One Week Left! Early-Bird Registrations to SimGHOSTS Simulation Technology Training Events in AUS, UK, USA End Soon!

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Did you know you now only have one week left to secure early-bird registrations to SimGHOSTS 2016 Summer events in Australia, United Kingdom, and United States? The time to secure huge savings on the world’s leading simulation technology training events is now!

“Everyone involved in operating simulation needs to be at SimGHOSTS.” ­
Amy Wise, Health Sciences Sim Coordinator, North Central Texas College

Why an Event Specific to Those Operating Healthcare Simulation Technology?

Medical Simulation is an emerging professional field which currently has little to no formalized educational pathways for entrance. Thus, everyone who starts or continues a career into medical simulation has side­stepped from another field or industry. This means that members of this community bring with them a wealth of specialized knowledge that others will not have. The SimGHOSTS meeting is the primary way for this new professional community to come together and share these best practices gained from years of experience in other fields, will enable all Sim Techs to walk away with a greater ability to perform the many responsibilities of their professional duties.

SimGHOSTS Advantages Over Other Simulation Events

Hands-­on & Specific Content: Between wound creation in our moulage courses, to advanced networking workshops, to intense workgroup sessions… SimGHOSTS is all about the doing. Unlike other events that cater to clinical educators and focus on faculty integration, debriefing or other non­technical courses, Sim Techs come to SimGHOSTS to focus on issues relevant to their position. Attendees return home with valuable skills and knowledge of new techniques that can enhance realism in scenarios, increase reliability and flexibility of a simulation center’s systems, and more.


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Affordable registration: The SimGHOSTS board works hard to partner with the right host institutions, hotels and vendor sponsors to make sure the event is the best value for investments made into technical staff. Unlike other events that provide Technology courses as an afterthought, SimGHOSTS exists specifically for the purpose of providing resources to the technical user first and foremost. This is the only meeting solely built, operated and lead by Sim Techs. Other simulation technical events don’t come close to the day for day cost or value gained at SimGHOSTS which is jam­packed with diverse and innovative content. Plus, we work overtime with hotel partners to offer quality accommodations sometimes HALF the cost of other simulation events.

Personal connections: Simulation technical staff are often working alone and unable to “talk shop” to learn better ways to do their job. SimGHOSTS events give attendees the chance to be surrounded by their peer community and share best practices. Attendees return home with new ideas and new resources from national and international colleagues working in simulation centers at universities, hospitals, fire departments and more!

Australia
Australian Catholic University
Platinum Sponsored by Laerdal Medical
Download the Brochure
Melbourne, Victoria
Pre-Symposium: July 5th, 2016
Symposium: July 6th-8th, 2016

United Kingdom
Co-hosted by ASPiH
St. Georges Simulation & Clinical Skills Centre (GAPS)
Download the Brochure
London, England
Pre-Symposium: July 18th, 2016
Symposium: July 19th-20th, 2016

United States
Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center
Download the Brochure
Peoria, Illinois
Pre-Symposium: August 2nd, 2016
Symposium: August 3rd-5th, 2016

Middle East & Africa
Supported by Simulead
Mohammed Bin Rashid Academic Medical Center
Dubai, UAE
Pre-Symposium: November 13th, 2016
Symposium: November 14th-15th, 2016

Register Now Through the SimGHOSTS 2016 Events Page!


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MEdsim Magazine Becomes Medical Training Magazine

medical-training-magazine

A big announcement today from MEdSim Magazine, that they are changing their name and expanding their focus to “Medical Training: Improving Performance, Improving Outcomes”. In the 1st edition of the 2016 series, Publisher Andy Smith shares this editorial letter regarding the reasons behind the change, which I encourage you to read in its entirety as it reflects some of the major problems our community faces, and a few ideas on how we can move forward.

One of the reasons Medical Training Magazine is such an important resource is because their parent company, Halldale Media, is the leader in aviation and military training resources — and have a powerful mission to expand those industry’s success stories into healthcare. This does, however, mean that HealthySimulation.com has returned to be the sole independent news source specifically dedicated to medical simulation news and information. Sign up for our free medical simulation newsletter to stay informed with the latest healthcare simulation news.

