Complete Administrator’s Guide To Healthcare Simulation ‘HealthySimAdmin’ Program Series Now Available for Free!

healthysimadmin

Sim champs HealthySimulation.com is welcoming 2017 with a bang by recapping for you here ALL eight HealthySimAdmin videos! Each of these 2 hour recorded sessions provides key administrative insights by an entire panel of leading healthcare simulation program directors! Sponsored by Laerdal, B-Line Medical, and Pocket Nurse, the original value of watching the program online was $450, but now the entire program is available to watch for free online!

HealthySimAdmin was the world’s first broadcasted event providing an open and online discussion to share administrative solutions for the “how to” of medical simulation. Hundreds of simulation program administrators from around the world have watched the HealthySimAdmin panel of sim lab management experts from hospital, military, community college and university nursing programs, medical schools, EMS providers as well as medical simulation consultant groups to cover eight community-selected topics which included: Collaborative simulation program development, Funding sources & models, Faculty/educator buy-in, Research coordination, Daily operations, IT issues & support, Increasing utilization & Business development!

medical simulation consulting

Watch this highlight to preview some of the thousands of administrative tips to be gained from HealthySimAdmin:



Learn what other sim lab administrators are saying about HealthySimAdmin:

Each of the following sessions starts with a 40 minute presentation by the associated key speaker which is then followed by 60 minutes of discussion and Q&A session by the entire expert panel:

Part 1: “Collaborative Simulation Program Development” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN

Part 2: “Funding Sources & Models” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN & COL (Ret) John McManus, MD, MCR

Part 3: “Clinical Educator Training & Buy-in” – Jane Kleinman RN, MAOM

Part 4: “Sim Research Development” – Amar Pravin Patel, MS, NREMT-P, CFC

Part 5: “Maximizing Daily Operations” – Henry Henao MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC, EMT

Part 6: “IT Structures & Issues” – James Cypert BAP, BAIT, MCSE, MCT, MCP

Part 7: “Increasing Sim Program Utilization” – Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D.

Part 8: “Business Development & Revenue Generation” – Lance Baily, HealthySimAdmin Organizer

Complete Session Details are available on those pages. Reasons to Watch HealthySimAdmin, NOW TOTALLY FREE:

  • Expand your knowledge by learning from a diverse group of sim admins
    The HealthySimAdmin panel of experts is comprised of successful simulation program administrators from a variety of settings including: community, state and university nursing schools, medical schools, EMS programs, hospitals, IT departments, and the military. Additional panel members will include leading industry consultants who have designed and managed sim labs around the globe. HealthySimAdmin will not only share “proven-to-work” techniques from others in your field but also provide an expanded perspective from others that utilize medical simulation within healthcare.
  • Learn from your new professional community
    Currently there are no professional degrees in medical simulation program management. Simulation program administrators have varied experience which may include successful or maybe, not so successful, strategies for managing a simulation center/lab. For example, a sim lab program manager with an IT background will have little trouble integrating their center’s network technology, but may find clinical educator training and buy-in much more challenging. In that sense, our growing international community is the best resource we have for learning and sharing the best practices in each of the numerous facets necessary to operate a simulation lab. HealthySimAdmin’s mission is to create a global and shared community online space where healthcare simulation program administrators can find and share information unique to medical simulation management.
  • Participate from anywhere in the world
    What happened in Vegas did not stay in Vegas with HealthySimAdmin! With any high-speed internet connection you will be able to watch HealthySimAdmin wherever you are. Join an international audience of healthcare simulation managers who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and gain global insight into the operations and development of a successful medical simulation program.
  • Maximize your time with medical simulation admin specific content
    While the methodology of simulation in healthcare continues to expand exponentially across the globe, the discussions regarding the operations and management of this technology are relatively new. And while other medical simulation-based meetings do exist, they primarily serve our community’s clinical educators. Thus, resources and guidance for program administrators remains limited. To address this challenge, HealthySimAdmin held an event specifically designed to meet the needs of healthcare simulation program administrators. Catch up to the hundreds of other administrators who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and maximize your time and resources by engaging with content that is as unique as your profession!

Sign Up for HealthySimulation.com’s Free Email Newsletter for more Great Content!


