Cardionics IMSH 2017 Trade Show Floor Video Interview – New SAM3 & SimShirt!

cardionics simshirt

At IMSH 2017 HealthySimulation.com was on hand to interview the team from Cardionics about some of the awesome new products they launched at the show, including SAM 3 and the SimShirt. Stay tuned for more great IMSH video interview coverage!



SAM, the Student Auscultation Manikin 3rd Generation is an innovation in teaching and learning heart, lung, and bowel sounds. SAM’s brand new computer software interface includes Case Videos, a Real Sound Library, Echo Cardiogram Videos, and ECG Waveform for heart sounds.

The SimShirt is a garment worn by a Standardized Patient (SP) for simulating physiological conditions to test students and examine their diagnostic and procedural skills. SimShirt provides a second choice to wearing the RFID sensor tags required by the SimScope. Instead of wearing individual RFID sensor tags adhered to bare skin, the tags are integrated inside the SimShirt.  The SimShirt system has multiple uses in simulation. It can be worn by a Standardized Patient or also by a high-fidelity manikin. You can program the SimScope to play desired sounds from our vast sound library which is already embedded in the SimScope tablet. Once the standardized patient wears the SimShirt, the SimScope will read the RFID sensor tags placed within the SimShirt and your students will hear the programmed sounds of your choice through the scope. You can put the SimShirt on a low-fidelty manikin too to help increase simulation realism!

Learn more about the SAM3, SimShirt and Other New Products on the Cardionics Website!


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Final Deadline for SimGHOSTS USA Abstract Submission is TODAY by 12PM Pacific!

simghosts hourglass

Today is the day to submit your abstracts for SimGHOSTS USA 2017!
Accepted presentations provide a $50 discount for lead presenter’s registration!

Share your ideas and projects with the community, connect with others, and plan future collaboration by presenting at SimGHOSTS 2017 USA!  The due date to submit your proposal is TODAY BY 12pm PST!

Submit Your SG17USA Proposal here!

We are now accepting proposals in the following categories for SG17USA:

  • Podium Presentations (lecture with powerpoint)
  • Workshops (hands-on activity, 2 to 4 hours long)
  • Poster Presentations (“Science Fair” type of explanation of project, program, research, etc)
  • DIY Contest Entry (live demonstration or online video of a technology hack, unique design or other project)
  • Hackathon Workshop (A 4hr workshop to ‘hack’ a new product, service, or project that could better support the simulation industry)

Accepted Podium Presentations earn one (1) $50 registration discount for one of the presenters. Accepted Workshops earn $50 registration discount for up to three (3) presenters. Accepted DIY & Poster proposals will be eligible for competition in the DIY Contest and Poster Exhibition. For both types of proposals, we will be selecting a Best In Show judged by SimGHOSTS representatives, as well as a Community Award voted on by event attendees. Prizes will be distributed during the Awards Ceremony.

SimGHOSTS Topic Categories are:

  • Audiovisual Technology
  • Information Technology Management
  • Administration Medical/Clinical Topics
  • Moulage
  • Simulation Technology
  • Professional Development
  • Educational practices

SG17USA Event info:

Location: WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning
Raleigh, North Carolina
Pre-Symposium: August 1st, 2017
Symposium: August 2nd-4th, 2017

Learn more about the SimGHOSTS 2017 USA Event HERE!

New Debrief 2 Learn Podcast: Circular Questions in Debriefing

healthcare simulation debriefing podcast

Our friends at Debrief 2 Learn have produced another awesome podcast, this time covering circular questions in debriefing! Debrief2Learn aims to improve healthcare outcomes by fostering effective feedback and debriefing practices.

About this Podcast

Walter Eppich and Michaela Kolbe talk about the use of circular questions in debriefing healthcare teams. As a psychologist and family therapist, Michaela used circular questions to promote perspective taking and reflection about family interactions. In this podcast, Michaela explains how she adapted this approach for healthcare debriefing and provides multiple examples. She also discusses an article she and her team wrote entitled: How to debrief teamwork interactions: using circular questions to explore and change team interaction patterns!

About Michaela

Michaela Kolbe, PhD is a psychologist and the Director of the Simulation Center of the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. She uses simulation for training clinicians and for her research in education, psychology and organizational behavior. She publishes widely in psychological, healthcare, and simulation journals and books and is a member of several editorial boards.