You can start a subscription, and read the latest content at the
Medical Training Magazine on the Halldale Media Website.

From MEdSim to Medical Training Magazine:

From its inception MEdSim has always been about education and more specifically training than simulation per se.

To quote three healthcare leaders: – “its not the simulation, it’s the curriculum.” – ‘‘don’t talk to me about simulation talk to me about how you will help me improve my outcomes.” – “medicine has changed beyond measure in the last 50 years, yet the way we teach and train has hardly altered.”

By referring to simulation alone we put ourselves in a narrow, small box with a limited if evangelical following. For this reason we will be renaming the magazine from MEdSim to Medical Training from the next issue, using the byline Improving Performance, Improving Outcomes.

In an industry of perhaps 6 million people in the US alone, the leading Simulation societies have memberships of about 3000 and 1500 people. Those numbers are creditable but are they sufficient to impact an industry of this size and complexity?

It is doubtful that they can achieve the change patients demand, hospitals need and we, as the healthcare simulation and training industry, require if we are to achieve our twin and compatible aims of helping solve healthcare’s significant problems while building a decent business.

Whilst we at Halldale/MEdSim/MTM have been evangelizing on behalf of simulation in multiple industries for the past 30 years we recognize that it is indeed ‘not about the simulation.’ Though we all need to continue to evangelize because we know that the use of simulation in a well structured training curriculum dramatically improves personal, team and business performance! In the case of healthcare better training means better patient care.

The decision to make this name change to Medical Training was made over the summer and it was not made lightly, changing a brand is never easy and there will be some who prefer the old title, though we feel that many more will respond to the new one.

[Click the link below to continue reading…]

Read the rest of this entry »

Sim Tech Training Workshop ‘SimGHOSTS 2015 Dubai’ Early-Bird Registration Ends Soon!

simghosts middle east

Are you a simulation located in or near the middle east region looking for healthcare simulation technology specialist peer networking training with products from companies like Gaumard and Laerdal? Then join the SimGHOSTS team this November for their world famous “Sim Tech” meeting!

Dates:
November 23rd (pre-con workshops)
November 24th+25th (Main event)
Location:
Mohammed Bin Rashid Medical Center, Dubai Healthcare City
Fees:
Early-Bird (Until Oct. 9th): $275.00 USD per person
Regular (Until Nov. 22nd): $400.oo USD per person
Door Price: $500.00 USD per person
Brochure:
Download the brochure here.

Who Should Attend SimGHOSTS 2015 Middle East & Africa?

Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists (“Sim Techs”), or those permanently responsible for the technical operation and maintenance of a high-fidelity healthcare simulation lab. Although the event is open to everyone, SimGHOSTS is designed for technology specialists or those responsible for the physical day-today operations and maintenance of simulation equipment and labs.

The SimGHOSTS event is hands-on training for healthcare Simulation Technicians (or sim lab operators) needing to successfully operate a medical simulation lab. Other events are better suited for those responsible for clinically educating learners through simulation. Remember… Early-Bird Registration Ends October 9th!

What are the SimGHOSTS Sim Meeting Objectives?

  • Meet with other Simulation Technicians and share best practices
  • Network and build long term industry relationships with peers and vendors
  • Receive specialized training in:
    • High-fidelity manikin hardware & software operation, maintenance and repair
    • Audiovisual production techniques and debugging
    • Learning Management System troubleshooting
    • IT networking
    • Team leadership and communication techniques
    • Manikin moulage and makeup
    • Basic medical terminology, physiology, pharmacology and the latest in healthcare education practices.
    • Much more….
  • Discuss and develop professional community needs and standards.

SimGHOSTS is bringing our hands-on training event to Dubai, with partner Simulead! With the goal to connect Simulation Technology Specialists from around the world, the SimGHOSTS leadership is thrilled to partner with a key Middle Eastern distributor like Simulead to provide hands-on training, community support and more to those operating simulation technology in the region.