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Increasing Medical Simulation Program Utilization – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 7

healthcare simulation management

HealthySimAdmin was the world’s first broadcasted event providing an open and online discussion to share administrative solutions for the “how to” of medical simulation. During the live taping, more than 105 simulation program administrators from around the world participated in-person or online with the HealthySimAdmin panel of sim lab management experts from hospital, military, community college and university nursing programs, medical schools, EMS providers as well as medical simulation consultant groups to cover eight community-selected topics which included: Collaborative simulation program development, Funding sources & models, Faculty/educator buy-in, Research coordination, Daily operations, IT issues & support, Increasing utilization & Business development!

“Increasing Utilization”: How do you convince higher administration that your medical simulation program deserves additional funding, space, equipment and staff? How do you continue to increase services without frustrating staff or denying simulation champions? Allen Giannakopoulos, PhD shares with us how to expand simulation beyond the original scope of the program considering needs such as space, scheduling complications, financial support, technology issues, hiring new staff and more. Allen will then be joined by the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts to discuss how to increase usage in your simulation program, track and analyze statistical data to help gain additional support, modifying and transforming scheduling and procedural policies, overcoming resistance to program evolution as well as the differences in strategy necessary for short vs. long-term simulation program expansion. Audience question and answer period to follow lecture and panel discussion. With this session we will learn how to successfully grow a medical simulation lab program through various stages of development.

Session Presentation Lead By:

Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D.
Corporate Director, Baptist Health South Florida

Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D. is the Corporate Director for Reengineering and Redesign at Baptist Health South Florida in Miami, Florida. His duties include computer simulation of processes and scheduled events in clinical and business departments.  Dr. Giannakopoulos earned his academic credentials from the State University of New York in Brockport, BS in Business; University of Rochester, MBA in Business and Marketing; and his Ph.D. in Health Administration from Kennedy –Western in Sacramento.Dr. Giannakopoulos been published in over 50 health care journals and publications and has been a featured speaker and presenter over the past twenty years in health care, quality improvement, and simulation.Dr. Giannakopoulos has been working with computer modeling and simulations since the 1990’s, when basic tools were created.  Today, the most advanced computer simulation tools are used to mimic clinical processes and provide clinicians with information on how to view the patient experience as a whole, in addition to analyzing specific parts. Dr. Giannakopoulos worked with SSiH to survey members on their experiences in order to ascertain what the best practices are in creating, building, and sustaining a simulation center. This body of knowledge continues to be built for the benefit of organizations that are looking to construct their simulation center.

Subscribe to HealthySim’s Free Monthly Newsletter to See All the HealthySimAdmin Sessions Now!

Interesting Medical Simulation Studies & Research Twitter Feed

healthcare simulation research 2014

Some interesting simulation studies have recently been published. Thanks to Tim Willet (@SIMtim_one) for highlighting these and many more research articles for medical simulation! Follow Tim for continuous links to the latest medical simulation research!

Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey. (Qayumi K, Pachev G, Zheng B, Ziv A, Koval V, Badiei S, Cheng A.) – Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

We recommend that educational and health care authorities, as well as accreditation and licensing bodies, support the integration of simulation into health care education for all learner groups. This can be achieved by:

  • Recognizing simulation-based education as a central modality in the maintenance of competencies in health care
  • Setting standards on the expected proficiencies of health care professionals, and identifying how simulation can assist in achieving and maintaining those standards
  • Designing and delivering simulation curriculum for patient safety, professionalism and advocacy-related competencies
  • Encouraging collaboration between and within institutions to promote sharing of existing and new curriculum and expertise.

To promote the growth of simulation-based research on a global scale, we recommend the development of improved opportunities for collaboration and networking. These opportunities will enhance expertise, expand potential for multicenter simulation studies, and further the quality of future simulation-based research. Here, Visit our HealthySimAdmin pages to gain free access to eight administrative sessions.

