Featured Job Listing: Medical Simulation Operators For Traveling Per Diem Position Across U.S.

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Engenium is currently seeking applicants for healthcare simulation technology operators who are willing to travel across the United States for about two weeks at a time.

Medical Simulation Operators are needed to join the growing Engenium team, assisting Nurse training events across the country. These are “per diem” roles typically lasting 2 weeks per training event. Simulation Operators have the responsibility for the operation of simulation equipment and help with coordinating and integrating organizational training initiatives.

Key Responsibilities:



  • Operates computer controlled mannikin simulation equipment with the ability to follow medical aspects of training scenarios and make appropriate adjustments based on participant actions
  • Operates an audio-video recording system
  • Sets up simulation equipment to meet assigned training site objectives
  • Facilitates simulation training and provides collaborative feedback to Course Directors and/or Medical Facility staff
  • Responsible for input and tracking of information associated with training data
  • Works with a broad array of stakeholders to contribute to the development of educationally sound simulation curriculum (e.g., scenarios) as needed.
  • Assists with any other duties that may be needed as determined by the local Simulation Coordinator or the Medical Modeling and Simulation Program

Basic Qualifications

  • At least 2 years’ continuous employment experience in a similar role
  • Associates Degree in related discipline
  • Experience in operation of audio-video recording system
  • Basic understanding of computer programming
  • Basic understanding of medical scenario development

Candidates who undergo training must commit to a flexible work schedule that involves extensive travel across the US.

To learn more please email Jason Irving, President of Engenium


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Wednesday Deadline: SimGHOSTS Early-Bird Deadline for Global Sim Technology Training Events

sim tech training

Sim Champs a final reminder that this Wednesday is the FINAL day for early-bird registrations to SimGHOSTS simulation training events in Australia, United Kingdom, and USA this July through August. If you have been planning to attend these world class hands-on training events, now is the time to secure big savings by registering by this Wednesday!

Melbourne: July 5-8th
London: July 18-20th
Peoria, IL (near Chicago): August 2nd-5th

Key Justifications to Attend SimGHOSTS:

  • Affordable: ­Compared to other international simulation events SimGHOSTS is as much as HALF the cost. Take advantage of early-­bird registration for even greater savings.
  • Focused: ­ SimGHOSTS is the only event specifically addressing the community, skill sets, and development of those operating healthcare simulation technology.
  • Engaging: ­ Other events provide limited technical content which has not been reviewed by technical experts. With SimGHOSTS you will get the training to take you further.
  • Intimate: Unlike endless exhibit halls, at SimGHOSTS you can build quality relationships with vendors and have the time necessary to deep dive into product details.
  • Innovative: ­ SimGHOSTS represents the cutting ­edge of simulation technology, and thus, the healthcare simulation industry’s future trends. Stay ahead of the curve!
  • Valuable Networking: ­Everyone at SimGHOSTS does the same work you do! Easily connect with your peers through courses, receptions, showcases, and competitions!
  • Hands-­on:­ Minimal lectures, maximum direct training. Don’t just listen, do!

Register today at the SimGHOSTS 2016 Events webpage!

Media Covers May BMJ Article: “Medical Error 3rd Leading Cause of Death in U.S.” – Call for New Hashtag #SimToZero!

medical errors and simulation

Earlier this month the BMJ published a study by medical researchers from John Hopkins which provided a deeper analysis into the 2014 Journal of Patient Safety. Check out more about the new article here, and listen to this BMJ Podcast interview about the research:

About the Analysis:

Analyzing medical death rate data over an eight-year period, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts have calculated that more than 250,000 deaths per year are due to medical error in the U.S. Their figure, published May 3 in The BMJ, surpasses the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s third leading cause of death—respiratory disease, which kills close to 150,000 people per year. The Johns Hopkins team says the CDC’s way of collecting national health statistics fails to classify medical errors separately on the death certificate.

The researchers are advocating for updated criteria for classifying deaths on death certificates. “Incidence rates for deaths directly attributable to medical care gone awry haven’t been recognized in any standardized method for collecting national statistics,” says Martin Makary, professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and an authority on health reform. “The medical coding system was designed to maximize billing for physician services, not to collect national health statistics, as it is currently being used.”

This publication really caught a lot of media attention:

  • CBS News – “For the study, Makary and his colleagues evaluated four separate studies that analyzed medical death rate data from 2000 to 2008, including one by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Based on 2013 data on hospitalization rates, they found that of 35,416,020 hospitalizations, 251,454 deaths stemmed from a medical error. They said that adds up to 9.5 percent of all deaths a year in the U.S.”
  • Huffington Post“Unfortunately, this news is not surprising at all. In the medical community, we have seen the consequences of inaccurate diagnoses and medical error for quite some time. While concrete efforts have been made to correct wrong site surgeries and other well publicized issues from the past, not enough has been done to address medical error that results from an incomplete or inaccurate diagnosis. 37% of the cases we review require a change in diagnosis, and over 75% of cases require a change in treatment plan.”
  • CNN – “One reason there’s such a wide range of numbers is because accurate data on these kinds of deaths is surprisingly sparse. That’s in part because death certificates don’t ask for enough data, Makary said. Currently the cause of death listed on the certificate has to line up with an insurance billing code. Those codes do not adequately capture human error or system factors.”
  • Washington Post ““There has just been a higher degree of tolerance for variability in practice than you would see in other industries,” he explained. When passengers get on a plane, there’s a standard way attendants move around, talk to them and prepare them for flight, Sands said, yet such standardization isn’t seen at hospitals. That makes it tricky to figure out where errors are occurring and how to fix them. The government should work with institutions to try to find ways improve on this situation, he said.”

