Basic Simulation Specialist Training from Jump Simulation in Chicago March 31st

jump simulation workshop chicago

The always innovative Jump Simulation center has partnered with Chicago-based healthcare startup incubator MATTER to offer a 1-day “intro to healthcare simulation operations”. Jump Trading Simulation Center in Peoria IL was the 2016 host of the SimGHOSTS USA conference and is creating additional opportunities for regional healthcare programs to better learn how to operate simulation based technologies.

Date & Time: Friday, March 31st 8am-4pm
Location: MATTER (Healthcare Startup Incubator) in Chicago, IL
Cost: $395.00
Capacity: 15
Instructor: Kristi Sanders

Jump Simulation’s one-day course is an introduction to healthcare simulation from an operational standpoint. The training program is designed to provide hands on learning to plan, prepare, and execute a simulation event. Topics for the course include:

  • Simulation center technology
  • Simulation terminology
  • Supporting faculty and courses
  • Calendar management
  • Basic Laerdal manikin assembly
  • Basic Laerdal manikin troubleshooting
  • Running the Simulation
  • And activities required post simulation

What is MATTER?



MATTER is a community of healthcare innovators, an incubator of ideas, and a catalyst for change. We are boots-on-the-ground entrepreneurs pushing against the status quo and established institutions dedicated to improving patients’ lives. At MATTER we are all hungry for change, and we’re working together to solve real and complex healthcare problems.

About Jump

Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center (Jump) is an incubator where collaboration and innovation lead the transformation of health care worldwide. Jump programs and objectives are key to improving the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of care for community members across the region. A collaboration between OSF HealthCare and University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria (UICOMP), Jump advances the Missions of both organizations.

Register for this workshop here!


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Royal College of Emergency Medicine Provides Safety Toolkit Including Simulation Resource Links

royal college patient safety toolkit healthcare simulation

Published in 2013 this Royal College of Emergency Medicine toolkit, prepared by the Safer Care Committee, is a useful starting point in providing the quality of patient care through the lens of patient safety which includes sections of the utilization of simulation.

What is the Toolkit?

This safety tool kit aims to describe the structures, processes and skills required for a ‘safe’ department. The original concept was that it would enable any Emergency Physician, starting from scratch, to construct a safety framework that contained all the key elements necessary to support the delivery of high quality care whilst at the same time being vigilant to ongoing risks. We acknowledge that in reality the majority of Emergency Departments will already have well established structures for ensuring safe care but it is also probable that not all elements are as effective as they should be; so we hope this toolkit will provide something useful for all.

Ruth Brown explains how to use the safety toolkit

This toolkit is provided to Fellows as a comprehensive (but not exhaustive) resource for delivering safe care. We know many departments already have really good systems in place, whilst others are still developing them. It is also provided as a resource for senior trainees in thinking about their future role as a consultant. We suggest you could use this resource in a number of different ways:

  1. In your local departmental meetings – Ensuring that safety is considered in the meeting or by having specific safety meetings. We have included suggested agendas for such meetings in our toolkit section Departmental Activity Resources.’
  2. Working through the toolkit – You could take a section at a time, say over a year, and review the resources as a team, perhaps as a consultant CPD session or by asking an StR to present a summary. This embeds the content in everyone’s psyche and lends an importance to it.
  3. By discussing key topics with your managers and ensuring that all business plans and service developments are prepared using the toolkit as a resource for your document.
  4. Modeling your in –house education using the resources or accessing your Trust quality and safety team to deliver the education with you – they can add a dimension to the clinical content by talking about real cases from a risk perspective.
  5. One of the key chapters is Supporting the Second Victim. This is a relatively new concept and is particularly welcomed by staff. This might be the first section of the toolkit you review together as it will engage staff very early on.

Read the full resource with links here

American Academy of Pediatrics & Kognito Launch Simulation System to Train Pediatricians

kognito simulation

The American Academy of Pediatrics and Kognito recently announced the launch of Artificial Perfection: Talking to Teens about Performance Enhancement – a free, role-play simulation designed to prepare pediatricians and other child health professionals to lead real-life conversation with teens about appearance and performance-enhancing substances.

About Kognito

Kognito is a healthcare simulation company that believes in the power of conversation to inspire and inform, impact how people think and act, evoke empathy, and change lives. We are pioneers in developing research-proven, role-play simulations that prepare individuals to lead real-life conversations. We build and assess their confidence and competency by providing them the ability to practice conversations with our growing family of emotionally-responsive virtual people. Our innovative approach uses the science of learning, the art of conversation and the power of game technology to measurably improve social, emotional, and physical health. Leading health, education, government, and non-profit organizations use our growing portfolio of simulations. Kognito is the only company with health simulations listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP).