Central venous access by trainees: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the use of simulation to improve success rate on patients. (Madenci AL, Solis CV, de Moya MA.) – Simulation training for invasive procedures may improve patient safety by enabling efficient training. This study is a meta-analysis with rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria designed to assess the real patient procedural success of simulation training for central venous access. We identified 550 studies, of which 5 (3 randomized controlled trials, 2 prospective 2-group cohort studies) studies of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion were included in the meta-analysis, composed of 407 medical trainees. The simulation group had a significantly larger proportion of trainees who successfully placed CVCs (RR, 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.16, P<0.01). In addition, the simulation group had significantly fewer mean attempts to CVC insertion (weighted mean difference, -1.42; 95% CI, -2.34 to -0.49, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the rate of adverse events between the groups (RR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.19-1.29; P=0.15). CONCLUSIONS: Training programs should consider adopting simulation training for CVC insertion to improve the real patient procedural success of trainees.

Emergency medicine resident crisis resource management ability: a simulation-based longitudinal study. (Clarke S, Horeczko T, Carlisle M, Barton JD, Ng V, Al-Somali S, Bair AE.) – Simulation has been identified as a means of assessing resident physicians’ mastery of technical skills, but there is a lack of evidence for its utility in longitudinal assessments of residents’ non-technical clinical abilities. We evaluated the growth of crisis resource management (CRM) skills in the simulation setting using a validated tool, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (Ottawa GRS). We hypothesized that the Ottawa GRS would reflect progressive growth of CRM ability throughout residency. Ottawa GRS scores increased over time, and the domains of leadership, problem solving, and resource utilization, in particular, were predictive of overall performance. There was a significant gain in all Ottawa GRS components between postgraduate years 1 and 2, but no significant difference in GRS performance between years 2 and 3. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, CRM skills are progressive abilities, and simulation is a useful modality for tracking their development. Modification of this tool may be needed to assess advanced learners’ gains in performance.

From Time-Based to Competency-Based Standards: Core Transitional Competencies in Plastic Surgery. (Lutz K, Yazdani A, Ross D.) – Competency-based medical education is becoming increasingly prevalent and is likely to be mandated by the Royal College in the near future. The objective of this study was to define the core technical competencies that should be possessed by plastic surgery residents as they transition into their senior (presently postgraduate year 3) years of training. Overall, 26 competencies have been identified as “core” for plastic surgery residents to possess as they begin their senior, on-service years. The nature of these skills makes them suitable for teaching in a formal, simulated environment, which would ensure that all plastic surgery trainees are competent in these tasks as they transition to their senior years of residency.


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The Use of Gamification to Boost Residents’ Engagement in Simulation Training

gamification surgical simulation boosts results

Want to increase the utilization of key simulators to improve ROI? Then you need to read this JAMA Surgery article which helped one program reduce cost per hours by over 11 times! ‘The Use of Gamification to Boost Residents’ Engagement in Simulation Training’ by B. Price Kerfoot, MD of Boston Healthcare System and Harvard Medical School and Nicole Kissane, MD, of Boston Medical Center and Boston University.

Abstract: Interval deliberate practice of surgical skills is required for surgical residents to develop and maintain their technical skills. Even 2 weeks without practice on a minimally invasive surgical simulator can lead to a substantial decline in skills.1 In spite of the value of interval simulation training, incentivizing residents to engage regularly in simulation training can be a challenge for many institutions. Can gamification (the introduction of game mechanics to engage users, including but not limited to competition and leaderboards)2 boost residents’ engagement in simulation training? Although game-based learning is cited as an emerging technology likely to have a large impact on education in the next 2 to 3 years,3 little research has been conducted to demonstrate its efficacy for health professional training.4 We investigated whether the introduction of competitive game mechanics into simulator education among residents could significantly boost the use and cost-effectiveness of the da Vinci Skills Simulator (Intuitive Surgical Inc).

Methods: During weeks 1 through 7, residents were invited to use the simulator. A single elimination tournament was then announced via e-mail at the end of week 7. The 16 residents with the highest aggregate scores on 9 exercises on the simulator during weeks 8 through 14 would qualify. Leaderboards were posted via e-mail every 1 to 2 weeks. Tournament prizes ranged from $50 to an iPad (Apple Inc) for the winner. Over all 14 weeks, a $30 travel reimbursement was given to residents not on a VA rotation for each trip to use the simulator. The tournament compared ring-walk simulator and dry-laboratory performance among qualifying residents. Cost estimates include the price of the simulator ($85 000 amortized over 5 years), travel reimbursements, and prizes but not the salary expenses of a simulation coordinator.

