or movie — we don’t return and we let others know about it. Providing a high quality event, course, or learning opportunity is a crucial part of building a simulation program. The more realistic your environments, the more tested your simulation scenarios, the better the food you serve, the easier the directions to your facility, the more people will enjoy your program and the happier they will be with the experience.

This kind of experience is crucial for step 6, but before we get there, consider the experience you are providing by “trying it on” and imaging yourself with no prior knowledge about the activity. Or better yet, act as a customer and trial run all the various systems in place for your program. What areas do you find lacking in service, quality, or professionalism? Every detail matters when it comes to satisfying the learners, groups, and individuals that come through your program. You or your leadership should sit in on some or all of the first programs to see how things are working and gain first hand experience on what needs to be improved.

6. Gather Feedback & Testimonials

This is one of the most important steps to building a long-term successful simulation program. By gathering direct honest feedback from your participants you will be better able to learn what went right, but more importantly, what went wrong. Try not to lead the witness but ask open ended questions on top of “scale of 1-5” questions that cover the most crucial aspects of the program. By quickly sharing this feedback with your team you can incorporate new solutions to address key problems.

While working in Hollywood I learned that during test screenings of new films, producers cared most about the question “Would you recommend this movie to your friends?”. This is a crucial question that ultimately demonstrates the value of your program because individuals will only encourage others to also participate if they feel it will add social value to their relationship status because of the benefits it will bring their colleagues. In other words, is your simulation program “share worthy”? Be ready to capture some of the feedback you receive to utilize as testimonials for future participants and program marketing. Obviously you will need to secure permission to share feedback as testimonials, so talk to your legal team to see what kind of waiver will suffice. Use these testimonials in your future marketing material design, as future users weigh such reviews more heavily than other types of messaging, simply because it reduces the risk of “going first”.

7. Learn, Improve and Grow

With honest feedback you can tweak your smaller programs for better efficiency and outcomes, preparing you for larger growth opportunities in the future. Those making investments into your program, whether its external users or the CEO of your hospital, will be moved farther faster with proven results with budgets already allocated. Becoming a cost-reduction program through improved learning and patient care outcomes enables you to increase budgets for future innovative practices. Dr. John “Voz” Vozenilek shared at SimGHOSTS 2016 USA during the EMS SimulationIQ sponsored keynote address how the Jump Trading Simulation Center is doing this very thing.

Other areas that will help your program grow are “Kaizen” Events To Increase Efficiency & Outcomes, the ability to negotiate with others to ensure maximum return on investment, and always being open to new opportunities. However, remember that after you have built a successful program, some smaller activities may no longer provide enough return on investment for your program’s growth to warrant the time and energy necessary to do such work. For example at the CSCLV, some UNLV students wanted to utilize the simulation center to film their senior project. We allowed them to use the space only to find out later they had damaged some equipment. Without insurance, we had to eat the cost of repairing that equipment with no value added to our center’s portfolio.

 

Hear what other simulation center directors have done to increase sales of their program’s services by watching the HealthySimAdmin series — free for HealthySimulation.com Newsletter Subscribers!

DextaRobotics Builds Hand Haptics Device for Virtual Reality Medical Learning

simulated learning in vr

One of the limitations of current virtual reality systems is the lack of tactile feel when engaging with realistic learning environments. Angleing a scalpel, inserting an NG tube, feeling a pulse — all of these critical skills that require touch to learn and perform properly. where touch Without a doubt physical touch technology will have to become integrated into advanced technologies in-order to maximize learning outcomes. Recently, Dexta Robotics released a product which is taking a giant leap forward into the touch of VR. Check out the video to see the prototype in action:

About Dexmo

Compared to other force feedback devices, Dexmo is very light. It can run on battery power and work wirelessly for a relatively long time. Dexmo captures 11 DoF of users’ hand motion. The mechanical linkage nature makes the readings much more robust compared to IMUs. The force feedback ability allows the user to feel the size and shape of any digital object, which greatly improves immersion. Variable stiffness is achieved by precise motor control. With this feature, each virtual object can have their own stiffness. In the past two years we have made over 20 iterations of Dexmo and tested numerous force feedback methods. These valuable experiences helped us build a better human-machine-interaction tool.