Press Release Excerpt:

The use of appearance and performance-enhancing substances among youth has increased tremendously over the past decade. More than 10 percent of adolescents have misused prescription stimulants for cognitive enhancement, and about 6 percent of the general high school population has used illegal steroids for appearance or strength enhancement. Physicians should be aware of the use of performance-enhancing substances by pediatric patients; be prepared to identify risk factors, signs, and symptoms; ask screening questions; and offer anticipatory guidance related to their use.

This innovative simulation engages users in role-play conversations with three virtual and emotionally responsive patients presenting with signs of appearance and performance-enhancing substances. As the health professional in the simulation, users choose what to say to the virtual patient, how to respond to their hesitations, resistance, and misconceptions, and how to use motivational interviewing techniques to motivate them to change their behavior.


Supported Organization:


HealthySim’s Favorite New Products from #IMSH2017

sym eyes healthcare simulator video eyes

This has been an amazing week for healthcare simulation with a huge number of new products proudly displayed at the 2017 International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare. Over the next few months we will start posting in-depth video interviews with vendors from across the floor — but for now we wanted to share the most awesome new product highlights that blew us away!

  • CAE Healthcare Sets new bar for high-fidelity simulator eyes: Sym Eyes are LCD screen eyes that react to movement in front of them AND light. Each pupil can be set to act independently as well, to demonstrate head injuries. They will be standard in new Maternal Birthing simulators and are estimated to last 5 years.
  • Laerdal Begins Campaign to Save Every Life with donations to NPSF:  Laerdal’s Every Life campaign acknowledges lives lost or harmed due to preventable medical error and strives to connect all of us to the common goal of improving patient safety. Please join them in raising awareness about this important cause!
  • EMS SimulationIQ Launches “Phone Video Capture” Capability: Imagine a world where you could simply your simulation program could use your smart phones to capture video content for your events? That world is coming thanks to SimulationIQ’s Training In Motion systems — details coming soon.
  • Gaumard Unveils Super Tory — Simulation’s first “moving” ManikinWeighing only 8lbs and completely wireless, Gaumard set the new bar for infant simulation with Super Tory S2200 explaining that “every visual assessment provides a wealth of health information. That’s why Super Tory features lifelike limb and facial movements and programmable skin coloration that can simulate the range of visual cues seen in ill and healthy newborns.”
  • iSimulate Improves Reality of Mobile Simulation Systems and Creates Realti: iSimulate, a company always on the edge of cutting edge innovations in medical simulation has updated their iPad based vital sign systems with realistic looking monitor designs, starting with ZOLL. They have also enabled programs to use iPads for real-time video capture and debriefing via Apple products. Their partner MDT also unveiled a new infant fidelity manikin prototype that was extremely realistic and had puppet like mouth controls.
  • SIMCharacters launches Paul, The World’s First High Emotion Simulator: (Note: The author of this article is currently consulting for SIMChracters). Paul was overwhelmingly praised as an extremely realistic preterm infant simulator aged at 27 weeks with a 3D printed airway based off real MRI scans of premature babies. Their facebook video went viral during the event crossing 4,000,000 views!
  • Medical-X Shows Us What Full Range of Manikin Motion Really Means: Medical-X, creators of the Nena showed the IMSH trade show floor what “real motion” meant with the latest of Adam-X, a full bodied adult manikin built on an actual bone metal skeleton, allowing for dynamic range of patient motion that is unmatched in the industry.
  • Simulab Launches PacerMan for Immersive Transvenous Pacing Training: A very large crowd gathered around the Simulab booth for a demonstration of the PacerMan system from Simulab, who know produce the only trainer for the effective training of Immersive Transvenous Pacing. The system comes with a computer interface system for educators to make specific training outcomes and real-time learner performance.

This is by far not a comprehensive list of the trade show floor but a quick recap of the amazing video interviews coming soon to HealthySimulation.com for those of you unable to attend or see it all!

Join our newsletter to ensure you get future emails regarding these video updates and more!

Actors Play Patients to Train Medical Students for Real-Life Work

Actors play patients to train medical students for real-life work

 

More great simulation news from Singapore this week, with an article highlighting the use of Standardized Patients to help medical students learn. Read last week’s article about the new partnership between SingHealth and the SCDF for paramedic simulation training.

Excerpt from StraitTimes:

Medical schools are turning to part-time actors to help students polish their bedside manners, long before they reach a real patient’s bedside. The actors take part in elaborate role plays, simulating patients to help mimic the challenges of hospital work. This could mean playing a distraught family member, a patient who cannot speak English or a senior doctor.

“I’m driven very much by the fact that it gives me a chance to help put the doctors’ hearts into medicine,” said Mr Davin Boo, who used to be a bit-part actor and is now self- employed.

The 48-year-old has been part of the National University of Singapore (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine’s programme for the past three years.

