Microsoft Improves Healthcare Education with Launch of HoloLens Augmented Reality Glasses

hololens

Have you heard about the release of the Hololens from Microsoft yet? This oculus-like device will enable healthcare educators with a plethora of new tools to educate learners with the latest in virtual and augmented reality programs. Navigate anatomy, workspaces, and educational programs in 3d spaces. Track motion and spatial mapping to better learn how learners interact with learning programs. Watch this Microsoft demonstration by School of Medicine Dean Pamela Davis who shows how using holograms to teach anatomy dramatically enhances and accelerates learning:

About Microsoft HoloLens:



Microsoft HoloLens is the first fully untethered holographic computer running Windows 10. It is completely untethered–no wires, phones, or connection to a PC needed. Microsoft HoloLens allows you to place holograms in your physical environment and provides a new way to see your world.

Microsoft HoloLens generates a multi-dimensional image visible to a user so that he or she perceives holographic objects in the physical world. Holographic objects seen with Microsoft HoloLens can be placed in physical locations you choose, move according to their own rules, or remain in a specific location regardless of where you are or in which direction you are looking.

The holograms you’ll see with Microsoft HoloLens can appear life-like, and can move, be shaped, and change according to interaction with you or the physical environment in which they are visible. Use gestures to create, shape, and size holograms. Use your gaze to navigate and explore. Use your voice to communicate with your apps. Microsoft HoloLens understands your movements, gaze, and voice, enabling you to interact with content and information naturally. Using holograms, you can place your digital content, such as apps, information, and even multi-dimensional videos, in the physical space around you, so you can interact with it.

Learn more on the Microsoft HoloLens website!


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Medicine Meets Virtual Reality (MMVR22) Launches in Los Angeles

mmvr 22

Today at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles the 22nd annual Medicine Meets Virtual Reality meeting launched to an international audience. HealthySim is on hand to provide updates throughout the day on our @HealthySim twitter account – and stay tuned tomorrow for a blog post covering more activities from the event. For now, learn more about MMVR below:

About MMVR

In 1992, Medicine Meets Virtual Reality first presented a daring vision of patient care and medical education transformed by computer technology. The evolving NextMed / MMVR engages researchers committed to intelligent healthcare—engineers, physicians, scientists, educators, students, industry, military, and futurists—with its creative mix of unorthodox thinking and validated investigation. Conference topics include:

    • Medical simulation and modeling
    • Data visualization and fusion
    • Virtual and augmented reality
    • Imaging devices and methods
    • Robotics, haptics, sensors
    • Human-computer interfaces
    • Data and decision networks, AI, mobile health
    • Wearable and implantable electronics
    • Projection systems
    • Learning and technology
    • Simulator design and validation
    • Physical and mental rehabilitation tools
    • Serious games
    • Surgical registration and navigation
    • Peri-operative guidance
    • Remote and battlefield care
    • Patient and public health monitoring and education

NextMed / MMVR promotes the creation and adoption of IT-enabled tools for patient care and medical education that support better precision, efficiency, and outcomes. The curriculum combines traditional assessment methods with unorthodox problem-solving to stimulate forward-thinking solutions to healthcare problems. Presentations are chosen to educate participants on:

    • Advances in simulation, modeling, and haptics that are upgrading medical education, skills  training, psychotherapy, and physical rehabilitation
    • Novel imaging, visualization, and data fusion methods that make clinical diagnosis and therapy more precise and personalized
    • Robotics and sensors that extend the caregiver’s reach and provide richer patient data
    • Medical intelligence networks that promote a collaborative healthcare environment and enhance decision-making
    • Broader goals, accomplishments, and challenges in the development and application of emerging healthcare technologies

Learn more at the Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Website!

NBC News: The Promise of Virtual Reality is Starting to Look Very Real

oculus rift healthcare simulation

On NBC News Online Michael Sheetz just released this article saying that “The Promise of Virtual Reality is Starting to Look Very Real”. VR will be a huge component of healthcare simulation in the next decade, so check out this article which provides a great recap of currently available technologies and applications!

NBC News Article Excerpt:

Only a handful of virtual reality headsets existed when Alphabet unveiled Google Glass, but the past half-decade has seen billions invested in VR, moving a technology once thought of as a gimmick much closer to the everyday lives of real people. Virtual reality companies raised $1.46 billion in venture capital from the start of 2012 through the third quarter this year, according to CB Insights, marking four straight quarters that these start-ups reached $100 million-plus in funding. Since 2010, these firms have raised $3.9 billion, according to PitchBook.