About Walter

Walter Eppich practices pediatric emergency medicine at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. He teaches about simulation, faculty development, and debriefing around the world. A candidate for a PhD in Medical Education at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, Walter studies the role of talk as a medium of learning for individuals and teams. He is a co-founder of Debrief2Learn.

Listen to the podcast on Debrief 2 Learn here!


Supported Organization:


iSimulate Sponsors Award of 2017 Recipient of Street Medicine Society Award

JEMS and PennWell Corporation Announce the 2017 Recipient of John P. Pryor, MD/ Street Medicine Society Award

Last week Jeremy T. Cushman, MD, MS, EMT-P, was awarded the 2017 John P. Pryor, MD/Street Medicine Society Award at the EMS Today conference in Salt Lake City, UT which was sponsored by iSimulate. ohn P. Pryor, MD, FACS, an EMS physician, was killed on Dec. 25, 2008, while serving in Iraq. Dr. Pryor posthumously received the first award in his name at the 2009 EMS Today Conference. Each year the SMS awards a physician who has come up through the ranks as an EMS provider and constantly demonstrates a sincere and ongoing dedication to the betterment of EMS through clinical excellence or educational, logistical and/or humanitarian initiatives.

The award, sponsored by iSimulate, recognizes Dr. Cushman’s exemplary service to the field of emergency medicine and, specifically, emergency medical services (EMS). In 2006 Dr. Cushman became the medical director for the Gates Fire District in New York. Today he represents almost 30 fire and 10 ambulance agencies in a county with a population of 750,000 people. JEMS (Journal of Emergency Medical Services) seeks to improve patient care in the prehospital setting and promote positive change in EMS by delivering information and education from industry leaders, change makers and emerging voices. Dr. Cushman has been instrumental in developing, coordinating and implementing many programs and policies for his agencies over the last 10 years, including:

  • First responder naloxone procedure and delivery;
  • The Check & Inject New York project, which has saved millions of dollars across the state by having EMS use syringes to deliver epinephrine;
  • A county-wide firefighter rehabilitation and safety program; and
  • A program for influenza and Ebola preparedness that allows for an appropriate response without exposing responders to unnecessary risk.

Additionally, Dr. Cushman revised the Gates Fire Districts’ Quality Assurance and Quality Inspection program for patient care reports, creating a real-time process that provides valuable education to EMTs and assisted the 9-1-1 center with the emergency medical dispatch coding program to ensure responses optimize patient outcome.

Founded in July 1995, the mission of the Street Medicine Society (SMS) is to provide an informal forum for the growing group of physicians who got their start as EMS professionals, providing inspiration and expertise for the industry and to serve as advocates and mentors for the modern EMS professional.

ABOUT iSimulate
iSimulate uses the best of current mobile technology to create products that are more advanced, simpler to use, and more cost effective than traditional medical simulation solutions. iSimulate recently launched some of our favorite new products from IMSH 2017 which you can learn more about here! Learn more about iSimulate here.

7 Pasos para Lograr un Crecimiento Récord en su Programa de Simulación Medica: Parte 1

growing a simulation program

This is a Spanish translation of our article 7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 1 transcribed by Alfred de Jesús Toledo de Lima Director del Centro de Simulación COSMOS en Universidad Nacional Pedro Henríquez Ureña! Thanks Alfred!

Este mes hemos estado cubriendo consideraciones clave de negocios que su personal de simulación necesita tener en cuenta para construir o expandir el programa. Los artículos anteriores en esta serie incluyen el “Lenguaje de las ventas – cómo aumentar su presupuesto para simulación” y “3 recursos dominantes para ampliar su programa de simulación”.

En el artículo de hoy comparto cómo, siendo Director del Centro de Simulación Clínica de Las Vegas, pude obtener $ 250,000 USD en contratos de negocios externos en sólo dos años. Estos fondos adicionales ayudaron al centro a contratar personal adicional y a comprar nuevos equipos. Por lo tanto, tenga en cuenta que aunque este artículo se centra en los contratos externos, centrarse en los materiales presentados aquí también le ayudará a ampliar sus servicios de simulación hasta en los departamentos internos dentro de su institución.