Learn more about the Dexmo on the DextaRobotics Website

Updates from SimGHOSTS, The Leaders in Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Support

sim tech conference

SimGHOSTS recently wrapped their 2016 global events in the United States, Australia, and in the United Kingdom (with their partner ASPiH). Check out these awesome updates from the world’s leading non-profit organization supporting healthcare simulation technology specialists.

Remember there is still 50% discounted annual subscription to SimGHOSTS.org to celebrate their recent affiliation with INACSL. Subscribe today to gain access to the course library, and watch all the recorded sessions from the SimGHOSTS 2016 events!

MedicActiV from France-Based SimForHealth Showcased at Stanford MedicineX

simhealth france medicactiv

SimforHealth is an international start-up with offices in Canada and headquarters in France which brings together healthcare professionals, education expert and 3D engineers to create virtual training solutions for medical education. SimforHealth is recognized by BPI France as one of the 2,000 most innovative companies in France in 2016.

SimforHealth has created MedicActiV,the first digital simulation platform dedicated to health training. It was created to meet the initial and continuing needs of health professionals for e-service training, on site or remotely. They believe many healthcare professionals is that virtual clinical cases can provide an important complementary, innovative contribution to the overall training process. It is an essential link between theory and the reality in the field MedicActiV seeks to disseminate this technology and innovative approach to education as widely as possible through collaboration.

Are you near California this week? MedicActiV has been selected for a device demo in the Tech Tent (On Friday September 16th – Ten on Alumni Lawn 2:40PM-3:40PM. During the demo their team will show how MedicActiV is a really good solution to improve the international medical education by virtual clinical cases. You can download the MedX event agenda here.

Learn more about SimForHealthMedicActiV and the Stanford MedicineX Conference!

ABC Covers Hillsborough Community College’s New Simulation Suite

medical simulation news story

Check out this local news story from ABC about the The  which has just created a “Simulation Suite.” The new lab is designed to look and feel like a real hospital, and gives students the chance to perform medical produces and diagnoses on dummy patients.

Hillsborough Community College (HCC) is now home to a fully functional, state-of-the-art health sciences simulation suite. Designed to simulate a hospital setting, the HCC simulation suite allows students to apply classroom concepts within a simulated clinical environment. Florida’s aging population is growing and so is the demand for the healthcare professionals who care for them. The simulation suite is currently being used to train respiratory, EMS and nursing students.

The students use life-sized, anatomically correct manikins in a number of settings to simulate a number of situations including, but not limited to, trauma with bleeding, childbirth and chest pain with cardiac arrest. According to the Florida Center for Nursing, “Statewide estimates for vacant nurse positions in the industries studied have increased since the 2013 survey with nearly 12,500 vacant RN positions, 2,654 vacant LPN positions, and 3,111 vacant CNA positions as of June 30, 2015.” This simulation suite will help train and prepare the next generation of professionals to provide care for patients.

“I can practice this and the mannequin is not going to judge me,” said Molly Gonzalez with a smile. On Wednesday, Gonzalez and her classmates got to use the lab for the first time since it was completed this summer. These kinds of labs are a popular training tool for colleges across the country, so if the HCC’s students were going to compete, the school needed to upgrade. Having the simulation lab now allows these students to get quality EMS and nursing education at community college prices. And gets them to working in this in-demand field very quickly.

Learn How to Gain Similar Media Attention for Your Sim Lab!

7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 1

growing a simulation program

This month we have been covering key business considerations your simulation teams needs to have in place to build or expand your program. Previous articles in this series include the “Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget” and “3 Key Resources to Expand Your simulation Program“.

In today’s article I share how as the Director of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas, I was able to secure $250,000 in external business contracts in just two years. These additional funds helped the center hire additional staff and purchases new equipment. So, note that although this article focuses on external contracts, a lost of the materials presented here will also help you expand your simulation services to internal departments within your institution.

The discussion focuses on 7 key areas necessary to create a successful sales funnel for your simulation services, the first 3 of which we will cover today:

  1. Gaining support
  2. Building a program
  3. Seizing opportunities
  4. Marketing yourself
  5. Providing quality services
  6. Securing feedback
  7. Perfecting systems.