“There is always a richer and more immersive medium,” Zuckerberg said. “The next logical step is fully immersive VR,” Zuckerberg told developers. He described the early days as “just a 360 video,” adding, “In the future you’re going to feel like you’re right there.”

Facebook’s Oculus virtual reality platform recently unveiled lower-cost hardware and a slew of media partnerships that aim to bring the technology to the mainstream — its debut is slated for the first quarter of 2016. While hard-core gamers wait for the Oculus Rift to launch for use with PCs, many consumers were anxious to get their hands on the consumer version of the Samsung Gear VR, which went on sale for $99 in November, half the price of the headset last year. It sold out on eBay and Amazon in a matter of days.

Read the full VR Article on NBCNews.com!


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Case Western Reserve, Cleveland Clinic Collaborate with Microsoft for Mixed-Reality Technology for Education

microsoft medical simulation

Shared from Case Western Reserve University:

Case Western Reserve University Radiology Professor Mark Griswold recently shared how “HoloLens” can transform learning across countless subjects, including those as complex as the human body. Speaking to an in-person and online audience at Microsoft’s annual Build conference, he highlighted disciplines as disparate as art history and engineering—but started with a holographic heart. In traditional anatomy, after all, students like Ghodasara cut into cadavers to understand the body’s intricacies. With HoloLens, Griswold explained, “you see it truly in 3D. You can take parts in and out. You can turn it around. You can see the blood pumping—the entire system.”

In other words, technology not only can match existing educational methods—it can actually improve upon them. Which, in many ways, is why Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove contacted then-Microsoft executive Craig Mundie in 2013, after the hospital and university first agreed to partner on a new education building. “We launched this collaboration to prepare students for a health care future that is still being imagined,” Cleveland Clinic CEO Delos “Toby” Cosgrove said of what has become a 485,000-square-foot Health Education Campus project. “By combining a state-of-the-art structure, pioneering technology, and cutting-edge teaching techniques, we will provide them the innovative education required to lead in this new era.”

Because the technology is relatively easy to use, students will be able to build, operate and analyze all manner of devices and systems. “[It will] encourage experimentation,” Buchner said, “leading to deeper understanding and improved product design.”

In truth, HoloLens ultimately could have applications for dozens of Case Western Reserve’s academic programs. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory already has worked with Microsoft to develop software that will allow Earth-based scientists to work on Mars with a specially designed rover vehicle. A similar collaboration could enable students here to take part in archeological digs around the world. Or astronomy students could stand in the midst of colliding galaxies, securing a front-row view of the unfolding chaos. Art history professors could present masterpieces in their original settings—a centuries-old castle, or even the Sistine Chapel.

“The whole campus has the potential to use this,” Griswold said. “Our ability to use this for education is almost limitless.”

Read the full Hololens article here!

 

10 More Ways Virtual Reality is Revolutionizing Healthcare

medical-simulation-virtual-reality

Continuing our exploration of virtual reality today, here is a great article from TechRepublic entitled “10 ways Virtual Reality is Revolutionizing Medicine and Healthcare“. We should think of virtual reality not just in terms of what it can provide for healthcare professionals in terms of training, but also for rehabilitation and patient education.

“When people experience virtual reality for the first time, a common reaction is to start imagining all the different uses the technology might hold. Even within one industry, healthcare, the potential is open-ended. The good thing is that scientists and medical professionals have been at the drawing board for years now, developing and implementing virtual reality in ways that can help them train, diagnose, and treat in myriad situations.

Here are just ten of the use cases that are currently in practice and continually developing as the technology itself develops too:

  • Exposure therapy
  • Treatment for PTSD
  • Pain management
  • Surgical training
  • Phantom limb pain
  • Brain damage assessment and rehabilitation
  • Social cognition training for young adults with autism
  • Meditation Opportunities for the disabled
  • Opportunities for the homebound

I would add mass casualty scene management, patient assessment, ED scenarios and patient movement to the list. Here’s another list of VR’s affect in healthcare with some great videos on HuffintonPost.com:

  • Soothing Burn Victims’ Painful Therapy
  • Curing Phantom Pains In Amputee Victims
  • Therapy For Soldiers Suffering From PTSD
  • Treating Children With Autism
  • Allowing Surgical Students To Practice Techniques

 

Read the full TechRepublic article here and the HuffingtonPost Article here.

Let us know how you are using virtual reality for your healthcare programs!