Even with acting experience, he said that working as a simulated patient can be challenging as it requires improvisation. I’ve been lectured by doctors or felt judged, or just treated as a figure in a ward. It’s wonderfully satisfying to be able to help change that. DAPHNE ONG, a professional actress, on what she hopes to achieve by working as a simulated patient. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As a simulated patient, you may be able to pre- empt responses, but it’s not a fixed script on the other end.”

Retired teacher Eugene Eu, 58, said that he likes the ability to interact with young people and – a personal bonus – understand what his daughter has to deal with. “My daughter has just started doing her nursing diploma and, with this experience that I have, I’m able to empathise with her,” he said. “We have this thing in common.”

NUS has around 160 such actors, while the new Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has around 100. Associate Professor May Lim, who is programme director for occupational therapy at SIT, said: “We decided it’s very important for students to learn from the people they will be treating, through interaction in the community and beyond a clinical setting.”

News Agency Covers the Leadership Behind the Healthcare Simulation Success Story

J. Cedar Wang, MSN, RN, GNP-BC, CHSE

NorthJersey.com recently did a profile of  J. Cedar Wang, director of simulation education at Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck. HealthySim really appreciates that this news agency did a piece sharing the professional career of a healthcare simulation champion — which helps to get the word out about the progress and power of simulation to the general community! Usually such news articles focus on the center and the equipment of simulation — so we thought this was a different and much needed angle on the people who make healthcare simulation work!

NorthJersey Excerpt:

J. Cedar Wang oversees the only hospital-based health care simulation training center in north Jersey. The Institute for Simulation Learning “seeks to train anyone along the continuum of care, including physicians, nurses, social workers, first responders, even the front desk staff,” she says. Essentially, simulation learning is the process of recreating real-life medical scenarios for training purposes. It has long been used the by the military and aeronautics industries, but it’s increasingly being tapped by health care professionals who see the life-saving potential of training in a hands-on, high-pressure environment that mirrors typical and extreme emergency situations.

“We’ve come to realize that we can do better,” she says, referencing the opportunity to “improve both the collective medical response to an emergency situation and the patient experience through compassionate communication and other soft skills.”

Since the institute opened in 2013, Wang and her team have trained more than 5,000 people, averaging 400 “learner encounters” a month, in areas ranging from cardiac arrest to dementia sensitivity training. In Wang, Holy Name could hardly have found a better person for the job. A highly trained advanced practice nurse, gifted communicator and passionate educator, she possesses such a unique skill set that she easily balances simulation training with other duties ranging from grant writing and fundraising to marketing and, incredibly, construction management.

In 2016, Wang oversaw a 4,800-square-foot expansion of the simulation program, which was made possible by a $5 million grant from the Russell Berrie Foundation. The facility now features new simulated settings, including an apartment and a doctor’s office, as well as additional patient care rooms and a dual-purpose room that can be staged as an operating room or emergency room. “From cardiac arrest to seizures and childbirth, we are able to simulate every type of situation,” says Wang, explaining the crises her team of six full-team staff members (and their high-fidelity simulators) are capable of portraying.

National Youth Leadership Forum Introduces Students to Medicine Through Simulation

National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine Features Stanford-Developed Simulation

Shouldn’t all perspective students of healthcare careers experience the role through simulation? Imagine a future where students could experience the role of healthcare provider with a simulated clinical learning experience, or putting on a VR headset to see what its like to be a firefighter, nurse, or surgeon? NYLF is paving the way this year!

Students attending Envision’s summer 2017 National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine will have the unique opportunity to get hands-on experience in an emergency medical simulation, When Care is Hours Away. This dynamic workshop gives high school students an immersive experience to gain invaluable, real-life medical skills that are critical success in a future career and beyond.

The simulation was created in collaboration with wilderness medicine expert Dr. Paul Auerbach and simulation expert Dr. Rebecca Smith-Coggins, professors in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. NYLF Medicine students will learn first-hand how to care for a patient in an emergency using only the materials at hand, employing time-tested techniques that are used around the world.

“We’re proud to have some of the most well-regarded and prominent leaders, educators, and physicians in the medical community provide support to and directly participate in NYLF Medicine, speaking to student groups and designing exciting curriculum modules like this simulation,” says Andrew Potter, Chief Academic Officer at Envision. “Not all emergencies take place in hospitals, so it is crucial for students to have skills in spine precautions, tying a tourniquet, hypothermia prevention, and more.”

Held in nine U.S. cities, NYLF Medicine represents an opportunity for aspiring doctors and medical professionals to get hands-on experience and valuable insight from health care professionals that will help them succeed in their future medical studies and careers. Program attendees visit a state-of-the-art medical simulation center to train like professionals in a variety of medical procedures and technologies with guidance from experts.