For the past five years, SimGHOSTS has continued to see increased attendance by the international community of Simulation Technology Specialists at its annual hands-on training events. With a mission to connect the world’s growing population of simulation technology professionals together, the non profit organization’s leadership has continued to engage in relationship building with organizations inside and outside the United States. Our inaugural international event hosted in 2014 by the University of the Sunshine Coast was a rousing success which brought together over a hundred simulation champions from around the world. The enthusiasm from the Australia event inspired SimGHOSTS to seek out partners in other regions, which led to the partnership with Simulead for a 2015 event in the Middle East.

October 9th is the early-bird registration deadline

So be sure to register today


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FierceHealthIT.com: Healthcare Increasingly Requires Tech Savvy Workforce

healthcare technology

Saw this interesting FierceHealthIT.com story floating around LinkedIn recently pointing out that the future of healthcare will require a much more tech-savvy workforce. Learn more about how this impacts simulation programs through UNLV School of Nursing Dean Caroyln Yucha’s course at SimGHOSTS 2015 Australia: Why The Sim Tech is Your #1 Sim Priority.

“The rise of technology in healthcare is creating new roles within the industry and requiring doctors and nurses to be tech-savvy as well, according to a story inFinancial Times.

Senior executives don’t necessarily have to be technology specialists, but technological strategies play key roles in their efforts to cut costs and increase efficiency. The hospital C-suite increasingly includes a chief analytics officer, a chief transformation officer or a chief information security officer. Leaders need to keep up with mobile apps, wearables, sensors, data analytics and wireless medical devices. Surgeons increasingly use computer consoles and robotic tools using cameras that display images on a high-resolution screen during surgery. Managing electronic records and analyzing the data generated by remote patient monitoring devices are calling for new sets of skills, according to the article.

Home-based care calls for people who can manage the networking technology to connect doctors and patients remotely.

As we move from data collection and implementation of [electronic medical records] systems to the point where we need analytics to improve patients outcomes, that whole increase in data analytics is going to produce a lot of new jobs in the market,” said Jim Utterback, who leads the health IT practice for executive search firm Witt/Kieffer.

Dick Daniels, Kaiser’s executive vice president and chief information officer, callstechnology essential to providing effective care. In addition to its deep use of analytics to improve case and cut costs, Kaiser is focusing technology on improving the customer experience as well, by digitizing membership cards, creating express check-ins for appointments and allowing patients to use videoconferencing to contact caregivers from mobile phones and hospital beds.”

Read the full FierceHealthIT.com story with Subscription here!

Use of Sensors and Simulation Technology to Quantify Clinical Palpation

nibib

Found this recently posted video on youtube entitled “Use of Sensors and Simulation Technology to Quantify Clinical Palpation” which was presented by Dr. Carla Pugh, M.D., Ph.D during the 2012 Scientific Sympoisum and Technology Showcase put on by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). This video demonstrates how new technologies can improve healthcare education and training in a variety of disciplines:

Learn more at the NIBIB website!


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“New Validation for Simulation Education” ANA Article from INACSL VP Lori Lioce

american nurse simulation

A recent article on the American Nurse by Lori Lioce Clinical Associate Professor & Simulation Coordinator at the University of Alabama Huntsville entitled “New Validation for Simulation Education” covers the continued evolution of healthcare simulation, the recent NCSBN landmark research study results, and the INACSL standards — all of which are helping to support the increase of medical simulation in healthcare education. Lori is also a Family Nurse Practitioner, Vice President of operations for INACSL and a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator. Below is some excerpts of this must-read article:

Technology and improved teaching and learning strategies are changing education as we knew it. A 2013 review conducted by David Cook of more than 1,000 individual studies with more than 50,000 participants revealed that “technology-enhanced simulation is consistently associated with large, statistically significant benefits in the areas of knowledge, skills and behaviors.” And “for direct patient effects, such as major complications, mortality, or length of stay, the benefits are smaller but still significant.” These findings, published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, underscore what many nursing educators and students have experienced firsthand.

