University of California Irvine Seeks Emergency Medicine Simulation Fellows

medical simulation fellowship

The University of California, Irvine, Department of Emergency Medicine is seeking applicants for a Simulation Fellowship with an application period of July 1st, 2016 through June 30th, 2017

University of California, Irvine, Department of Emergency Medicine (EM) is seeking a HS Clinical Instructor- Medical Simulation Fellow for July, 2017. University of California, Irvine Medical Center is a Level I Trauma center with 5,000 runs/year, 50,000 ED census, with a nationally recognized three-year residency program since 1989. The UC Irvine Medical Education Simulation Center is a new $40 million, 65,000-square-foot facility that provides telemedicine and simulation-based educational programs and CME courses for thousands of healthcare providers each year. The four-story medical education center includes a full-scale operating room, emergency room, trauma bay, obstetrics suite and critical care unit. The simulation fellow will have the opportunity to educate/train and form cooperative collaborative relationships with medical students, residents, nurses, allied health professionals, EMTs, paramedics, and physicians while developing and delivering innovative simulation curriculum. Our simulation-based content has been implemented in educational courses at the local, regional, national and international level. The simulation fellow will have the opportunity to present at local, regional, national, and international conferences.



The Medical Simulation Fellowship is a one year mentored fellowship that offers advanced training in simulation teaching, curriculum design, educational program implementation, study design, and research for a graduate of an accredited Emergency Medicine residency program. A two-year track is available for those applicants in pursuit of an advanced degree. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and proportion of clinical effort.

Submit your CV and statement of interest on the UCI website!


Sponsored Advertisement:


American Academy of Pediatrics & Kognito Launch Simulation System to Train Pediatricians

kognito simulation

The American Academy of Pediatrics and Kognito recently announced the launch of Artificial Perfection: Talking to Teens about Performance Enhancement – a free, role-play simulation designed to prepare pediatricians and other child health professionals to lead real-life conversation with teens about appearance and performance-enhancing substances.

About Kognito

Kognito is a healthcare simulation company that believes in the power of conversation to inspire and inform, impact how people think and act, evoke empathy, and change lives. We are pioneers in developing research-proven, role-play simulations that prepare individuals to lead real-life conversations. We build and assess their confidence and competency by providing them the ability to practice conversations with our growing family of emotionally-responsive virtual people. Our innovative approach uses the science of learning, the art of conversation and the power of game technology to measurably improve social, emotional, and physical health. Leading health, education, government, and non-profit organizations use our growing portfolio of simulations. Kognito is the only company with health simulations listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP).

Press Release Excerpt:

The use of appearance and performance-enhancing substances among youth has increased tremendously over the past decade. More than 10 percent of adolescents have misused prescription stimulants for cognitive enhancement, and about 6 percent of the general high school population has used illegal steroids for appearance or strength enhancement. Physicians should be aware of the use of performance-enhancing substances by pediatric patients; be prepared to identify risk factors, signs, and symptoms; ask screening questions; and offer anticipatory guidance related to their use.

This innovative simulation engages users in role-play conversations with three virtual and emotionally responsive patients presenting with signs of appearance and performance-enhancing substances. As the health professional in the simulation, users choose what to say to the virtual patient, how to respond to their hesitations, resistance, and misconceptions, and how to use motivational interviewing techniques to motivate them to change their behavior.

Actors Play Patients to Train Medical Students for Real-Life Work

Actors play patients to train medical students for real-life work

 

More great simulation news from Singapore this week, with an article highlighting the use of Standardized Patients to help medical students learn. Read last week’s article about the new partnership between SingHealth and the SCDF for paramedic simulation training.

Excerpt from StraitTimes:

Medical schools are turning to part-time actors to help students polish their bedside manners, long before they reach a real patient’s bedside. The actors take part in elaborate role plays, simulating patients to help mimic the challenges of hospital work. This could mean playing a distraught family member, a patient who cannot speak English or a senior doctor.

“I’m driven very much by the fact that it gives me a chance to help put the doctors’ hearts into medicine,” said Mr Davin Boo, who used to be a bit-part actor and is now self- employed.

The 48-year-old has been part of the National University of Singapore (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine’s programme for the past three years.

Even with acting experience, he said that working as a simulated patient can be challenging as it requires improvisation. I’ve been lectured by doctors or felt judged, or just treated as a figure in a ward. It’s wonderfully satisfying to be able to help change that. DAPHNE ONG, a professional actress, on what she hopes to achieve by working as a simulated patient. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As a simulated patient, you may be able to pre- empt responses, but it’s not a fixed script on the other end.”

