3D Digital Continuity is the Future of Healthcare Education

3-D Digital Continuity Is the Future of Human Health

Sim champions it won’t be long before the entire healthcare industry is surronded by 3D Animation! We already know that designing and testing devices using 3D physical simulation is a key part of developing a commercial product. Slowly we are convincing the world that simulating and testing healthcare providers will become a key part of developing a more effictive healthcare system. Imagine watching in real-time, the human patient’s case as it developed — in 3D on the wall during diagnosis. With faster computers like IBM’s Watson — its only a matter of time! Check out the use of animation from a recent Medical Device Summit:

Steve Levine reports on The Living Heart Project which enables realistic simulation. At a time when the industry is facing some of its toughest challenges, more than 200 regulators, engineers, and healthcare leaders came together in Chicago at the American Medical Device (AMD) Summit in October, to discuss the state of the medical device industry and focus on opportunities to accelerate innovation, with increased predictability and profitability. From a regulatory, patient and payer perspective, medical device business models are changing, creating an environment that has rendered sustainable innovation elusive for many medical device companies seeking to grow their top line as well as bottom line.


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These shifts in the marketplace are pressuring the balancing act between corporate efficiency, time to market, and predictable patient outcomes. It has raised an essential question for the future of the medical device industry—how to restructure to remain competitive and compliant while simultaneously meeting the needs of the patient, provider, and enterprise? The healthcare industry is finding answers in an unlikely place, by turning to a resource traditionally associated with more traditional manufacturing industries such as automotive and aerospace.


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Video Games Improve Performance for Surgeons

video games increases surgeon performance

Recently Reuters reported on research highlighting how “video games can improve fine motor skills, eye-hand coordination, visual attention, depth perception and computer competency”. Article excerpt:

Video game skills translated into higher scores on a day-and-half-long surgical skills test, and the correlation was much higher than the surgeon’s length of training or prior experience in laparoscopic surgery, the study said. Out of 33 surgeons from Beth Israel Medical Center in New York that participated in the study, the nine doctors who had at some point played video games at least three hours per week made 37 percent fewer errors, performed 27 percent faster, and scored 42 percent better in the test of surgical skills than the 15 surgeons who had never played video games before. “It was surprising that past commercial video game play was such a strong predictor of advanced surgical skills,” said Iowa State University psychology professor Douglas Gentile, one of the study’s authors.

“Video games may be a practical teaching tool to help train surgeons,” senior author Dr. James Rosser of Beth Israel said. It supports previous research that video games can improve “fine motor skills, eye-hand coordination, visual attention, depth perception and computer competency,” the study said. “Video games may be a practical teaching tool to help train surgeons,” senior author Dr. James Rosser of Beth Israel said.

Read the full story on Reuters!

Does Residency Simulated Training Have an Impact on Patient Outcomes in Robotic Surgery

simulated training

Christopher Simmonds from Mimic Technologies recently shared on LinkedIN some interesting research statistics regarding the patient results from simulated training in surgery.

Join the World’s Largest LinkedIN Medical Simulation Group

Like any new technology, a lot of focus has been placed on ensuring that new users of robotic surgery are adequately trained. Simulation has had a large part to play with this. As the technology has become more mainstream, training requirements have moved from not only training existing surgeons but to ensuring that residents and fellows develop the required skill levels to ensure that they can adapt to the new technologies used in their practice.

Earlier this year we discussed a paper published by the EAU on their curriculum aimed at ensuring that fellows followed a clear curriculum at the end of which they would be deemed to be safe and competent to operate on patients independently. As with many ways of teaching surgery, the procedure is broken into specific steps that the trainee must master before being allowed to carry the whole procedure.

There were no differences in some key clinical outcomes such as positive margins, length of stay, catheter days, readmissions or re-operations when comparing surgeon only to resident –involved cases. There was, however, a difference seen in mean operative time between procedures that were surgeon only cases vs. resident involved (190.4 Min vs. 206.4 Min, P= 0.003)

Read the full article on LinkedIn


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Transsphenoidal Tumor Resection Surgery Simulator from Medprin

tumor surgery simulator

Medprin Biotech GmbH is a high-tech enterprise specializing in R & D and manufacturing of human tissue regenerative implantable medical devices. Recently they provided this video series on a new Transsphenoidal Tumor Resection Surgery Simulator. The solid, highly realistic training model overcomes the disadvantage of the traditional surgical training, saves training cost and time, lowers surgical risk of the new surgeons, improves the quality of the medical teaching and training.

