CAE Healthcare Supports Development of Simulation Impact Tool with Leeds Beckett

Nurse academic works on tool to measure student learning

Nursing Times recently covered how CAE Healthacre is supporting the development of a tool that calculates the impact of a student’s simulated encounter with a patient with UK based Leeds Beckett University!

Ann Sunderland, director of clinical skills and simulation at Leeds Beckett University, has been selected to work with Canadian Aviation Electronics (CAE) Healthcare to develop a tool that calculates the impact of a student’s simulated encounter with a patient.

The project, Patient Impact Scoring, will build on Ms Sunderland’s PhD research, which centers around the impact of simulation-based education on patient outcomes. CAE Healthcare’s existing system in the university’s clinical skills suite is equipped with 13 cameras, including four mobile cameras, that allows educators to assess activity. Ms Sunderland will compare the effects on patient outcomes in relation to both simulation-based and scheduled learning activities in postgraduate students.



She will then work with CAE Healthcare programming experts in the US to develop a tool for calculating a score that reflects the overall impact of the student’s encounter with a patient – either a lifelike mannequin or simulated patient – during a simulated scenario.

Ms Sunderland, a nurse by background, said: “Simulation has become firmly embedded in healthcare education over the last few decades as there is overwhelming evidence to support its effectiveness. “Simulation-based education offers targeted learning experiences where knowledge, skills and attitudes can be learned and refined within a safe and supportive environment,” she noted. “The ability to replicate specific clinical scenarios with immersive and interactive participation from learners – both individuals and teams – is a powerful tool with which to enhance technical and non-technical skills, as well as being a useful method of assessment,” she said.


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National Youth Leadership Forum Introduces Students to Medicine Through Simulation

National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine Features Stanford-Developed Simulation

Shouldn’t all perspective students of healthcare careers experience the role through simulation? Imagine a future where students could experience the role of healthcare provider with a simulated clinical learning experience, or putting on a VR headset to see what its like to be a firefighter, nurse, or surgeon? NYLF is paving the way this year!

Students attending Envision’s summer 2017 National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine will have the unique opportunity to get hands-on experience in an emergency medical simulation, When Care is Hours Away. This dynamic workshop gives high school students an immersive experience to gain invaluable, real-life medical skills that are critical success in a future career and beyond.

The simulation was created in collaboration with wilderness medicine expert Dr. Paul Auerbach and simulation expert Dr. Rebecca Smith-Coggins, professors in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. NYLF Medicine students will learn first-hand how to care for a patient in an emergency using only the materials at hand, employing time-tested techniques that are used around the world.

“We’re proud to have some of the most well-regarded and prominent leaders, educators, and physicians in the medical community provide support to and directly participate in NYLF Medicine, speaking to student groups and designing exciting curriculum modules like this simulation,” says Andrew Potter, Chief Academic Officer at Envision. “Not all emergencies take place in hospitals, so it is crucial for students to have skills in spine precautions, tying a tourniquet, hypothermia prevention, and more.”

Held in nine U.S. cities, NYLF Medicine represents an opportunity for aspiring doctors and medical professionals to get hands-on experience and valuable insight from health care professionals that will help them succeed in their future medical studies and careers. Program attendees visit a state-of-the-art medical simulation center to train like professionals in a variety of medical procedures and technologies with guidance from experts.

Cincinnati’s St. Elizabeth ‘Saves Christmas’ with New Simulation Center

St. Elizabeth 'saves Christmas' with new Simulation Center

Cincinnati’s Soap Box Media recently covered the launch of a new simulation center “SIM” at the St. Elizabeth Training Education Center:

Imagine you’re a nurse in a hospital delivery room, and immediately after giving birth the mother starts hemorrhaging. It’s a situation you rarely face, maybe once in your career, but if you don’t do exactly the right thing very quickly, the mother’s life will be in peril.