Results: Residents, sessions, exercises, and use duration increased by 7-fold, 17-fold, 58-fold, and 32-fold, respectively. After the announcement of the tournament, the estimated cost per hour of simulator use decreased 12-fold from $864 to $74.

Gamifying this training only took the organization of a tournament with the investment of prizes, so it can’t be too hard to replicate these results for your simulation program in key areas!

Read the full article on the JAMA website.

NAEMSE Plenary: Laerdal Supported Research Study of Simulation Education in EMS

ems simulation research

*Update*: Full article now available here.

This weekend HealthySim attended NAEMSE in Reno, NV and sat in on Saturday’s Plenary Session entitled “Simulation in Paramedic Education: Survey Says!” which was presented by Kim McKenna, M.Ed. RN EMT-P, Director of Education St. Charles County Ambulance District, St. Peters, MO. Other authors of the soon-to-be published work included: Elliot Cahart, Daniel Bercher, Andrew Spain, John Todaro and Joann Freel.

This research project was supported by Laerdal Medical in an attempt to explore simulation utilization in EMS programs similar to the national research landmark study of simulation in nursing education recently published by the NCSBN.

Plenary Session Description: Simulation is an increasingly important strategy in EMS education. EMS program faculty and administrators face growing challenges to promote student learning and to demonstrate student competence. This, coupled with budgetary challenges and clinical and field resource limitations, has led EMS educators to ask how simulation can be used to enhance, or replace traditional learning experiences. Yet little is known about simulation in EMS. Attend this session to hear what the research says. The NAEMSE Research Committee conducted a study to characterize the use of simulation in initial paramedic education programs. This session will present the findings detailing the simulation resources that paramedic programs have and provide a comparison between how they are used. It will also provide a look into faculty perceptions regarding simulation, and importantly, it will shed light on program characteristics that influence the use of simulation.

We already know that healthcare simulation:

  • Simulation can improve knowledge and skills (Dickison, 2010),
  • It may reduce error rates in trauma performance (Wyatt 2004),
  • Some allied health research shows equivalent results when simulation was substituted for some clinical (Hayden 2014).

In EMS we also know:

  • Less than 8% of paramedic students met at DOT specific assessment and skills requirements for clinical field.
  • Less than 50% met required assessments for psychiatric, pediatric respiratory distress, and & OB patients or on ventilating non-intubated patients. (Saizman, 2009)
  • Access to OR for live intubation is also limited (westergard 2013)

Survey was designed to characterize the use of simulation in EMS education:

  • What simulation resources do paramedic programs have?
  • What simulation resources do programs USE?
  • What differences exist between the resources used and using now?
  • What were the faculty opinions regarding simulation?

While I cannot share the results of the survey here yet as the research is about to be published, I was given permission by Kim to share the content of their poster entitled “Sharing Simulation Resources is Associated with Less Frequent Use of Simulation in Accredited Paramedic Programs”, which covered a section of the research:

Poster Results:

The survey was sent to 638 paramedic programs. We received 389 responses (61%). Nearly all th programs reported that they have task trainers (100%), simple manikins (08%), and intermediate manikins (95%). Fewer programs reported having advanced manikins (76%), standardized patients (58%), computer-based simulation (45%), and virtual reality (8%). A series of Pearson Chi-Square analyses showed that program that reported “having access to” a given simulation resource use that resource less frequently that programs that reported ‘having” that same resource.

Conclusions:

Initial paramedic programs that share or borrow simulation resources use them less frequently than those that have dedicated resources. These findings have significant practical implications and highlight a major limitation of sharing simulation resources.

Kim shared EMS will need evidence to guide when it is appropriate to substitute simulation for clinical/field, a body of knowledge on best practices for EMS and will also need to find ways to network and mentor each other. I shared with Kim that the barrier of “simulation technology training” could be overcome through the non-profit organization SimGHOSTS.

Stay tuned for the full survey results to be published soon and visit NAEMSE for more great event recaps!

*UPDATE*: Full Article now released here!