Keys to successful simulation training experiences

loriHealth care simulation is used in a variety of settings for student and employee orientation, physiologic assessment, deliberate practice, on-demand clinical experiences, reflective exploration, competency validation, communication and teamwork development, remediation, and high-stakes testing. The beauty of simulation-enhanced learning is that it uniquely and deliberately allows participants to make mistakes at the bedside in a controlled environment with no risk to a patient. Health care simulation shouldn’t replace all clinical experiences. However, specific and purposeful integration of simulation can be an incredible process to witness. Further, the subsequent debriefing, whether at the bedside or in a formal debriefing room, allows participants and peers to safely discuss competent practice, rehearse peer-to-peer communication, identify and correct errors and explore the implications for patients, apply clinical practice protocols, and examine clinical reasoning with a knowledgeable facilitator. Personally, I enjoy seeing the “light go on” in the face of the participants when they really “get it.” The rapid discussion of how they made the connection from their reading or didactic education to clinical application is the key. They are excited, and it is contagious. That’s when I know we have had a positive experience.

Successful simulation requires planning and practice. A programmatic framework with specific steps is essential to support successful repeatable outcomes. The process may include a theoretical framework, orientation to the simulator, an explanation of the facilitator and participant roles and expectations, and preselection of specific achievable and measurable objectives. Participants should understand this process. The participant should lead and be empowered through pre- and post-briefing to achieve true change in practice through discovery learning.

Often administrators, staff, novice facilitators, course managers, clinicians and even participants may underestimate the preparation needed. In the educational environment, where you may have multiple groups repeating the same simulation, I am an advocate for a simulation expert and facilitator-led “dry run” of all simulations before implementation with participants. The dry run without participants allows the facilitator to see the experience from the participants’ perspective and ensures selection of a pre- and post-simulation process, especially when there are different facilitators within a course for each clinical group. This deliberate planning provides a vital opportunity for selection of learning preparation assignments, didactic coordination, review of and emphasis on objectives, coordination of vital equipment and medications, altering of the scenario, and agreement on a scenario stopping point. Most important, it verifies the presence of all physical and verbal cues that enable the participants to follow the clinical reasoning. Without these, simulation may not be aspirational or improve patient outcomes. Several vital components of a successful simulation learning program are dedicated simulation staff, effective coordination and scheduling, and an experienced debriefer — one who can guide the participants in discovery learning and not steal the “aha” moment. In fact, once a facilitator sees that light come on for the participants, he or she may never want to lecture again.

National and state regulation

Be aware that rules and regulations are being considered in various states regarding the use of simulation. In fact, in June 2013, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) completed data collection for a three-year multisite study on the use of simulation in prelicensure programs. The results are being released Aug. 13 at the NCSBN annual meeting in Chicago. I encourage you to periodically check with your state boards for specific updates.

Standards for best practice

With the rapid expansion in the field of health care simulation, standards for best practice have become increasingly important for quality, consistency, outcomes, and improvement of simulation programs and learning strategies.

In 2011, the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) published the seminal work Standards of Best Practice: Simulation. This document includes seven standards, and each standard includes specific criteria, outcomes and rationales. The standards provide a vital framework for decreasing clinical variability, planning strategically, initiating research and providing faculty development.

Four new standards, identified in 2013, are currently being prepared for publication in 2015 to address simulation design, research, standardized patients and interprofessional education.

Read Lori’s Full Article here on The ANA Website and order a copy of the Standards of Best Practice: Simulation at www.inacsl.org.

Healthcare Education Assessment Training & Technology Inaugural Conference Opens in Orlando

This morning at the Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel in Orlando, FL the inaugural Healthcare Education Assessment Training & Technology Conference opened its doors to healthcare educators, administrators, innovators, and more.

healthcare education assessment training and technology

Opening the show was Andy Smith of Halldale Media who shared how he began his journey into healthcare education by spending his childhood holidays with his parents who worked in hospitals. As an adult his passion took him into developing businesses which support simulation training in the military and aviation industries — all of which helped him see the stark differences healthcare training when he had to undergo laparoscopic surgery over a decade ago where there was no simulation. For him, the opportunity to help bridge that gap was clear. Andy then mentioned the book Beyond the Checklist by Suzanne Gordon (read my book review here) which obviously mentioned the “Miracle on the Hudson”, to which he suggested “was no miracle” because “prepared pilots executed trained procedures and communication methods that saved the lives of those onboard”. He then reminded us that while there have been about 400,000 deaths and millions of injuries attributed to medical error in the past year alone, there has not been a single death by a US-based airlines carrier in the past four years.