How does the hospital ensure that you know what to do when there’s no time to think? How do they train you, the physician, the anesthesiologist and the facility’s blood bank staff to pull together as a team and make the correct decisions? St. Elizabeth Healthcare is counting on its new Simulation Center to make the difference.

The SIM Center officially opened in late October as a 23,000-square-foot addition to the St. Elizabeth Training and Education Center, which itself opened in June. SETEC was fashioned from a former conference center in Erlanger to centralize all of St. Elizabeth’s staff training and development functions. The SIM Center utilizes lifelike mannequins in realistic hospital rooms with state-of-the-art equipment to create real-world scenarios for staff. And these aren’t the passive mannequins you might have seen used in CPR demonstrations.

SIM Center Manager Megan Vasseur says the mannequins have heartbeats, breathing sounds and pulses everywhere we have pulses, and some even blink, sweat and cry. One female mannequin delivers a baby, complete with a reservoir of blood and bodily fluids that do their thing at the appropriate time.

“These mannequins are very realistic, which is kind of a strange experience at first if you’re not used to it,” Vasseur said. “But they provide a much higher level of experience for our staff and help them develop better skills than the old way of working on each other or on live volunteers. We focus a lot of our simulation work on low-volume, high-risk situations that don’t happen all that often, but when they do, you have to be proficient at fixing them. With these mannequins, if you make a mistake it’s not life and death — you learn from your mistakes, practice your skills and get better.”

Interested in getting such media attention to your simulation program? Read our Press Tutorial Guide here!


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Mount Sinai Unveils Medical Modeling Core: Will Provide Virtual Reality, Simulation, and 3D Printing Services

Mount Sinai Unveils Medical Modeling Core: Will Provide Virtual Reality, Simulation, and 3D Printing Services

Both 3ders.org and 3Dprint.org covered the recent launch of the Medical Modeling Core which will “provide virtual reality, simulation, and 3D printing services, with quick turnaround times, on a low-cost, fee-for-service basis.”

The wonders of 3D printing in the medical field are far-reaching. You can create better spinal care , make a wide variety of prosthetics , or even 3D print amazing, origami-inspired self-folding medical implants . New York’s Mount Sinai Health System is certainly no stranger to 3D printing : the hospital’s chief of pathology and laboratory medicine recently worked with 3D printed bone material . Yesterday, they announced the creation of their new Medical Modeling Core, where clinicians can confer and order 3D prints for their cases. Led by the Department of Neurosurgery , this collaboration will provide virtual reality, simulation, and 3D printing services, with quick turnaround times, on a low-cost, fee-for-service basis.

This resource is the first of its kind, catering to the patient-specific 3D modeling requirements for the Mount Sinai clinicians. The simulation, prototyping, and 3D printing resources developed at Mount Sinai are pretty rare for a medical institution. The 3D printed models will be used in the planning stages for minimally invasive approaches, and can also be used in a surgery trial run. They will also be invaluable during the patient consultation process. 

“We’re unique because we can leverage our technological tools with the expertise of radiology and the printing lab to complete projects on a rapid time scale,” said Dr. Costa. “We’re talking about days as opposed to weeks. Mount Sinai is a large institution with a high volume of cases and our patients will benefit from 3D modeling.”

Read the full 3Ders Article here and the 3DPrint Article here!

Brand-new Medical Simulation Centre in Canada Expected to Save Lives

Brand-new simulator centre expected to save lives

Image Credit: Kent Simmonds / CFJC Today KAMLOOPS

Happy Boxing Day Canada! CFJCToday recently reported on the launch of a new simulation center at the Royal Inland Hospital in Canada:

Through a very generous donation, two patient simulators have been given to the hospital, allowing both student nurses and doctors to practice routine and emergency exams. “We have two simulators,” said Tracy Canuel, Regional Knowledge Coordinator for Simulation. “We have one adult male and we have one pediatric simulator. They’re high-fidelity which means they’re controlled by a computer and they have heart sounds, breath sounds, they blink, can feel pulses.”

