Actors Play Patients to Train Medical Students for Real-Life Work

Actors play patients to train medical students for real-life work

 

More great simulation news from Singapore this week, with an article highlighting the use of Standardized Patients to help medical students learn. Read last week’s article about the new partnership between SingHealth and the SCDF for paramedic simulation training.

Excerpt from StraitTimes:

Medical schools are turning to part-time actors to help students polish their bedside manners, long before they reach a real patient’s bedside. The actors take part in elaborate role plays, simulating patients to help mimic the challenges of hospital work. This could mean playing a distraught family member, a patient who cannot speak English or a senior doctor.

“I’m driven very much by the fact that it gives me a chance to help put the doctors’ hearts into medicine,” said Mr Davin Boo, who used to be a bit-part actor and is now self- employed.



The 48-year-old has been part of the National University of Singapore (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine’s programme for the past three years.

Even with acting experience, he said that working as a simulated patient can be challenging as it requires improvisation. I’ve been lectured by doctors or felt judged, or just treated as a figure in a ward. It’s wonderfully satisfying to be able to help change that. DAPHNE ONG, a professional actress, on what she hopes to achieve by working as a simulated patient. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As a simulated patient, you may be able to pre- empt responses, but it’s not a fixed script on the other end.”

Retired teacher Eugene Eu, 58, said that he likes the ability to interact with young people and – a personal bonus – understand what his daughter has to deal with. “My daughter has just started doing her nursing diploma and, with this experience that I have, I’m able to empathise with her,” he said. “We have this thing in common.”

NUS has around 160 such actors, while the new Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has around 100. Associate Professor May Lim, who is programme director for occupational therapy at SIT, said: “We decided it’s very important for students to learn from the people they will be treating, through interaction in the community and beyond a clinical setting.”


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News Agency Covers the Leadership Behind the Healthcare Simulation Success Story

J. Cedar Wang, MSN, RN, GNP-BC, CHSE

NorthJersey.com recently did a profile of  J. Cedar Wang, director of simulation education at Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck. HealthySim really appreciates that this news agency did a piece sharing the professional career of a healthcare simulation champion — which helps to get the word out about the progress and power of simulation to the general community! Usually such news articles focus on the center and the equipment of simulation — so we thought this was a different and much needed angle on the people who make healthcare simulation work!

NorthJersey Excerpt:

J. Cedar Wang oversees the only hospital-based health care simulation training center in north Jersey. The Institute for Simulation Learning “seeks to train anyone along the continuum of care, including physicians, nurses, social workers, first responders, even the front desk staff,” she says. Essentially, simulation learning is the process of recreating real-life medical scenarios for training purposes. It has long been used the by the military and aeronautics industries, but it’s increasingly being tapped by health care professionals who see the life-saving potential of training in a hands-on, high-pressure environment that mirrors typical and extreme emergency situations.

“We’ve come to realize that we can do better,” she says, referencing the opportunity to “improve both the collective medical response to an emergency situation and the patient experience through compassionate communication and other soft skills.”

Since the institute opened in 2013, Wang and her team have trained more than 5,000 people, averaging 400 “learner encounters” a month, in areas ranging from cardiac arrest to dementia sensitivity training. In Wang, Holy Name could hardly have found a better person for the job. A highly trained advanced practice nurse, gifted communicator and passionate educator, she possesses such a unique skill set that she easily balances simulation training with other duties ranging from grant writing and fundraising to marketing and, incredibly, construction management.

In 2016, Wang oversaw a 4,800-square-foot expansion of the simulation program, which was made possible by a $5 million grant from the Russell Berrie Foundation. The facility now features new simulated settings, including an apartment and a doctor’s office, as well as additional patient care rooms and a dual-purpose room that can be staged as an operating room or emergency room. “From cardiac arrest to seizures and childbirth, we are able to simulate every type of situation,” says Wang, explaining the crises her team of six full-team staff members (and their high-fidelity simulators) are capable of portraying.

