National Youth Leadership Forum Introduces Students to Medicine Through Simulation

National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine Features Stanford-Developed Simulation

Shouldn’t all perspective students of healthcare careers experience the role through simulation? Imagine a future where students could experience the role of healthcare provider with a simulated clinical learning experience, or putting on a VR headset to see what its like to be a firefighter, nurse, or surgeon? NYLF is paving the way this year!

Students attending Envision’s summer 2017 National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine will have the unique opportunity to get hands-on experience in an emergency medical simulation, When Care is Hours Away. This dynamic workshop gives high school students an immersive experience to gain invaluable, real-life medical skills that are critical success in a future career and beyond.

The simulation was created in collaboration with wilderness medicine expert Dr. Paul Auerbach and simulation expert Dr. Rebecca Smith-Coggins, professors in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. NYLF Medicine students will learn first-hand how to care for a patient in an emergency using only the materials at hand, employing time-tested techniques that are used around the world.



“We’re proud to have some of the most well-regarded and prominent leaders, educators, and physicians in the medical community provide support to and directly participate in NYLF Medicine, speaking to student groups and designing exciting curriculum modules like this simulation,” says Andrew Potter, Chief Academic Officer at Envision. “Not all emergencies take place in hospitals, so it is crucial for students to have skills in spine precautions, tying a tourniquet, hypothermia prevention, and more.”

Held in nine U.S. cities, NYLF Medicine represents an opportunity for aspiring doctors and medical professionals to get hands-on experience and valuable insight from health care professionals that will help them succeed in their future medical studies and careers. Program attendees visit a state-of-the-art medical simulation center to train like professionals in a variety of medical procedures and technologies with guidance from experts.


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Canadian Simulationists Breathe Life Into Training Manikins

Simulationists breathe life into training manikins

The press coverage of healthcare simulation continues to catch the public’s attention at facilities across the world! Recently this awesome article covered the work of Canadian-based Fanshawe College nursing simulations, and the connection to Ontario’s SIM-One group:

Fanshawe nursing students work with a simulator to hook up a colonoscopy bag. Christine Link sits inside a small room with two-way glass, watching a young woman in the classroom beyond. The nursing student seems unsure what to do with an elderly male patient in the bed in front of her. She lingers by the supply cart, as if looking for something. Link speaks through a microphone, which comes out of the manikin as a scratchy, old-man’s voice. She is playing the role of George, a grumpy senior with a respiratory condition. “Get me a drink of water,” commands Link. George has dirty tissues filled with fake mucus scattered around him. As the student fetches a cup, Link explains that she is waiting for the perfect teaching moment. “I would have the student hold it up to my mouth, and that’s when I’d cough.”

Link is one of a growing number of simulation experts working in medical, paramedic and nursing programs across the country. “Health care has really come a long way in how we teach and present material,” she says. “No longer are we injecting into an orange.” Link, who graduated from the practical nursing program at Fanshawe College in 2007, returned to the Ontario school as a part-time lab technician the following year. After stints as an instructor, in 2013 she became the simulation technologist, now responsible for running 15 manikins.

At SIM-one in Toronto, a non-profit, national networking, training and R&D organization with 1,700 members involved in health-care simulation, CEO Timothy Willett says every college and university in the country has adopted the technique. In Ontario alone, 78 different programs and labs are using a total of 1,236 manikins and thousands more simulation tools.

SIM-one offers several online and in-person courses, including the brand-new 12-week Simulation Scenario Writing, Roleplay Theatre and Simulation Wizardry. They also train experienced simulationists to run their own courses, and each year about 15 to 20 are certified as simulation educators after they have completed three courses at a total cost of about $2,000. “As far as I know, there’s no kind of college programs you can go to with the intent of getting into that role,” says Willett.

3D Digital Continuity is the Future of Healthcare Education

3-D Digital Continuity Is the Future of Human Health

Sim champions it won’t be long before the entire healthcare industry is surronded by 3D Animation! We already know that designing and testing devices using 3D physical simulation is a key part of developing a commercial product. Slowly we are convincing the world that simulating and testing healthcare providers will become a key part of developing a more effictive healthcare system. Imagine watching in real-time, the human patient’s case as it developed — in 3D on the wall during diagnosis. With faster computers like IBM’s Watson — its only a matter of time! Check out the use of animation from a recent Medical Device Summit:

Steve Levine reports on The Living Heart Project which enables realistic simulation. At a time when the industry is facing some of its toughest challenges, more than 200 regulators, engineers, and healthcare leaders came together in Chicago at the American Medical Device (AMD) Summit in October, to discuss the state of the medical device industry and focus on opportunities to accelerate innovation, with increased predictability and profitability. From a regulatory, patient and payer perspective, medical device business models are changing, creating an environment that has rendered sustainable innovation elusive for many medical device companies seeking to grow their top line as well as bottom line.