“We take this very seriously,” said Dr. Steve Reid, a Family Practice Resident at Royal Inland Hospital. “We enter the room wearing hospital scrubs so we’re already mentally prepared for it being a very real situation. The room itself looks like a very authentic, typical patient room. It really feels like the real thing.” Simulators have become commonplace in many B.C. hospitals including Vancouver General Hospital and Kelowna General Hospital.

At RIH their computer-programmed patient costs $90,000 and can simulate almost any medical situation.”We’re running intubation practices, chest-tube insertion, point-of-care ultrasound,” said Dr.Reid.Every chest compression and insertion is instantly recorded into a database where it’s later analyzed by instructors.

Integrating Scenario-Based Simulation Into Radiology Education Improves Learning Outcomes

radiology simulation research

Check out the conclusion of this Dovepress Journal Research entitled “Integrating of scenario-based simulation into radiology education to improve critical thinking skills”, which found that “the integration of scenario-based simulations in radiology education led to a positive impact on learning outcomes, formative interactive learning, and filling the gap between theory and practice. Moreover, it promoted critical thinking skills and allowed radiology professionals to demonstrate their knowledge of similar cases.”

The article was published November 7th, 2016 by authors Abuzaid MM and Elshami W from, Medical Diagnostic Imaging Department, College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

Introduction: For many years, conventional radiographic films have been used for radiology education. Nevertheless, advances in imaging modalities, image quality, and the number of images produced by various methods have seen a move toward digital formats. Certainly, a patient’s case has a significant value in medical education; it can transfer theoretical knowledge to real experiences. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of scenario-based simulations in radiology education and their impact on professional learning outcomes.

Materials and methods: Patient scenarios were collected and converted to digital teaching files, each supported by clinical history, anatomy illustration, as well as medical and radiological investigation. The scenarios were presented online to radiology professionals for 6 months. At the end of the study, the scenarios were evaluated regarding design, content, and their role in improving critical thinking.

Results: Twenty-two scenarios were published online covering various radiology areas. Two hundred and thirty-eight radiology professionals were invited, and 84% participated in the evaluation process. Each participant completed an average of 13 scenarios with an approximate time of 23 minutes for each. The majority of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the scenarios were well designed (94%), were appropriate to their level of knowledge (70%), and helped them in critical thinking and in understanding similar cases (79%).

Fort Drum Medics Train Soldiers with Modern Healthcare Simulators

fort drum simulation military training

The Tactical Combat Casualty Care Exportable kit is a combination of Army medical simulators that can be used to train the Warrior Skill Level 1 Medical Training Tasks found in the Soldier’s Manual of Common Tasks, said Jose L. Mercado, lead engineer of the Product Manager for Medical Simulators. Each brigade will receive two TC3X kits, which include full body trainers that mimic the weight and distribution of a human body, the ability to simulate breathing, bleeding, pulses and traumatic amputations.

“Soldiers who are not medics are the ones that are there when the injury occurs,” Mercado said. “They need the skills necessary to prevent these (avoidable) deaths.” A single kit is designed to allow three medics to train up to 30 Soldiers on common medical tasks, Mercado said.

Sgt. Nathanial McMahon, a Medical Simulation Training Center instructor from Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, 10th Mountain Division (LI), assures that this is vital training equipment for the modern warfighter. “They bleed. They talk. They move,” McMahon said. “This simulator will ‘die’ on you if you don’t have the right skills.”

Simulation and Interactive Learning (SaIL) Centre Seeks Simulation/Medical Education Fellow

nhs sail centre uk fellow in simulation

SAIL is seeking Simulation Fellows!

Applications are invited for appointment to a Simulation/Medical Education Fellow placement. This unique post offers an exciting opportunity for Specialty Registrars to develop their experience and skills as medical educators. The Fellowship provides an out of programme experience for a period of 12 months attached to the Simulation and Interactive Learning (SaIL) Centre within Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust.