La discusión se centra en 7 áreas clave necesarias para crear un embudo de ventas exitoso para sus servicios de simulación, los primeros 3 de los cuales cubriremos hoy:

  1. Obtención de apoyo
  2. Construir un programa
  3. Aprovechar oportunidades
  4. Mercadearse usted mismo
  5. Proporcionar servicios de calidad
  6. Obtención de retroalimentación
  7. Perfeccionamiento de los sistemas
  1. Obtencion de apoyo

Antes de que yo empezara a construir un programa de simulación externo, sabía que tendría que obtener el apoyo del liderazgo ejecutivo de nuestro departamento para dedicar tiempo y energía concentrándome en clientes fuera de nuestros grupos de interés internos. En el CSCLV este liderazgo eran los Decanos de las escuelas colaborativas compartiendo el espacio (todos los cuales estaban bajo el techo del Sistema de Educación Superior de Nevada UNLV, NSC y UNSOM).

Después de nuestro primer año de utilización, pude demostrar a los decanos que los espacios de nuestro centro no estaban siendo utilizados durante muchas noches y fines de semana. Esto fue seguido por el recordatorio de la oportunidad de “alquilar” esos espacios a grupos que podrían estar interesados en capacitar a sus estudiantes de atencion medica o estar en un centro que se vea como de atención médica pero sin pacientes reales. Los decanos acordaron que una exploración del desarrollo de negocios externos podría ayudar a cubrir los costos no sólo del tiempo de trabajo necesario para manejar esos compromisos, sino tambien el tiempo de trabajo adicional para ayudar a nuestros propios programas y también para pagar por nuevos equipos en el futuro cuando fuera necesario.

Los decanos me recordaron que tendría que obtener permiso para una cuenta especial del sistema estatal para obtener ingresos, y que tendría que generar una plantilla de contrato para los usuarios externos para proteger el centro – una que exigiera a los programas externos una prueba de estar asegurados para cubrir cualquier accidente. Después de esto me reuní con el soporte legal del Centro de la UNLV para tratar todas estas preocupaciones con el fin de obtener la aprobación final en el inicio de un programa externo.

  1. Construir un programa

Lo más importante a recordar al iniciar el desarrollo de un nuevo programa de simulación, interno o externo, es comenzar en pequeño. Al crear un programa exitoso que sea manejable y repetible, su equipo puede “enjuagar y repetir” en modo automatico mientras reserva energías de desarrollo para proyectos más grandes. Recuerde que el personal se fatiga con información nueva, nuevos procesos, nuevas tecnologías y nuevos sistemas. Al apuntar demasiado alto al principio, nos arriesgamos a agotarnos nosotros mismos y nuestros programas. Con un programa más pequeño, podemos estar seguros de no extender nuestros recursos demasiado rápido y agotarlos. Recuerde, el objetivo es el éxito a largo plazo del programa – y pasos más pequeños nos ayudarán a construir sobre nuestros logros y, en última instancia, avanzar más lejos, más rápido.

Esta mentalidad ayudó a nuestro equipo a escoger nuestro primer cliente externo, el curso de ATLS del Hospital del Condado que quedaba junto a nosotros. El grupo estaba buscando un nuevo anfitrión que les proporcionara el espacio para el entrenamiento, y para almacenar los materiales necesarios para los cursos. Sus educadores proporcionarian el entrenamiento, y el mercadeo local. Nuestro personal almacenaría su equipo, les proporcionaría espacio, proporcionaría mercadeo adicional y aseguraría una pequeña tarifa por nuestro trabajo.

Este reducido programa de 2 días permitió a nuestro equipo trabajar con cientos de situaciones que surgieron sin sobrecargar nuestro horario de trabajo de “8 a 5” dedicado a los usuarios internos de nuestro programa de simulación. Puntos como catering, recolección de pagos, horarios, contratos y preocupaciones de seguridad fueron abordados durante los 2 meses previos al primer evento. ¡Cómo resolveriamos con el aparcamiento y direcciones al salon mismo tambien necesitaba ser considerado! Las ganancias de este programa fueron pequeñas, apenas unos $ 1500 USD por evento de fin de semana.

Evidentemente aprendimos muchas cosas del primer programa en el Centro que luego incorporamos en eventos futuros (más sobre esto luego). Lo importante a destacar aquí es que después de este curso ahora podríamos manejar programas más grandes, más largos y más caros para clientes externos. Después de esto, lanzamos cursos de capacitación basados en simulación en colaboración con un consultor externo que duraron entre 4-5 días y requirieron mucho más apoyo por parte de nuestro personal en cuanto a experiencias de simulación, marketing y administración. Los beneficios de estos eventos aumentaron a unos $ 6.000 USD por evento.