These shifts in the marketplace are pressuring the balancing act between corporate efficiency, time to market, and predictable patient outcomes. It has raised an essential question for the future of the medical device industry—how to restructure to remain competitive and compliant while simultaneously meeting the needs of the patient, provider, and enterprise? The healthcare industry is finding answers in an unlikely place, by turning to a resource traditionally associated with more traditional manufacturing industries such as automotive and aerospace.


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Delta College Performs 6 Hour Trauma Simulation Scenario with Local Authories

long medical simulations

Recently this awesome update was shared by Lori Kloc, MSN, RN, CHSE Simulation Education Specialist at Delta College:

On April 5 Delta College brought seven healthcare disciplines together to participate in one 6-hour trauma scenario. The scenario centered around a victim of an auto accident and included trauma rescue/transport, triage, two surgical procedures, infant resuscitation, post-operative care, and rehabilitation. This scenario was important because it allowed students from various levels of education and disciplines to learn with, from, and about each other in collaborative care of two patients. Simulation is a method of active learning, where students have the opportunity to practice care in a safe setting, promoting teamwork and collaboration while reinforcing skills learned in their academic setting. The objective of simulated learning is the transfer of skills and behaviors to the clinical setting, positively impacting safe patient care.

In this simulation, Mobile Medical Response (MMR) joined the division to add their expertise as first responders for our victim. The simulation will included a mock automobile accident with trauma to a pregnant woman, two surgical procedures, emergency care for the newborn who will be born via C-section but will have sustained injury, and post-op/rehab care for the victim.

Read more on the Delta College Website

Free Webinar May 7th: Nursing & Theatre Department Collaborative Simulations

nursing simulations with theatre students

Last week I mentioned that SimulationIQ from Education Management Solutions had a great database of medical simulation whitepapers and recorded webinars. Learn all about the EMS database of clinical simulation content here. I just received word that the next free online webinar is taking place May 7th and is entitled “A Collaborative Simulation: Nursing and Theatre Departments Use Forum Theatre to Teach End-of-Life Skills”. Even if you are not at a campus with a theatre program, medical simulation programs should consider reaching out to local schools or theatre groups to explore collaborative relationships as this provides a unique and mutually beneficial exercise for both groups.

Presented by:
Patricia M. (Wall) McCauley, MSN, RN
Director, Clinical Resource and Simulation Center
Regis College, School of Nursing, Science, and Health Professions

And Janis Tuxbury, DNP, FNP-BC
Nursing Faculty
Regis College, School of Nursing, Science, and Health Professions

Abstract: Nursing students must gain knowledge and develop skills in end-of-life care as part of their education. However, students may not have the opportunity during their clinical experiences to care for such a patient. A collaborative effort between the nursing and theatre departments at one college addresses this possible deficit. The webinar will describe the method of forum theatre and explain how it has been used to teach end-of-life nursing skills.

Wednesday, May 7 at 2:00 pm EDT (1:00 pm CDT12:00 pm MDT11:00 am PDT)

Click here to register for this FREE webinar event!

Learn more about Regis College here.


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Ready for your Close-Up: How to Overcome ‘Camera-shy’ Simulation Learners

A stranger shows up unannounced at your house Saturday morning with a camera crew.  He requests to video an immediate interview in your house about your greatest weaknesses. Would you let them in without a single hesitation?

Now, do you expect your simulation learners to answer that question any differently?

Simulation asks a lot from learners, much more than just acting professionally and performing well. They must also knowingly enter and maintain legitimacy of an unknown and fabricated environment.  All of which must be done under the watchful eye of peers and supervisors (or faculty).  And sometimes that watchful eye is the only element putting learners over the edge.

So if we do not relax the anxiety that some learners have about being video taped, they will only ever provide whatever mental commitment is left after the “you are on camera” thought process continues to occur.  And then we aren’t utilizing simulation to the full potential of the learner, the lab, the facilitator or the program. So how to cure the camera shy?

Click to learn more…