St Thomas’ has a central London location with stunning views across the Thames to the Houses of Parliament, is next to the London Eye and the arts complex of the South Bank. There is easy access to major transport links.

The post-holder will have an educational supervisor, funding towards a relevant course, an expectation of participation in project work and encouragement and practical help to produce a poster presentation or publication. Support and training will also be given to help the post-holder develop key management skills which are important for a future Consultant role.

The Trust has a number of centrally located subsidised accommodation options. The post-holder may participate in a senior trainee rota dependent on their specialty. Applicants must hold full registration with the GMCClosing date: 23/01/2017, by midnight.

University of Nebraska & Nebraska Medicine Awarded $20 Million to Develop National Simulation Training Center

university of nebraska simulation

How would you like to receive a check for your Sim Center for $20,000,000? Well, Newswise just reported on one such awesome simulation program in Nebraska with such lucky news:

The University of Nebraska Medical Center/Nebraska Medicine have been awarded $19.8 million by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to develop a Training, Simulation and Quarantine Center to teach federal health care personnel procedures in treating highly infectious diseases and to create a place to monitor persons who have received a high-risk exposure to a highly infectious disease, such as Ebola.

“This is both a tremendous opportunity and responsibility, and I know our medical center will rise to the challenge,” said UNMC Chancellor Jeffrey P. Gold, M.D. “Given UNMC and Nebraska Medicine’s successful experience during the Ebola crisis, our state-of-the-art biocontainment unit, and the planned Interdisciplinary Experiential Center for Enduring Learning (iEXCEL), we are perfectly positioned to deliver on this project. We appreciate the support that Congressman Brad Ashford and the entire Nebraska Congressional delegation have shown for UNMC on this project.”

“UNMC is a worldwide leader in the fight against Ebola and other highly infectious diseases, and this funding will strengthen their ability to share their knowledge with the broader health care community,” said Rep. Brad Ashford, who helped lead the push for the funding in Congress. 

Canadian Simulationists Breathe Life Into Training Manikins

Simulationists breathe life into training manikins

The press coverage of healthcare simulation continues to catch the public’s attention at facilities across the world! Recently this awesome article covered the work of Canadian-based Fanshawe College nursing simulations, and the connection to Ontario’s SIM-One group:

Fanshawe nursing students work with a simulator to hook up a colonoscopy bag. Christine Link sits inside a small room with two-way glass, watching a young woman in the classroom beyond. The nursing student seems unsure what to do with an elderly male patient in the bed in front of her. She lingers by the supply cart, as if looking for something. Link speaks through a microphone, which comes out of the manikin as a scratchy, old-man’s voice. She is playing the role of George, a grumpy senior with a respiratory condition. “Get me a drink of water,” commands Link. George has dirty tissues filled with fake mucus scattered around him. As the student fetches a cup, Link explains that she is waiting for the perfect teaching moment. “I would have the student hold it up to my mouth, and that’s when I’d cough.”

Link is one of a growing number of simulation experts working in medical, paramedic and nursing programs across the country. “Health care has really come a long way in how we teach and present material,” she says. “No longer are we injecting into an orange.” Link, who graduated from the practical nursing program at Fanshawe College in 2007, returned to the Ontario school as a part-time lab technician the following year. After stints as an instructor, in 2013 she became the simulation technologist, now responsible for running 15 manikins.

At SIM-one in Toronto, a non-profit, national networking, training and R&D organization with 1,700 members involved in health-care simulation, CEO Timothy Willett says every college and university in the country has adopted the technique. In Ontario alone, 78 different programs and labs are using a total of 1,236 manikins and thousands more simulation tools.

SIM-one offers several online and in-person courses, including the brand-new 12-week Simulation Scenario Writing, Roleplay Theatre and Simulation Wizardry. They also train experienced simulationists to run their own courses, and each year about 15 to 20 are certified as simulation educators after they have completed three courses at a total cost of about $2,000. “As far as I know, there’s no kind of college programs you can go to with the intent of getting into that role,” says Willett.