About Medprin

MEDPRIN BIOTECH is a high-tech enterprise co-founded by outstanding biomedicine scientists in September 2008, specialized in R & D, production and sales of regenerative medicine materials and regenerative implantable medical devices. MEDPRIN aims to become global leader in the field of implantable medical devices, relying on amazing capacity to provide excellent products for the patients worldwide based on biological 3D printing technology and nano-bionics technology, so MEDPRIN will accurately and efficiently manufacture more new implantable medical devices for human tissue recovery, replacement and regeneration, in accordance with the enterprise cultures featured in “innovation, cooperation and mutual love” and the quality policy to play a leading role in science & technology capacity and quality and constantly keep sound integrity to save more lives.

More on the Medprin website!

Generic Robotics Provides New Simutouch Simulators for Healthcare Industries

generic robotics

Recently learned about a new company on the scene helping to develop new simulators! Generic Robotics got started with in Dentistry but is looking to expand into other healthcare areas soon.

SimuTouch is the first general purpose clinical skills training platform. It is based on a proven simulation software and hardware approach, which can be adapted for a wide range of clinical procedures. Generic Robotics produces training devices for clinical skills built around “haptics” – the science of touch feedback. Our dental training simulators have been developed in collaboration with leading universities and have been used by King’s College London and Portsmouth Dental Academy. We are now expanding into other medical and surgical fields, to bring our products to a wider audience.

Learn more at the Generic Robotics website today!


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Operative Experience Inc Adds Senior Executives to Expand Realistic Surgical Training Simulators

At IMSH 2012 Operative Experience Inc (OEI) caught our eye at HealthySimulation.com as a hyper realistic simulator for surgical training. At the event I had a chance to interview the founder CEO of the company Dr. Robert Buckman on OEI’s product and support from the DOD. You can read our full OEI 2012 article here, but I have relinked the video below. Today we are hearing that OEI has expanded its executive team in the goal of expanding product development and global growth. This on the recent announcement at IMSH that by Lou Oberndorf, the man who founded METI (acquired by CAE Healthcare in 2012). Thus — OEI is one to keep on your radar for new innovation products and companies in healthcare simulation!

Official Press Release

Operative Experience, Inc. (OEI), a fast rising developer of high-fidelity human simulators for surgical and pre-hospital education, today announced two additions to their executive team. Jane O’Reilly, named the new Global Vice President of Sales, and Carlos Moreno, the new Chief Technology Officer, will play major roles in OEIs’ global expansion plans. “We are thrilled to be adding these two accomplished executives to the OEI team,” said Mick Navin, President/CEO of OEI. “Our goal is to be a global leader in medical simulation. Jane and Carlos both helped grow a small simulation company into a global leader. Their experience will be invaluable as we accelerate our product development and growth.”

Jane O’Reilly comes to OEI with more than 15 years of experience growing medical simulation companies. During her 10 years at METI, O’Reilly played a leadership role in doubling overall company revenue and building out a world-class sales organization. “OEIs’ products are nothing short of revolutionary,” said O’Reilly. “The global medical simulation community has been asking for this level of realism for years. I am excited to work with the team to grow the business and the impact this has in saving lives.”

Carlos Moreno joins OEI with more than 20 years of technology leadership, including eight years as the Chief Technology Officer at METI where he led the development of iStan and METIman. “Joining OEI is an extraordinary opportunity to help an innovative young company become a significant global player in the medical simulation market,” said Moreno. “The need for OEI’s 21st century technology is real. There’s nothing like it available today. I look forward to contributing to OEIs’ future innovations and success.”

OEI produces simulators to rapidly train surgeons and medics in critical, life-saving trauma skills for cesarean section, control of postpartum hemorrhage, emergency hysterectomy, craniotomy, neck exploration, emergency thoracotomy, damage control laparotomy, fasciotomy and leg amputation. Last month, OEI announced that Louis H. Oberndorf, a pioneer in the field of healthcare simulation and the founder of METI, had made a significant investment in the company and accepted the position of Chairman. OEI’s founder, Robert Buckman, MD, a surgeon and former professor at the Temple University School of Medicine, developed the OEI technology under a series of SBIR grants from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command. The DOD is currently one of the primary users of OEI’s simulators.

About Operative Experience, Inc.

Operative Experience, Inc. is on a mission to revolutionize surgical and pre-hospital training. Using medical simulators with unprecedented anatomical and surgical fidelity within a rigorous experiential instructional paradigm, OEI reduces training costs while increasing training effectiveness and retention. OEI is dedicated to applying this technology to reduce combat and civilian surgical mortality, and to provide humanitarian support to developing countries with limited medical resources.

Learn more at the Operative Experience Inc Website!

Surgical Team Simulates Zero-Gravity Surgery

simulated space surgery

Recently on GizMag.com a story was shared on a “Healthcare Team Simulates Zero-G Surgery” utilizing the Cut Suit and a special research jet. Fascinating to think of the additional problems that need to be worked out in space, that only a special simulated environment can even begin to mimic.