National Youth Leadership Forum Introduces Students to Medicine Through Simulation

National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine Features Stanford-Developed Simulation

Shouldn’t all perspective students of healthcare careers experience the role through simulation? Imagine a future where students could experience the role of healthcare provider with a simulated clinical learning experience, or putting on a VR headset to see what its like to be a firefighter, nurse, or surgeon? NYLF is paving the way this year!

Students attending Envision’s summer 2017 National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine will have the unique opportunity to get hands-on experience in an emergency medical simulation, When Care is Hours Away. This dynamic workshop gives high school students an immersive experience to gain invaluable, real-life medical skills that are critical success in a future career and beyond.

The simulation was created in collaboration with wilderness medicine expert Dr. Paul Auerbach and simulation expert Dr. Rebecca Smith-Coggins, professors in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. NYLF Medicine students will learn first-hand how to care for a patient in an emergency using only the materials at hand, employing time-tested techniques that are used around the world.

“We’re proud to have some of the most well-regarded and prominent leaders, educators, and physicians in the medical community provide support to and directly participate in NYLF Medicine, speaking to student groups and designing exciting curriculum modules like this simulation,” says Andrew Potter, Chief Academic Officer at Envision. “Not all emergencies take place in hospitals, so it is crucial for students to have skills in spine precautions, tying a tourniquet, hypothermia prevention, and more.”

Held in nine U.S. cities, NYLF Medicine represents an opportunity for aspiring doctors and medical professionals to get hands-on experience and valuable insight from health care professionals that will help them succeed in their future medical studies and careers. Program attendees visit a state-of-the-art medical simulation center to train like professionals in a variety of medical procedures and technologies with guidance from experts.


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Canadian Simulationists Breathe Life Into Training Manikins

Simulationists breathe life into training manikins

The press coverage of healthcare simulation continues to catch the public’s attention at facilities across the world! Recently this awesome article covered the work of Canadian-based Fanshawe College nursing simulations, and the connection to Ontario’s SIM-One group:

Fanshawe nursing students work with a simulator to hook up a colonoscopy bag. Christine Link sits inside a small room with two-way glass, watching a young woman in the classroom beyond. The nursing student seems unsure what to do with an elderly male patient in the bed in front of her. She lingers by the supply cart, as if looking for something. Link speaks through a microphone, which comes out of the manikin as a scratchy, old-man’s voice. She is playing the role of George, a grumpy senior with a respiratory condition. “Get me a drink of water,” commands Link. George has dirty tissues filled with fake mucus scattered around him. As the student fetches a cup, Link explains that she is waiting for the perfect teaching moment. “I would have the student hold it up to my mouth, and that’s when I’d cough.”

Link is one of a growing number of simulation experts working in medical, paramedic and nursing programs across the country. “Health care has really come a long way in how we teach and present material,” she says. “No longer are we injecting into an orange.” Link, who graduated from the practical nursing program at Fanshawe College in 2007, returned to the Ontario school as a part-time lab technician the following year. After stints as an instructor, in 2013 she became the simulation technologist, now responsible for running 15 manikins.

At SIM-one in Toronto, a non-profit, national networking, training and R&D organization with 1,700 members involved in health-care simulation, CEO Timothy Willett says every college and university in the country has adopted the technique. In Ontario alone, 78 different programs and labs are using a total of 1,236 manikins and thousands more simulation tools.

SIM-one offers several online and in-person courses, including the brand-new 12-week Simulation Scenario Writing, Roleplay Theatre and Simulation Wizardry. They also train experienced simulationists to run their own courses, and each year about 15 to 20 are certified as simulation educators after they have completed three courses at a total cost of about $2,000. “As far as I know, there’s no kind of college programs you can go to with the intent of getting into that role,” says Willett.

Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond Books and Train in New $1M Healthcare Simulation Center

Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond the Books, Train in Simulation CenterAnother article showcasing how the media can cover your simulation program! Read our tutorial on how to gather such public attention for your simulation program here!