Después de completar con éxito varios de estos entrenamientos, estábamos listos para programas de varias semanas con hospitales locales y escuelas privadas que terminaron generando $ 50,000 USD + contratos. Si hubiéramos empezado desde la nada a este alto nivel de servicio, estoy seguro de que no habríamos podido proporcionar programas de alta calidad los cuales son necesarios para asegurar relaciones de apoyo a largo plazo y testimonios positivos, mientras minimizamos los niveles de estrés del personal.

  1. Aprovechar oportunidades

Considere ¿Que hace que su programa de simulación sea especial? ¿Qué servicios puede proporcionar su equipo, centro, programa que los interesados internos o clientes externos pueden necesitar? Piense en pequeño y piense en grande: ¿qué grupos locales podrían beneficiarse de los contratos de capacitación permanente a largo plazo y qué grupos internacionales visitarían su centro para programas de capacitación especializada? ¿A qué equipo poco común tiene acceso su programa actualmente? ¿Está usted ubicado en un destino de viaje?

El CSCLV está ubicado en Las Vegas, lo que significa que puede atraer a personas de todo el mundo que estén interesadas en obtener Certificados de Educacion Continua mientras viajan a una ubicación divertida. ¿Qué oportunidades únicas ofrece su equipo, facultad, programa y ciudad a los clientes potenciales?

Otro beneficio de Las Vegas es su proximidad a Hollywood, que ayudó a Nuestro Centro De Simulación A Tener Su Día Más Rentable De La Historia. Las compañías de producción pagarán mucho dinero para alquilar instalaciones que parezcan localidades clínicas pero que no tengan pacientes reales de los que preocuparse.

Saber lo que puede ofrecer a los clientes locales, regionales, nacionales e internacionales le permitirá identificar y construir programas que hablarán y atraerán nuevos negocios a su programa.

¿Está interesado en una inmersión más profunda en estos temas?

¡Eche un vistazo a las 8 sesiones grabadas del evento HealthySimAdmin de forma gratuita después de inscribirse en el boletín mensual de HealthySim!

* Actualización: La segunda parte de esta serie de artículos ya está disponible, la cual nos proporciona 4 ideas más necesarias para hacer crecer su programa de simulación: ¡Marketing, entrega, retroalimentación y crecimiento!

Basic Simulation Specialist Training from Jump Simulation in Chicago March 31st

jump simulation workshop chicago

The always innovative Jump Simulation center has partnered with Chicago-based healthcare startup incubator MATTER to offer a 1-day “intro to healthcare simulation operations”. Jump Trading Simulation Center in Peoria IL was the 2016 host of the SimGHOSTS USA conference and is creating additional opportunities for regional healthcare programs to better learn how to operate simulation based technologies.

Date & Time: Friday, March 31st 8am-4pm
Location: MATTER (Healthcare Startup Incubator) in Chicago, IL
Cost: $395.00
Capacity: 15
Instructor: Kristi Sanders

Jump Simulation’s one-day course is an introduction to healthcare simulation from an operational standpoint. The training program is designed to provide hands on learning to plan, prepare, and execute a simulation event. Topics for the course include:

  • Simulation center technology
  • Simulation terminology
  • Supporting faculty and courses
  • Calendar management
  • Basic Laerdal manikin assembly
  • Basic Laerdal manikin troubleshooting
  • Running the Simulation
  • And activities required post simulation

What is MATTER?

MATTER is a community of healthcare innovators, an incubator of ideas, and a catalyst for change. We are boots-on-the-ground entrepreneurs pushing against the status quo and established institutions dedicated to improving patients’ lives. At MATTER we are all hungry for change, and we’re working together to solve real and complex healthcare problems.

About Jump

Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center (Jump) is an incubator where collaboration and innovation lead the transformation of health care worldwide. Jump programs and objectives are key to improving the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of care for community members across the region. A collaboration between OSF HealthCare and University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria (UICOMP), Jump advances the Missions of both organizations.

Register for this workshop here!