Article Excerpt: “Surgery on Earth is hard enough, but at least the patient and all his insides stay put thanks to gravity. In zero gravity, things get a lot more complicated – the patient needs to be secured, organs drift where they aren’t supposed to, and blood could quickly become unmanageable. It’s one of those situations where hands-on experience is hard to come by, so a team lead by Major Andrew Kirkpatrick MD decided to experiment closer to home with a patient that isn’t quite real.

The operation was conducted on June 26 about a Canadian National research Council Falcon 20 jet from Ottawa/Macdonald–Cartier International Airport, which flew in parabolic arcs similar to those flown by NASA’s famous “vomit comet.” During these arcs, when the plane is at its zenith, the passengers experience up to 30 seconds of weightlessness. During these moments, the US/Canadian surgical team carried out a proof-of-concept emergency laparotomy operation to treat a blunt trauma to the torso. This was selected because internal bleeding is relatively easy to treat, but is also very likely to be quickly fatal if unattended.

The “patient” in this case was a “Cut Suit” made by the Strategic Operations firm, which specializes in extremely realistic field simulations. In this case, the Cut Suit is a vest complete with internal organs and simulated blood that fits over the chest of an actor, who yells and generally carries on while the surgeon practices dealing with field trauma. However, in this operation, the actor was replaced with a computer and a set of sensors that can detect the force of gravity. When the plane was weightless, pumps activated to simulate bleeding. When gravity returned, the pumps stopped and the operation was put on hold until the next weightless episode. The computer also kept track of flight data, blood loss, and other factors for late evaluation on the ground.

Meanwhile, the system also monitored sensors worn by the surgeons to record their physiological readings and cameras recorded the operation itself. During the experiment, the team also tested a self-expanding foam developed to control bleeding.”

To get a closer look at the Cut Suit check out our video demonstration!


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10 More Ways Virtual Reality is Revolutionizing Healthcare

medical-simulation-virtual-reality

Continuing our exploration of virtual reality today, here is a great article from TechRepublic entitled “10 ways Virtual Reality is Revolutionizing Medicine and Healthcare“. We should think of virtual reality not just in terms of what it can provide for healthcare professionals in terms of training, but also for rehabilitation and patient education.

“When people experience virtual reality for the first time, a common reaction is to start imagining all the different uses the technology might hold. Even within one industry, healthcare, the potential is open-ended. The good thing is that scientists and medical professionals have been at the drawing board for years now, developing and implementing virtual reality in ways that can help them train, diagnose, and treat in myriad situations.

Here are just ten of the use cases that are currently in practice and continually developing as the technology itself develops too:

  • Exposure therapy
  • Treatment for PTSD
  • Pain management
  • Surgical training
  • Phantom limb pain
  • Brain damage assessment and rehabilitation
  • Social cognition training for young adults with autism
  • Meditation Opportunities for the disabled
  • Opportunities for the homebound

I would add mass casualty scene management, patient assessment, ED scenarios and patient movement to the list. Here’s another list of VR’s affect in healthcare with some great videos on HuffintonPost.com:

  • Soothing Burn Victims’ Painful Therapy
  • Curing Phantom Pains In Amputee Victims
  • Therapy For Soldiers Suffering From PTSD
  • Treating Children With Autism
  • Allowing Surgical Students To Practice Techniques

 

Read the full TechRepublic article here and the HuffingtonPost Article here.

Let us know how you are using virtual reality for your healthcare programs!

CAE Healthcare Now Distributes VirtaMed Surgical Simulators to North America

virtamed surgical simulators

In HealthySim’s IMSH 2015 Exhibit Hall Highlights Reel, we shared that CAE Healthcare is now distributing European-based VirtaMed’s ArthroS Surgical Simulator in North America. ArthoS can easily swap out knee, shoulder, and FAST modules. The VirtaMed ArthroS offers risk-free training for knee and shoulder arthroscopy in a virtual reality environment. Learners practice with original surgical tools, and the anatomical rubber models provide the most accurate and realistic tactile sensation available today. Learner’s movements are captured on video, and the simulator records and stores performance data for objective assessment and debrief.

Knee Module:

The module presents basic skills, diagnostic and surgical cases for knee arthroscopy. 9 guided basic skill training cases fully integrated into a realistic simulation. Mastering these basic tasks enables trainees to perform a complete arthroscopy more easily and in an efficient, professional way. 8 patient cases with varying level of difficulty offer the trainee the chance to perform complete diagnostic arthroscopic interventions. Patients include different meniscus lesions, unhappy triad and arthrosis grade I-III. 11 patients with various lesions in different locations provide training for the first steps in operative arthroscopy using the operating equipment. Patients include different meniscus lesions, synovitial membrane inflammations and loose body removal.