Nursing students at the Hibbing Community College (HCC) are stepping out of the classroom, into a realistic hospital room setting and learning how to treat patients in life and death situations. The newly remodeled HCC Healthcare Simulation Center opened this semester and is transforming the way students train. The state-of-the art simulation allows the students to go beyond the book and gain real-life experience that comes without the risk of working on real people.

“Students can come in and practice clinical with patients from birth all the way up to death, and they can do it in a safe environment,” explained Sandy Gustafson, nursing program director at HCC. “They can actually do the hands-on care in critical or unusual situations that they wouldn’t get in a facility that’s in a rural area.” The mannequins talk, breath, blink, cough, puke and bleed like a real human would. One of the female robots even gives birth.

“We can assess them in a way that’s different than just learning from a book because we’re just pretending there,” said Brandy Mass, a first-year nursing student. “If you don’t have that experience behind you with the simulation, then you risk the chance of freezing or not knowing what to do or drawing a blank,” said Ashton Martin, a first-year nursing student. “This prevents us from feeling that nervousness.”


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3D Digital Continuity is the Future of Healthcare Education

3-D Digital Continuity Is the Future of Human Health

Sim champions it won’t be long before the entire healthcare industry is surronded by 3D Animation! We already know that designing and testing devices using 3D physical simulation is a key part of developing a commercial product. Slowly we are convincing the world that simulating and testing healthcare providers will become a key part of developing a more effictive healthcare system. Imagine watching in real-time, the human patient’s case as it developed — in 3D on the wall during diagnosis. With faster computers like IBM’s Watson — its only a matter of time! Check out the use of animation from a recent Medical Device Summit:

Steve Levine reports on The Living Heart Project which enables realistic simulation. At a time when the industry is facing some of its toughest challenges, more than 200 regulators, engineers, and healthcare leaders came together in Chicago at the American Medical Device (AMD) Summit in October, to discuss the state of the medical device industry and focus on opportunities to accelerate innovation, with increased predictability and profitability. From a regulatory, patient and payer perspective, medical device business models are changing, creating an environment that has rendered sustainable innovation elusive for many medical device companies seeking to grow their top line as well as bottom line.

These shifts in the marketplace are pressuring the balancing act between corporate efficiency, time to market, and predictable patient outcomes. It has raised an essential question for the future of the medical device industry—how to restructure to remain competitive and compliant while simultaneously meeting the needs of the patient, provider, and enterprise? The healthcare industry is finding answers in an unlikely place, by turning to a resource traditionally associated with more traditional manufacturing industries such as automotive and aerospace.

You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

new tech in healthcare

Chris Merritt, recently wrote an article for McKnights News on the evolution of healthcare education through modern day technologies — which should be forwarded along to simulation discomfiters, or naysayers, in your simulation program! Chris theorizes that online gaming is the future of healthcare education!

The rapid advancements in technology continuously impact our lives on a daily basis and each new week brings a critical update to our attention. This has significantly changed the ways in which we receive and process information such as current events, the daily news, industry updates, association content, medical journals and even our educational materials. You do not need to look any further than a grade-school classroom in which personal tablets have replaced pencil and paper for our youngest generation. This transformation has occurred not because it is the cheapest alternative, in fact this migration can often times be more expensive on the front-end.

We are changing our educational delivery mechanisms due to improved learner experience, retention and overall knowledge outcomes. A 2008 study by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation reported that a great lecture can improve learning outcomes by 17%, while switching to a different delivery mechanism such as serious gaming can improve learning outcomes by 108%.

Many have acknowledged the explicit need for our healthcare professionals to have a safe environment in which to practice, make mistakes and increase their proficiency in the many critical decisions they make on a daily basis without putting a patient at risk. A 2015 study in The Journal of Clinical Nursing reported in 2015 that, “Finding a new platform to allow all nurses to practice difficult clinical decisions is key. A virtual immersive environment…can provide simulation for nurses to practice making such difficult decisions.”