Royal College of Emergency Medicine Provides Safety Toolkit Including Simulation Resource Links

royal college patient safety toolkit healthcare simulation

Published in 2013 this Royal College of Emergency Medicine toolkit, prepared by the Safer Care Committee, is a useful starting point in providing the quality of patient care through the lens of patient safety which includes sections of the utilization of simulation.

What is the Toolkit?

This safety tool kit aims to describe the structures, processes and skills required for a ‘safe’ department. The original concept was that it would enable any Emergency Physician, starting from scratch, to construct a safety framework that contained all the key elements necessary to support the delivery of high quality care whilst at the same time being vigilant to ongoing risks. We acknowledge that in reality the majority of Emergency Departments will already have well established structures for ensuring safe care but it is also probable that not all elements are as effective as they should be; so we hope this toolkit will provide something useful for all.

Ruth Brown explains how to use the safety toolkit

This toolkit is provided to Fellows as a comprehensive (but not exhaustive) resource for delivering safe care. We know many departments already have really good systems in place, whilst others are still developing them. It is also provided as a resource for senior trainees in thinking about their future role as a consultant. We suggest you could use this resource in a number of different ways:

  1. In your local departmental meetings – Ensuring that safety is considered in the meeting or by having specific safety meetings. We have included suggested agendas for such meetings in our toolkit section Departmental Activity Resources.’
  2. Working through the toolkit – You could take a section at a time, say over a year, and review the resources as a team, perhaps as a consultant CPD session or by asking an StR to present a summary. This embeds the content in everyone’s psyche and lends an importance to it.
  3. By discussing key topics with your managers and ensuring that all business plans and service developments are prepared using the toolkit as a resource for your document.
  4. Modeling your in –house education using the resources or accessing your Trust quality and safety team to deliver the education with you – they can add a dimension to the clinical content by talking about real cases from a risk perspective.
  5. One of the key chapters is Supporting the Second Victim. This is a relatively new concept and is particularly welcomed by staff. This might be the first section of the toolkit you review together as it will engage staff very early on.

Read the full resource with links here

American Academy of Pediatrics & Kognito Launch Simulation System to Train Pediatricians

kognito simulation

The American Academy of Pediatrics and Kognito recently announced the launch of Artificial Perfection: Talking to Teens about Performance Enhancement – a free, role-play simulation designed to prepare pediatricians and other child health professionals to lead real-life conversation with teens about appearance and performance-enhancing substances.

About Kognito

Kognito is a healthcare simulation company that believes in the power of conversation to inspire and inform, impact how people think and act, evoke empathy, and change lives. We are pioneers in developing research-proven, role-play simulations that prepare individuals to lead real-life conversations. We build and assess their confidence and competency by providing them the ability to practice conversations with our growing family of emotionally-responsive virtual people. Our innovative approach uses the science of learning, the art of conversation and the power of game technology to measurably improve social, emotional, and physical health. Leading health, education, government, and non-profit organizations use our growing portfolio of simulations. Kognito is the only company with health simulations listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP).

Press Release Excerpt:

The use of appearance and performance-enhancing substances among youth has increased tremendously over the past decade. More than 10 percent of adolescents have misused prescription stimulants for cognitive enhancement, and about 6 percent of the general high school population has used illegal steroids for appearance or strength enhancement. Physicians should be aware of the use of performance-enhancing substances by pediatric patients; be prepared to identify risk factors, signs, and symptoms; ask screening questions; and offer anticipatory guidance related to their use.

This innovative simulation engages users in role-play conversations with three virtual and emotionally responsive patients presenting with signs of appearance and performance-enhancing substances. As the health professional in the simulation, users choose what to say to the virtual patient, how to respond to their hesitations, resistance, and misconceptions, and how to use motivational interviewing techniques to motivate them to change their behavior.

HealthySim’s Favorite New Products from #IMSH2017

sym eyes healthcare simulator video eyes

This has been an amazing week for healthcare simulation with a huge number of new products proudly displayed at the 2017 International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare. Over the next few months we will start posting in-depth video interviews with vendors from across the floor — but for now we wanted to share the most awesome new product highlights that blew us away!