Shoulder Module:

10 guided basic skill training cases fully integrated into a realistic simulation. Mastering these basic tasks enables trainees to perform a complete shoulder arthroscopy more easily and in an efficient, professional way. 10 different patients with varying level of difficulty offer the trainee the chance to perform complete diagnostic arthroscopic interventions. Patients include different lesions in rotator cuff and impingement syndrome. 7 patients with various lesions in different locations provide training for first steps in operative arthroscopy using OR equipment. Patients include loose body removal, subacromial debridement and decompression.

FAST Module:

9 motor skill training tasks on the FAST workstation guide the trainee through the first steps of arthroscopy. Basic camera navigation tasks include steadiness and image centering, horizon control and telescoping as well as the use of different optics – using both left and right hand for camera handling as well as frontal and posterior access to the FAST shell. This very basic arthroscopy skills training also teaches periscoping. Trainees learn how to detect and center an object, probe and grasp static objects, and develop triangulation skills.

Learn more at the CAE Healthcare VirtaMed ArthroS website!

Interesting Medical Simulation Studies & Research Twitter Feed

healthcare simulation research 2014

Some interesting simulation studies have recently been published. Thanks to Tim Willet (@SIMtim_one) for highlighting these and many more research articles for medical simulation! Follow Tim for continuous links to the latest medical simulation research!

Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey. (Qayumi K, Pachev G, Zheng B, Ziv A, Koval V, Badiei S, Cheng A.) – Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

We recommend that educational and health care authorities, as well as accreditation and licensing bodies, support the integration of simulation into health care education for all learner groups. This can be achieved by:

  • Recognizing simulation-based education as a central modality in the maintenance of competencies in health care
  • Setting standards on the expected proficiencies of health care professionals, and identifying how simulation can assist in achieving and maintaining those standards
  • Designing and delivering simulation curriculum for patient safety, professionalism and advocacy-related competencies
  • Encouraging collaboration between and within institutions to promote sharing of existing and new curriculum and expertise.

To promote the growth of simulation-based research on a global scale, we recommend the development of improved opportunities for collaboration and networking. These opportunities will enhance expertise, expand potential for multicenter simulation studies, and further the quality of future simulation-based research. Here, Visit our HealthySimAdmin pages to gain free access to eight administrative sessions.

Central venous access by trainees: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the use of simulation to improve success rate on patients. (Madenci AL, Solis CV, de Moya MA.) – Simulation training for invasive procedures may improve patient safety by enabling efficient training. This study is a meta-analysis with rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria designed to assess the real patient procedural success of simulation training for central venous access. We identified 550 studies, of which 5 (3 randomized controlled trials, 2 prospective 2-group cohort studies) studies of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion were included in the meta-analysis, composed of 407 medical trainees. The simulation group had a significantly larger proportion of trainees who successfully placed CVCs (RR, 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.16, P<0.01). In addition, the simulation group had significantly fewer mean attempts to CVC insertion (weighted mean difference, -1.42; 95% CI, -2.34 to -0.49, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the rate of adverse events between the groups (RR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.19-1.29; P=0.15). CONCLUSIONS: Training programs should consider adopting simulation training for CVC insertion to improve the real patient procedural success of trainees.

Emergency medicine resident crisis resource management ability: a simulation-based longitudinal study. (Clarke S, Horeczko T, Carlisle M, Barton JD, Ng V, Al-Somali S, Bair AE.) – Simulation has been identified as a means of assessing resident physicians’ mastery of technical skills, but there is a lack of evidence for its utility in longitudinal assessments of residents’ non-technical clinical abilities. We evaluated the growth of crisis resource management (CRM) skills in the simulation setting using a validated tool, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (Ottawa GRS). We hypothesized that the Ottawa GRS would reflect progressive growth of CRM ability throughout residency. Ottawa GRS scores increased over time, and the domains of leadership, problem solving, and resource utilization, in particular, were predictive of overall performance. There was a significant gain in all Ottawa GRS components between postgraduate years 1 and 2, but no significant difference in GRS performance between years 2 and 3. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, CRM skills are progressive abilities, and simulation is a useful modality for tracking their development. Modification of this tool may be needed to assess advanced learners’ gains in performance.

From Time-Based to Competency-Based Standards: Core Transitional Competencies in Plastic Surgery. (Lutz K, Yazdani A, Ross D.) – Competency-based medical education is becoming increasingly prevalent and is likely to be mandated by the Royal College in the near future. The objective of this study was to define the core technical competencies that should be possessed by plastic surgery residents as they transition into their senior (presently postgraduate year 3) years of training. Overall, 26 competencies have been identified as “core” for plastic surgery residents to possess as they begin their senior, on-service years. The nature of these skills makes them suitable for teaching in a formal, simulated environment, which would ensure that all plastic surgery trainees are competent in these tasks as they transition to their senior years of residency.