The evidence is present that these online simulations increase learner engagement and retention while also resulting in improved patient outcomes and a positive impact on healthcare economics. One chronic disease specific online simulation called SiMCare Diabetes has published data which reports: improved glycemic control in patients with A1C >7%, a 60% reduction in the prescription of contraindicated medication and reduced cost by $71 per patient versus those professionals that did not train with the simulation.

Advances in medical education, clinical content, guidelines and standards of care now have a new and improved medium for dissemination. Online training simulations and educational games are continually updated in real-time and given the nature of the platform, content can be rapidly deployed around the globe with the click of a button.


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Aeromedical Evacuation Crews Score Their First Flight Simulators

Aeromedical Evacuation Crews Score Their First Flight Simulators

Combining aviation and healthcare simulation into one experience? That’s the power of working with CAE Healthcare! In today’s story we share how the Air Force is combing simulation experiences for both aviation and healthcare crews:

In the back of a C-130 Hercules, a woman is giving birth. Like many other women, she is confused and nervous during the process, lashing out when a nurse touches her arm and anxiously calling out for her baby after delivering.

As lifelike as the scenario is, almost everything about the situation is fake, from the aircraft itself — actually a training system meant to replicate the fuselage of the C-130 — to the woman, a mannequin capable of blinking, speech and delivering a small mannequin baby. To the military nurses and medical technicians taking care of the clockwork woman and her newborn, this is as close to real as they can possibly get until they’re face-to-face with a human patient.

Air Force pilots typically practice their skills via ground-based fuselage trainers, as do many specialized crew positions like the C-17 loadmasters responsible for air dropping supplies. But until just recently, aeromedical personnel were forced to rely on either flight-based training or less immersive ground-based simulations where they would act out scenarios in a normal classroom, said Lt. Col. Chad Corliss, deputy commander of the 94th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron.

MedicActiV from France-Based SimForHealth Showcased at Stanford MedicineX

simhealth france medicactiv

SimforHealth is an international start-up with offices in Canada and headquarters in France which brings together healthcare professionals, education expert and 3D engineers to create virtual training solutions for medical education. SimforHealth is recognized by BPI France as one of the 2,000 most innovative companies in France in 2016.

SimforHealth has created MedicActiV,the first digital simulation platform dedicated to health training. It was created to meet the initial and continuing needs of health professionals for e-service training, on site or remotely. They believe many healthcare professionals is that virtual clinical cases can provide an important complementary, innovative contribution to the overall training process. It is an essential link between theory and the reality in the field MedicActiV seeks to disseminate this technology and innovative approach to education as widely as possible through collaboration.

Are you near California this week? MedicActiV has been selected for a device demo in the Tech Tent (On Friday September 16th – Ten on Alumni Lawn 2:40PM-3:40PM. During the demo their team will show how MedicActiV is a really good solution to improve the international medical education by virtual clinical cases. You can download the MedX event agenda here.

Learn more about SimForHealthMedicActiV and the Stanford MedicineX Conference!

Save $200 on WISER’s October iSIM Course to Improve Simulation Instructional Methods

simulation instructional training course

Save $200 on the October iSIM course provided at the UPMC WISER Center with this special HealthySim discount code!

Improving Simulation Instructional Methods Assessment, Debriefing, Comprehensive, and Development are just a few words that describe WISER’s iSIM Improving Simulation Instructional Methods (iSIM) course.

iSIM is a three (3)-day immersive program designed to cover the fundamental skills for the creation and delivery of high quality simulation-based healthcare education through a variety of techniques and technologies while emphasizing hands-on learning through active participation.

The program is intended for healthcare professionals and educators who are interested in improving their instructional skills. Each participant will engage in an interactive experience and gain knowledge and skills to enhance their ability to design and conduct simulation-based learning and assessment activities.

The course has been designed and is actively facilitated by internationally renowned experts in simulation and faculty development from WISER at The University of Pittsburgh, and The Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education at the University of Miami. This course will prepare educators to enhance their skills using simulation methods. The iSIM course is held at WISER in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania three times a year.

Register now for the next available iSIM course in October and save $200 by using the discount code (WISER!).

Visit the WISER website to learn more & enroll today!