Additional press Coverage spread wide and far…

Unfortunately, many of the articles did NOT cover potential solutions for addressing these avoidable mistakes. As champions of Simulation, we must reach out to these media agencies and remind them that healthcare simulation provides a huge opportunity to better educate and train for improved patient safety outcomes.

With this rare opportunity to maximize such exposure, I encourage you to write in and tweet these media agencies and remind them that simulation is already helping to address many of these problems with the hashtag #SimToZero, highlighting a goal to reduce medical errors to zero through the use of healthcare simulation.

Please join me in this new campaign to create a hashtag supporting
Simulation To Zero Patient Deaths From Medical Error!


Supported Organization:


CAE Healthcare Connects U.S. Navy to High-Fid Combat Simulator CAEsar

This exciting press release about the large distribution of Combat Simulator’s CAEsar was forwarded to me by CAE Healthcare. Learn more about the CAEsar from my video review, re-embedded below.

ceasar combat simulator

CAE Healthcare sells record 44 Caesar Trauma Patient Simulators to United States Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC)

Montreal, Canada, December 11, 2013 –– CAE Healthcare announced today the record sale of 44 Caesar trauma patient simulators to the United States Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) for tactical medical care field training in sites throughout the U.S., Guam and Spain. In addition to the simulators, CAE Healthcare will provide NECC training and multi-year maintenance services.  The total contract is valued at more than $3 million.

“We believe the use of Caesar trauma patient simulators to train non-traditional medical units within the Navy Expeditionary Combat Command demonstrates a heightened awareness of the value of high-fidelity medical simulation, and how it provides a more efficient and standardized means of training for high-stakes environments,” said Michael Bernstein, president of CAE Healthcare. “CAE continues to extend its reach into the defence and security markets with simulation solutions that include not only mission training but also medical training. The U.S. NECC joins many military and disaster response organizations that have chosen CAE Healthcare’s Caesar for best-in-class training, including the NATO Centre of Excellence for Military Medicine in Budapest, Hungary and the U.S. Center for Domestic Preparedness in Anniston, Alabama.”

The Caesar trauma patient simulators will allow NECC to provide standardized core skills training across expeditionary forces. Navy Expeditionary Combat Command serves as the single functional command for the Navy’s expeditionary forces and as central management for the readiness, resources, manning, training and equipping of those forces. Expeditionary forces are organized to accomplish specific objectives in other countries including anti-terrorism, force protection, theater security cooperation and engagement, and humanitarian assistance/disaster relief contingencies.

Developed for combat casualty care training in harsh environments, CAE Healthcare’s Caesar trauma patient simulator is rugged and resistant to extreme temperatures, rain, dirt, dust, sand and body impact. With profuse bleeding, Caesar is ideal for training non-medical responders to assess and stabilize an injured patient for transport, control hemorrhaging and practice airway management to restore breathing. The simulator also captures information about each trainee’s performance for review and assessment.

About CAE Healthcare

CAE Healthcare offers cutting-edge learning tools to healthcare students and professionals, allowing them to develop practical experience through risk-free simulation training before treating real patients. CAE Healthcare’s full spectrum of simulation solutions includes surgical and imaging simulation, curriculum, the LearningSpace audiovisual and center management platform and highly realistic adult, pediatric and baby patient simulators. Today, approximately 8,000 CAE Healthcare simulators are in use worldwide by medical schools, nursing schools, hospitals, defense forces and other entities.

Learn more about the CAEsar from my video review.

Why Are Healthcare Costs So High in the United States?

Just for a change today I am posting an interesting video I recently watched which questions “Why Are Healthcare Costs So High in the United States?“.

Eventually I think simulation will help to diminish some of these costs (risk aversion from increased technical, cognitive and and behaviorial training). But for now, a thought-provoking video worth considering:

From the Video’s Explanation:

John discusses the complicated reasons why the United States spends so much more on health care than any other country in the world, and along the way reveals some surprising information, including that Americans spend more of their tax dollars on public health care than people in Canada, the UK, or Australia. Who’s at fault? Insurance companies? Drug companies? Malpractice lawyers? Hospitals? Or is it more complicated than a simple blame game? (Hint: It’s that one.)

For a much more thorough examination of health care expenses in America, I recommend this series at The Incidental Economist:http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wor…
The Commonwealth Fund’s Study of Health Care Prices in the US:http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/med…
Some of the stats in this video also come from this New York Times story: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/02/hea…