Being a world leader in simulation resources for aviation, Andy clearly brings critical knowledge necessary for the expanded success of simulation in healthcare. Challenges he suggested for our community include: resistance to change, a retiring baby-boomer generation which will create a vacuum of experience, the increased attention of medical errors by Washington DC and the difficulty to have good work in some areas to be adopted elsewhere.

Andy then introduced the event’s keynote speaker John H. Armstrong MD FACES, State Surgeon General and & Secretary of the Florida Department of Health. Dr. Armstrong provided a brief overview of the healthcare needs of Florida to help demonstrate the often-missed identification of exploring actual patient care needs before moving into simulation. He followed that “context” should be the primary driver of healthcare education and included other challenges to simulation champions in healthcare including:

  • Ability to show relevance to quality and ROI of performance outcomes
  • Fragmented business model which was understandably driven by industry but that we have usually invested in before analyzing real needs
  • Culture of “practice on patients” is outdated yet still prevalent and questioned if this was really the best way to evaluate process

Dr. Armstrong then suggested how we can move forward:

  • Re-brand simulation to inspire quality with focus on patient outcomes
  • Develop integrated business model which works between industry, patients, and healthcare providers and focuses on public priorities
  • Focus on curriculum development which follows this pattern: explore needs assessment, define outcomes, select metrics, design instructional content, select appropriate simulator and tools, and then explore evaluation & feedback. (as opposed to starting with simulator selection and then designing instruction content).

He finalized his talk by asking us “Why do we pay 6 billion a year for a premium in inefficiency in healthcare education and training?”, reminding us that we don’t seem to all be on the “same page” in the simulation community, and that we need to reposition education and training through simulation as part of the solution to health system challenges.

Currently David Banks MSW FACHE from Florida Hospital is reminding us that the U.S. Inspector General suggested that of the hundreds of thousands of death attributed to medical error, 44% of them are preventable. Inspired yet? HEATT is lining up to be the event healthcare needs to improve its education and training.

Learn more about the HEATT program here and for more coverage, be sure to follow twitter accounts @HealthySim & @HalldaleMedia.


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iMedicalApps.com Physicians Review Mobile Medical Technology Apps

imedicalapps

iMedicalApps provides honest reviews of all the latest medical apps for healthcare professionals, patients and analysts interested in mobile technology. Their physician editors lead a team of physicians, allied health professionals, medical trainees, and mHealth analysts in providing reviews, research, and commentary of mobile medical technology. Their publication is heavily based on our their experiences in the hospital and clinic setting.

Their work has been recognized as experts in mobile health by the New York Times, Wired Magazine, Slate Magazine, American Medical News, and many other reputable media outlets. They have also been in various medical journals, such as the Annals of Emergency Medicine, the Journal of Surgical Oncology, the Journal of Surgical Radiology, and others.

Unlike other medical review and mHealth sites, the iMedicalApps Editors do not make medical apps and institute strict conflict-of-interest policies, enabling us to provide an unbiased view of mobile medical technology.

Why Critical Reviews Are A Must for Medical Mobile Tech:
Shannon O’Hern, McNamara Emergency Medicine Resident (@shannonomac) writes a blog and is also one of the reviwers on iMedicalApps. She shares on her post “A Critical Eye on Mobile Technology in Medicine” why there is a need for such a website, that reviews are supposed to be honest and critical, and how such apps can help new and experienced medical professionals and patients learn more about healthcare:

“So why do I think it’s worthwhile to review apps? As medical education embraces new technology, I think it’s essential for us to look at new resources like mobile apps with the same critical eye that we use for evaluating traditional resources like medical textbooks and peer reviewed publications. At the same time, this is a fantastic opportunity to experiment with new ways to use technology in teaching, independent learning, and clinical practice.