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SimX Augmented VR Glasses Win IMSH Serious Games Showcase | Video Interview

augment reality

At the IMSH 2015 HealthySim had a chance to interview Ryan Ribeira, CEO of SimX, and practicing resident physician in emergency medicine at Stanford. Ryan was showcasing SimX at the 5th Annual Serious Games and Virtual Environments Showcase and Arcade which took place at IMSH 2015 in New Orleans, LA and provided over 300 attendees demonstrations of more than 21 entries. The event, started by Dr. Eric B. Bauman, continues to attract exceptional talent from around the world and did a fantastic job of highlighting some serious technology advances in our field such as SimX – which walked away as the WINNER of the Small Business or Corporation category.  (Click here to visit TheClinicalPlayground.com for a full showcase awards recap).

More about SimX:

Virtual Patients: SimX’s software replaces your physical simulation mannequins with a customizable, high-definition, 3D virtual patient, that can be projected onto any empty hospital bed. Whether obese, pregnant, young, old, vomiting, missing limbs, bleeding, or expressing any number of other physical signs and symptoms, SimX’s software allows you to reproduce patient presentations with unprecedented visual fidelity.

Case Builder: Build complex cases in minutes using the powerful visual case building system. Drag & drop events onto the field, determine the environment, and set patient data with just a few clicks. Use SimX’s powerful case monitoring and feedback system to see the case from each trainee’s perspective, and adjust case parameters on the fly.

Global Case Marketplace: SimX allows you to access thousands of cases from top hospitals across the globe! Let your trainees learn from specialists at the cutting edge of their field. Tap into the expertise of your own simulation specialists. Market your cases to the world and turn your expertise into revenue.

Direct Integration: SimX is built so that your trainees can learn using the tools you already have right at your institution. You can use your own beds, monitors, ultrasounds, stethoscopes, even your existing simulation manniquins! It’s easy to ensure that SimX software will recognize your tools, and allow your trainees to use them in the simlation.

Cloud Based Software: SimX’s marketplace, case authoring tools, and moderator interface are all located on the cloud, so you don’t have to worry about downloads or compatibility issues. Write and run cases from your desktop, laptop, or even your mobile device! If it has a browser, it works with SimX.

Reporting:  SimX’s case authoring and moderating tools come with powerful reporting features built right in. Every order, request, and event is recorded on the case timeline, so your team can debrief and see how cases might have gone if their decisions had been different. Create powerful reports that can help you pinpoint where trainees need the most help, and can track the improvement of teams or individuals over time.

Learn more at SimXAR.com!

Clemson University Utilizes VR Simulations to Train for Electrical & Manufacturing Industries

vr simulation manufacturing

South Carolina GSA Business recently covered the VR Simulation Training taking place at the Clemson University Center for Workforce Development. VR Oculus devices are providing electrical and manufacturing students the opportunity to safely practice new skills before entering more dangerous work scenarios. Sound familiar? My belief is that simulation will quickly become an integral part of all educational practices, from dealing with hot oil friers to office politics.

GSA Business Article Excerpt:

“No longer limited to video games, the simulations being developed at the Clemson University Center for Workforce Development are helping students across the country learn the skills that employers need in a modern manufacturing plant. One such simulation puts the user in a warehouse environment. The participant uses a keyboard or joystick to move around the virtual warehouse to identify safety violations. The virtual program gives feedback throughout the process.

The simulation gives a type of hands-on experience for the user without exposing them to the real hazards of a manufacturing setting.

Sabarish V. Babu, assistant professor in the School of Computing at Clemson, said: “Virtual simulations allow for interactive feedback. You receive instruction on how to actually use each instrument or program, then there’s an interactive, guided practice, with feedback as you’re performing the task.”

The virtual reality helps the student to safely practice their electrical testing skills while avoiding potential dangers that are present in the live labs, Isbell said. Once the students are comfortable with the virtual exercises they can then move to a live setting where an instructor can oversee the live work.

Dr. Anand Gramopadhye, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, said virtual reality is an innovative way to widen the pipeline that supplies the highly skilled workers the nation needs to be competitive.

“Manufacturing remains key to prosperity in our state and across the nation,” he said. “By teaching the skills needed in the next-generation workforce, our curriculum is helping shore up the middle class and putting families on the road to success.”

Read the full article on the GSA Business website!


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‘Born To Be Alive Birthing’ VR Simulator Educates Patients and Healthcare Learners

birth vr simulator

Showcasing some awesome VR technology, “Born to Be Alive” is a french birthing simulation system to provide new mothers, clinical students and healthcare professionals with a better way to learn about birthing scenarios.This 3D Experience was designed by iLumens, the Medical Teaching University Laboratory at the University of Paris-Descartes in partnership with Dassault Systèmes and its brands 3DVIA and Swym. The following groups also supported the development of this 3d project: Fondation de coopération scientifique, assistance publique hopitaux de paris, société française de médecine périnatale and collège national des gynécologues et obstétriciens français.