Canadian Simulationists Breathe Life Into Training Manikins

Simulationists breathe life into training manikins

The press coverage of healthcare simulation continues to catch the public’s attention at facilities across the world! Recently this awesome article covered the work of Canadian-based Fanshawe College nursing simulations, and the connection to Ontario’s SIM-One group:

Fanshawe nursing students work with a simulator to hook up a colonoscopy bag. Christine Link sits inside a small room with two-way glass, watching a young woman in the classroom beyond. The nursing student seems unsure what to do with an elderly male patient in the bed in front of her. She lingers by the supply cart, as if looking for something. Link speaks through a microphone, which comes out of the manikin as a scratchy, old-man’s voice. She is playing the role of George, a grumpy senior with a respiratory condition. “Get me a drink of water,” commands Link. George has dirty tissues filled with fake mucus scattered around him. As the student fetches a cup, Link explains that she is waiting for the perfect teaching moment. “I would have the student hold it up to my mouth, and that’s when I’d cough.”

Link is one of a growing number of simulation experts working in medical, paramedic and nursing programs across the country. “Health care has really come a long way in how we teach and present material,” she says. “No longer are we injecting into an orange.” Link, who graduated from the practical nursing program at Fanshawe College in 2007, returned to the Ontario school as a part-time lab technician the following year. After stints as an instructor, in 2013 she became the simulation technologist, now responsible for running 15 manikins.

At SIM-one in Toronto, a non-profit, national networking, training and R&D organization with 1,700 members involved in health-care simulation, CEO Timothy Willett says every college and university in the country has adopted the technique. In Ontario alone, 78 different programs and labs are using a total of 1,236 manikins and thousands more simulation tools.

SIM-one offers several online and in-person courses, including the brand-new 12-week Simulation Scenario Writing, Roleplay Theatre and Simulation Wizardry. They also train experienced simulationists to run their own courses, and each year about 15 to 20 are certified as simulation educators after they have completed three courses at a total cost of about $2,000. “As far as I know, there’s no kind of college programs you can go to with the intent of getting into that role,” says Willett.

Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond Books and Train in New $1M Healthcare Simulation Center

Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond the Books, Train in Simulation CenterAnother article showcasing how the media can cover your simulation program! Read our tutorial on how to gather such public attention for your simulation program here!

Nursing students at the Hibbing Community College (HCC) are stepping out of the classroom, into a realistic hospital room setting and learning how to treat patients in life and death situations. The newly remodeled HCC Healthcare Simulation Center opened this semester and is transforming the way students train. The state-of-the art simulation allows the students to go beyond the book and gain real-life experience that comes without the risk of working on real people.

“Students can come in and practice clinical with patients from birth all the way up to death, and they can do it in a safe environment,” explained Sandy Gustafson, nursing program director at HCC. “They can actually do the hands-on care in critical or unusual situations that they wouldn’t get in a facility that’s in a rural area.” The mannequins talk, breath, blink, cough, puke and bleed like a real human would. One of the female robots even gives birth.

“We can assess them in a way that’s different than just learning from a book because we’re just pretending there,” said Brandy Mass, a first-year nursing student. “If you don’t have that experience behind you with the simulation, then you risk the chance of freezing or not knowing what to do or drawing a blank,” said Ashton Martin, a first-year nursing student. “This prevents us from feeling that nervousness.”

3D Digital Continuity is the Future of Healthcare Education

3-D Digital Continuity Is the Future of Human Health

Sim champions it won’t be long before the entire healthcare industry is surronded by 3D Animation! We already know that designing and testing devices using 3D physical simulation is a key part of developing a commercial product. Slowly we are convincing the world that simulating and testing healthcare providers will become a key part of developing a more effictive healthcare system. Imagine watching in real-time, the human patient’s case as it developed — in 3D on the wall during diagnosis. With faster computers like IBM’s Watson — its only a matter of time! Check out the use of animation from a recent Medical Device Summit:

Steve Levine reports on The Living Heart Project which enables realistic simulation. At a time when the industry is facing some of its toughest challenges, more than 200 regulators, engineers, and healthcare leaders came together in Chicago at the American Medical Device (AMD) Summit in October, to discuss the state of the medical device industry and focus on opportunities to accelerate innovation, with increased predictability and profitability. From a regulatory, patient and payer perspective, medical device business models are changing, creating an environment that has rendered sustainable innovation elusive for many medical device companies seeking to grow their top line as well as bottom line.

These shifts in the marketplace are pressuring the balancing act between corporate efficiency, time to market, and predictable patient outcomes. It has raised an essential question for the future of the medical device industry—how to restructure to remain competitive and compliant while simultaneously meeting the needs of the patient, provider, and enterprise? The healthcare industry is finding answers in an unlikely place, by turning to a resource traditionally associated with more traditional manufacturing industries such as automotive and aerospace.