1. Gain Support

Before building an external simulation program, I knew I would need to gain the support of the executive leadership of our department to spend time and energy focusing on clients outside our internal stakeholders. At the CSCLV this leadership was the Deans of the collaborative schools sharing the space (all of whom were under the roof of the Nevada System of Higher Education UNLV, NSC, and UNSOM).

After our first year of utilization I was able to show the deans that our center’s spaces were not being utilized during many nights and weekends. This was followed up by the reminder of an opportunity to “rent” those spaces to groups that may be interested in training healthcare learners or being in a healthcare looking facility without actual patients. The deans agreed that an exploration of external business development could help to cover the costs not only for the staff time needed to manage those engagements, but additional staff time to help our own programs and also pay for new equipment in the future when needed.

The deans reminded me that I would need to get permission for a special account from the State system to take in revenue, and that I would need to generate a contract template for external users to protect the center — one that included a demand for proof of insurance by the external programs to cover any accidents. Following this I met with the Center’s legal support out of UNLV to address all of these concerns in-order to get the final sign off on starting an external program.

2. Build a Program

The most important thing to remember when starting the development of a new simulation program, internal or external, is to start small. By creating a successful program that is manageable and repeatable, your team can “rinse and repeat” on cruise control while reserving development energies for bigger projects. Remember that teams fatigue by new information, new processes, new technologies, and new systems. By aiming too high in the beginning, we risk exhausting ourselves and our programs. With a smaller program, we can be sure not to extend our resources too far too quickly and burn out. Remember, the longterm success of the program is the goal — and smaller steps will help us to build upon our achievements and ultimately move farther, faster.

This mindset helped our team pick our first external client, the ATLS course from the County Hospital next door. The group was looking for a new host to provide the space for the training, and store the materials necessary for the courses. Their educators would provide the training, and the local marketing. Our team would store their equipment, provide them space, provide additional marketing, and secure a small fee for our work.

This 2-day smaller program enabled our team to work through hundreds of issues that came up without overwhelming us from our “8 to 5” work for internal users of our simulation program. Items like catering, collecting payments, scheduling, contracts, and security concerns were addressed during the 2 months leading up to the first event. How we would deal with parking and directions to the room itself needed to be considered! Profits from this program were small at just about $1500 per weekend event.

Obviously we learned a great deal from the first program at the Center which we incorporated in future events (more on this later). The important thing to note here is that following this course we could now handle bigger, longer, and more expensive programs for external clients. Following this we launched simulation based training courses in partnership with an external consultant that lasted 4-5 days and required a great deal more support by our team for simulation experiences, marketing, and administration. Profits from these events increased to about $6,000 per event.

Following the successful completion of several such trainings, we were ready for multi-week programs with local hospitals and private schools that ended up generating $50,000+ contracts. Had we started from nothing to this high level of service I am sure we would have failed to provide high quality programs which are necessary to ensure supporting long-term relationships and positive testimonials, while minimizing staff stress levels.

3. Seize Opportunities

Consider what makes your simulation program special? What services can your team, center, program provide that internal stakeholders or external clients may need? Think small and think big: what local groups could benefit from ongoing long-term training engagements and what international groups would visit your center for one-off specialized training programs? What equipment does your program already have access to which is rare? Are you located in a travel destination?

The CSCLV is located in Las Vegas, which means that it can attract individuals from around the world that are interested in gaining necessary CEUs/CMUs while traveling to a fun location. What unique opportunities does your equipment, faculty, program, and city offer to potential clients?

Another benefit of Las Vegas is its close proximity to Hollywood, which helped Our Sim Center Have Its Most Profitable Day Ever. Production companies will pay big bucks to rent facilities that look like clinical locations but that don’t have real patients to worry about.

Knowing what you can offer local, regional, national, and international clients will enable you to identify and build programs which will speak to and attract new business to your program.

Are you interested in a deeper dive into these topics?

Check out the 8 recorded sessions from the HealthySimAdmin event for free after Subscribing to the HealthySim Monthly Newsletter!

Next week we will move on Part 2 of this article, which provides us with 4 more insights necessary to grow your simulation program: Marketing, Delivery, Feedback and Growth!