About Born To Be Alive

“Born To Be Alive is a realistic, interactive, educational serious game aimed at the largest possible audience which allows you to test your knowledge of different topics such as pregnancy, labor, postpartum care and much more by taking you through a variety of storyline scenarios.

3D modeling and simulation have, for several decades, enabled companies to create, optimize and manufacture their products with a physical representation that matches reality. Meanwhile, the global video game market has proved, within massive multi-player online environments, the advantages provided by scripts and artistic representations of imaginary virtual worlds. By bringing these two concepts together on a Cloud collaborative platform, developing new innovative 3D uses and publishing global 3D experiences on different terminals has never been easier.

That’s how Dassault Systems came to re-inject physically-exact 3D simulations, which used to be limited to professional users, into experiences made for a much larger audience, accessible from web browser or tablets. 3D Experiences, also known as Serious Games, open the world to new uses, such as communication and experiential marketing, documentation, training and education.

Learning by doing in a virtual world also provides a better retention of information. For instance, in the medical sector, living a 3D Experience as a virtual patient helps ones understand how to treat others more efficiently. The gamification of the situation also transforms the learning dynamics, promote team spirit and competition between users.

Digitalized medical equipment and 3D assets behave like their real-life versions. They provide relative-time learning experiences and leverage the abilities of an effective teacher. They do not replace the physical version but let an unlimited number of users play and replay actions, grow and perform in a hostile environment, act on a virtual patient, etc.”

Learn more at Born To Be Alive’s English Translated Website!

SimX Offers Augmented Reality Medical Simulations Through META 1 Wearable System

simx-meta1

*Jan. 2015 Update: Watch Our IMSH 2015 Serious Video Games Showcase Interview with SimX who won “best small business company”!*

‘The technology of medical simulation continues to rapidly evolve with a new announcement from Immersive wearable headset manufacturer Meta that their new “Meta 1” Augmented Reality goggles have recently started shipping. CNN says the Meta 1 “makes you a real life Tony Stark”. Below are some breakdowns about the hardware and software being developed specifically for medical simulations with a video demonstration recorded at TechCrunch: Disrupt. Augmented reality overlays 3d animations in real time over your physical envrionment. So in the photo above, SimX CMO Dr. Srihari Namperumal sees a virtual patient lying on the bed because of the QR code that is placed on the gurney surface. This provides learners with an opportunity to see virtual patients existing in real environments!

meta1

Key Features of the Meta 1 Device

  • True Scale Holograms: See the physical and holographic worlds merge through our 3D stereoscopic display in real size, depth and parallax.
  • Markerless Surface Tracking: Look around the room and watch as holographs stay anchored to physical tables, floors and walls – thanks to our low-latency, 360º tracking.
  • Natural User Interface: Grab, pinch and touch 3D objects in the real world, and drive a touch-based holographic user interface.

About SimX Augmented Reality Medical Simulation Software

“SimX’s software replaces your physical simulation mannequins with a customizable, high-definition, 3D virtual patient, that can be projected onto any empty hospital bed.  Whether obese, pregnant, young, old, vomiting, missing limbs, bleeding, or expressing any number of other physical signs and symptoms, SimX’s software allows you to reproduce patient presentations with unprecedented visual fidelity.

Build complex cases in minutes using the powerful visual case building system.  Drag & drop events onto the field, determine the environment, and set patient data with just a few clicks.  Use SimX’s powerful case monitoring and feedback system to see the case from each trainee’s perspective, and adjust case paramaters on the fly. “

Watch the demos above and learn more at the SimX and META websites!

A History of Virtual Reality

history of virtual reality

An interesting article caught my attention today covering a history of Virtual Reality. While we love the modern advancements of simulation technology in healthcare – we should reflect on the long history of virtual reality that has lead us to this recent adoption of technologies heavily utilized by other industries like aviation. Check out this snippet from a new article from RedOrbit entitled The History of Virtual Reality:

“Today, VR technology is big business in many areas of the tech, medical and military community. However, the technology is not a new one, as the term can trace its roots back more than a century. In fact, the first mention of virtual reality can be traced back to the 1860s, when 360-degree art via panoramic murals began to appear. While this may be a very archaic description of the term virtual reality, the future of the technology only gets better.

Simulators, which today are almost everywhere, were introduced in the 1920s. Early vehicle simulators may have helped bring about more futuristic systems that now include flight simulators, golfing simulators, spacecraft simulators, as well as simulation-based video gaming. In fact, Thomas A. Furness III would develop the first visual flight simulator for the US Air Force in 1966.”

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