Can a medical apps make us better doctors? CPR Game is a great example of using technology to explore new ways of learning. This serious game simulates a cardiac arrest scenario and teaches resuscitation skills by encouraging players to identify and preform critical actions in a timely manner to save their patient. I found that playing this game helped me remember my resuscitation ABCs and keep a level head when working on medical codes. I look forward to seeing more fun, interactive teaching tools like this in medical education.

On the other hand, I reviewed some apps that I wouldn’t recommend to other physicians. Coags Uncomplicated seemed like a great free educational app at first glance, but in the end turned out to have a hidden agenda – it was created by a drug company to sell more drugs. I called out Emergency Medicine iQ, a board review app, for having inaccurate references and incorrect explanations.  I also question the role of some apps in clinical practice – is it safe to use an app with an automated ECG algorithm? I don’t think so.” Read the full article here.Clearly there is a great need for this resource as “not all apps are created equal”. Be sure to read these professional reviews first!

Read the reviews and get the latest Medical Apps at iMedicalApps.com!

Silence Kills: Can Technology Drive Meaningful Cultural Change In Healthcare?

technology in healthcare communication

CEO of X Tech Ventures Robert Szczerba has posted another great article connecting the future of healthcare and technology. In this LinkedIn post he reminds us that an AACN report entitled ‘Silence Kills’ reported that out of 1700 healthcare professionals “84 percent of doctors observed colleagues who took dangerous shortcuts when caring for patients and 88 percent worked with people who showed poor clinical judgment. Despite the risks to patients, less than 10 percent of physicians, nurses, and other clinical staff directly confronted their colleagues about their concerns.” Robert continues to explore this gap in healthcare communication:

In the years following this study, there has been a strong movement by a number of companies to develop improved communication and patient safety tools. However, the 2010 follow-up study The Silent Treatment concluded, “that while safety tools are one part of the solution to improving patient care, they do not compensate for crucial conversation failures in the hospital. Silence still kills.

A common perception in the healthcare industry is that the underlying cultural environment limits technological advances in safety and efficiency. Following this logic, no significant advances can be made until major cultural changes occur. However, what if technology was not necessarily limited by culture, but, if applied correctly, could actually be used to drive a desired cultural change?

Read the full article entitled “Silence Kills: Can Technology Drive Meaningful Cultural Change in Healthcare” on LinkedIn

Last Chance to Register for Simulation Technology Training Event with $50 Off Code

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Join 175 other champions of simulation technology for the 4th Annual SimGHOSTS hands-on technical training event at the American College of Chest Physicians, August 5th-8th in Greater Chicago, IL! CHEST has recently opened their amazing new Innovation, Simulation and Training Center which will be host to this year’s USA event. 

REGISTER NOW BEFORE TICKETS SELL OUT!

Don’t miss out on this once a year opportunity to receive beginner, intermediate and advanced training in a dynamic range of medical simulation technology operation courses including:

  • Manikin hardware repair & preventive maintenance (all major brands)
  • Manikin programming
  • A/V recording system design & build-out
  • IT infrastructure and debugging
  • Inventory control management systems
  • Trauma moulage
  • Video and audio production
  • Sim lab “DIY” innovations
  • Basic medical knowledge for non-healthcare techs
  • Sim center building development
  • Building your own task trainer
  • Professional simulation tech development workshops
  • Many many more…

american college of chest physicians

Download the Latest #SG14USA Brochure Here

Sim Techs from as far away as Australia, the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia have already booked their flights! Join them at fun networking events like the Opening Reception at PinStripes Bowling hosted by Platinum Sponsor Level 3 Medical. In the exhibit room, tour the latest technology from 15 of the world’s leading medical simulation vendors including B-Line Medical, Laerdal, Worldpoint, CAE Healthcare and Gaumard.

Use the Unique Discount Code “healthysim” to receive $50 off your late registration!

Learn more at the SimGHOSTS 2014 USA Homepage!