  • CAE Healthcare Sets new bar for high-fidelity simulator eyes: Sym Eyes are LCD screen eyes that react to movement in front of them AND light. Each pupil can be set to act independently as well, to demonstrate head injuries. They will be standard in new Maternal Birthing simulators and are estimated to last 5 years.
  • Laerdal Begins Campaign to Save Every Life with donations to NPSF:  Laerdal’s Every Life campaign acknowledges lives lost or harmed due to preventable medical error and strives to connect all of us to the common goal of improving patient safety. Please join them in raising awareness about this important cause!
  • EMS SimulationIQ Launches “Phone Video Capture” Capability: Imagine a world where you could simply your simulation program could use your smart phones to capture video content for your events? That world is coming thanks to SimulationIQ’s Training In Motion systems — details coming soon.
  • Gaumard Unveils Super Tory — Simulation’s first “moving” ManikinWeighing only 8lbs and completely wireless, Gaumard set the new bar for infant simulation with Super Tory S2200 explaining that “every visual assessment provides a wealth of health information. That’s why Super Tory features lifelike limb and facial movements and programmable skin coloration that can simulate the range of visual cues seen in ill and healthy newborns.”
  • iSimulate Improves Reality of Mobile Simulation Systems and Creates Realti: iSimulate, a company always on the edge of cutting edge innovations in medical simulation has updated their iPad based vital sign systems with realistic looking monitor designs, starting with ZOLL. They have also enabled programs to use iPads for real-time video capture and debriefing via Apple products. Their partner MDT also unveiled a new infant fidelity manikin prototype that was extremely realistic and had puppet like mouth controls.
  • SIMCharacters launches Paul, The World’s First High Emotion Simulator: (Note: The author of this article is currently consulting for SIMChracters). Paul was overwhelmingly praised as an extremely realistic preterm infant simulator aged at 27 weeks with a 3D printed airway based off real MRI scans of premature babies. Their facebook video went viral during the event crossing 4,000,000 views!
  • Medical-X Shows Us What Full Range of Manikin Motion Really Means: Medical-X, creators of the Nena showed the IMSH trade show floor what “real motion” meant with the latest of Adam-X, a full bodied adult manikin built on an actual bone metal skeleton, allowing for dynamic range of patient motion that is unmatched in the industry.
  • Simulab Launches PacerMan for Immersive Transvenous Pacing Training: A very large crowd gathered around the Simulab booth for a demonstration of the PacerMan system from Simulab, who know produce the only trainer for the effective training of Immersive Transvenous Pacing. The system comes with a computer interface system for educators to make specific training outcomes and real-time learner performance.

This is by far not a comprehensive list of the trade show floor but a quick recap of the amazing video interviews coming soon to HealthySimulation.com for those of you unable to attend or see it all!

Join our newsletter to ensure you get future emails regarding these video updates and more!

Actors Play Patients to Train Medical Students for Real-Life Work

Actors play patients to train medical students for real-life work

 

More great simulation news from Singapore this week, with an article highlighting the use of Standardized Patients to help medical students learn. Read last week’s article about the new partnership between SingHealth and the SCDF for paramedic simulation training.

Excerpt from StraitTimes:

Medical schools are turning to part-time actors to help students polish their bedside manners, long before they reach a real patient’s bedside. The actors take part in elaborate role plays, simulating patients to help mimic the challenges of hospital work. This could mean playing a distraught family member, a patient who cannot speak English or a senior doctor.

“I’m driven very much by the fact that it gives me a chance to help put the doctors’ hearts into medicine,” said Mr Davin Boo, who used to be a bit-part actor and is now self- employed.

The 48-year-old has been part of the National University of Singapore (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine’s programme for the past three years.

Even with acting experience, he said that working as a simulated patient can be challenging as it requires improvisation. I’ve been lectured by doctors or felt judged, or just treated as a figure in a ward. It’s wonderfully satisfying to be able to help change that. DAPHNE ONG, a professional actress, on what she hopes to achieve by working as a simulated patient. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As a simulated patient, you may be able to pre- empt responses, but it’s not a fixed script on the other end.”

Retired teacher Eugene Eu, 58, said that he likes the ability to interact with young people and – a personal bonus – understand what his daughter has to deal with. “My daughter has just started doing her nursing diploma and, with this experience that I have, I’m able to empathise with her,” he said. “We have this thing in common.”

NUS has around 160 such actors, while the new Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has around 100. Associate Professor May Lim, who is programme director for occupational therapy at SIT, said: “We decided it’s very important for students to learn from the people they will be treating, through interaction in the community and beyond a clinical setting.”