Watch $150 HealthySimAdmin Session “Increasing Simulation Program Utilization” For Free This Week Only!

healthy sim admin

This week we are sharing another session from HealthySimAdmin.com, which was a 2 day HD-recorded event produced at the University of Nevada Las Vegas School of Nursing addressing the how-to of medical simulation program administration. In this session, Corporate IT Director at Baptist Health South Florida and Treasurer for the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, Allen Giannakopoulos, PhD covers the state of management principles in administration of a medical simulation program and gives crucial tips on how to improve your operations. His talk is then followed by a panel discussion by a dynamic range of medical simulation program administrators from nursing schools, medical schools, EMS programs, military divisions, hospitals and consultants. This 2-hour session is being provided for free for the next seven days only — so take advantage of it now before it goes behind closed doors again!

LINK REMOVED – VIDEO NO LONGER AVAILABLE

HealthySimAdmin was the world’s first broadcasted event providing an open and online discussion to share administrative solutions for the “how to” of medical simulation. During the live taping, more than 105 simulation program administrators from around the world participated in-person or online with the HealthySimAdmin panel of sim lab management experts from hospital, military, community college and university nursing programs, medical schools, EMS providers as well as medical simulation consultant groups to cover eight community-selected topics which included: Collaborative simulation program development, Funding sources & models, Faculty/educator buy-in, Research coordination, Daily operations, IT issues & support, Increasing utilization & Business development!

“Increasing Utilization”: How do you convince higher administration that your medical simulation program deserves additional funding, space, equipment and staff? How do you continue to increase services without frustrating staff or denying simulation champions? Allen Giannakopoulos, PhD shares with us how to expand simulation beyond the original scope of the program considering needs such as space, scheduling complications, financial support, technology issues, hiring new staff and more. Allen will then be joined by the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts to discuss how to increase usage in your simulation program, track and analyze statistical data to help gain additional support, modifying and transforming scheduling and procedural policies, overcoming resistance to program evolution as well as the differences in strategy necessary for short vs. long-term simulation program expansion. Audience question and answer period to follow lecture and panel discussion. With this session we will learn how to successfully grow a medical simulation lab program through various stages of development.

Session Presentation Lead By:

Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D.
Corporate Director IT Process Reengineering & Operational Process Support;
Knowledge Reports Development and Client Advocacy
Baptist Health South Florida
& SSH Treasurer

Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D. is the Corporate Director for Reengineering and Redesign at Baptist Health South Florida in Miami, Florida. His duties include computer simulation of processes and scheduled events in clinical and business departments.  Dr. Giannakopoulos earned his academic credentials from the State University of New York in Brockport, BS in Business; University of Rochester, MBA in Business and Marketing; and his Ph.D. in Health Administration from Kennedy –Western in Sacramento.Dr. Giannakopoulos been published in over 50 health care journals and publications and has been a featured speaker and presenter over the past twenty years in health care, quality improvement, and simulation.Dr. Giannakopoulos has been working with computer modeling and simulations since the 1990’s, when basic tools were created.  Today, the most advanced computer simulation tools are used to mimic clinical processes and provide clinicians with information on how to view the patient experience as a whole, in addition to analyzing specific parts. Dr. Giannakopoulos worked with SSiH to survey members on their experiences in order to ascertain what the best practices are in creating, building, and sustaining a simulation center. This body of knowledge continues to be built for the benefit of organizations that are looking to construct their simulation center.

HealthySimAdmin Was Sponsored By:

UNLV School of Nursing

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pocket nurse

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Survey for Nursing Support Needs to Utilize Simulation

Today we are helping Margaret Clifton with her research on Nurse Eduacator needs.  Please see her request to fill out a short 10-minute survey below:

Dear Colleagues,

Please let me introduce myself: my name is Margaret Clifton, and as part of requirements towards earning a Doctoral Degree in education from Argosy University I am conducting research that examines perceptions of nurse educators’ views of their support needs relative to the use of high-fidelity patient simulation.  The research also explores how perceived needs are prioritized.

If you are a nurse educator teaching baccalaureate undergraduate nursing students in the United States, have access to the use of high-fidelity patient simulation, and you’re willing to complete a short one-time survey, please click on the hyper-linked ‘yes’ option enclosed in this e-mail. The linked consent form is a formality that must be included. Thank you so very much for consenting to participate.  After reading the consent form, you can take the Nurse Educators Perceptions of Barriers Scale Survey here.