Retired teacher Eugene Eu, 58, said that he likes the ability to interact with young people and – a personal bonus – understand what his daughter has to deal with. “My daughter has just started doing her nursing diploma and, with this experience that I have, I’m able to empathise with her,” he said. “We have this thing in common.”

NUS has around 160 such actors, while the new Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has around 100. Associate Professor May Lim, who is programme director for occupational therapy at SIT, said: “We decided it’s very important for students to learn from the people they will be treating, through interaction in the community and beyond a clinical setting.”


Sponsored Advertisement:


Singapore Civil Defense Force Paramedics to Train with Simulation & Upcoming Singapore “S3” Simulation Conference

250 SCDF paramedics to hone skills in hospitals

Recently the Singapore Civil Defense Force announced that it would be partnering with SingHealth to begin training through simulation. Both the Strait Times and Channel News Asia reported about this monumental healthcare simulation partnership.

Because of the massive adoption of simulation by Singapore, SimGHOSTS has partnered with SESAM and SingHealth to offer “S3” Simulation Conference October 31st – November 3rd, 2017. Learn more about this innovative collaborative event on the SimGHOSTS website!

Strait Times Excerpt:

“SCDF paramedics will be trained to deal with simulated emergencies at SingHealth’s new medical simulation institute, which was launched yesterday to train healthcare staff. More than 250 paramedics from the Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) will serve hospital attachments over the next six years, in a move to hone the skills of emergency services here.

This is in response to the complex needs of Singapore’s ageing population – with four in 10 emergency calls in 2015 involving seniors. Older people tend to have multiple health problems, which means paramedic training must get more sophisticated, explained SCDF chief medical officer Ng Yih Yng.

“When we manage the patients today, as compared with 20 years ago, (they) no longer have one problem where you can apply a single protocol,” he said. “We need to evolve the training from just application of protocol towards critical thinking and problem-solving… How do they prioritise and which is the problem they need to solve immediately.”

Yesterday, the SCDF inked a training deal with healthcare group SingHealth at a ceremony attended by Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean. Under the agreement, 14 nurses from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) will also be seconded to the SCDF’s 995 operations centre. This builds on an earlier pilot scheme involving four nurses that showed good results, including improving survival rates, said Associate Professor Marcus Ong, director of the unit for pre-hospital emergency care at the Health Ministry.

“Last month, one of my nurses told me that she gave instructions over the phone when someone was choking on a fishball… and that person was saved,” said Prof Ong, who is also a senior consultant at SGH’s emergency medicine department. “This is a very practical example of the difference they can make.” Both parties are also working to develop a programme to train senior paramedics to teach these advanced skills, eventually establishing them as paramedic educators.”

Learn more about the S3 Singapore Simulation Conference here!

Immersive Media Initiative Uses VR to Train Healthcare Students

Immersive Media Initiative uses virtual reality to train medical students

Almost weekly now, healthcare educational programs around the world are receiving grants and other financial support to explore the use of VR in healthcare education and training. Check out this recent article from the POST and an almost $1M grant to fund such research at Ohio University:

Alexa Hoynacke, a senior studying industrial systems engineering, plays a virtual reality game that involves touching targets as a part of the LEARNING study in Grover Center on November 5, 2015. Along with entertainment, virtual reality can also be used for healthcare purposes. With new virtual reality simulations, medical students can practice procedures and gain confidence in their craft faster. Since receiving an $878,000 grant from Ohio University’s Innovation Strategy program, the Immersive Media Initiative team was able to begin work on a handful of virtual reality projects — they have tackled filmmaking and enhanced journalism, and they have also been busy with multiple VR projects in the medical field.

Last summer, the Immersive Media Initiative shot 360-degree footage of emergency room patients. This was their first project in virtual reality healthcare. Eric Williams, associate professor of media arts and studies and co-creator of Immersive Media Initiative, consulted with Dr. Thanh Nguyn since he is in charge of training six medical students every semester. Williams said, “Here’s the technology we have, how can we help you train your interns better.” Williams said virtual reality lets you “go and and watch the same trauma bay procedure and figure out how everything works.” Medical students can benefit from using virtual reality as part of their training because traditional methods do not allow for as

Since receiving an $878,000 grant from Ohio University’s Innovation Strategy program, the Immersive Media Initiative team was able to begin work on a handful of virtual reality projects — they have tackled filmmaking and enhanced journalism, and they have also been busy with multiple VR projects in the medical field.

much access to bodies. There is only a limited supply of cadavers to work on, and the E.R. can receive an unsteady stream of new patients.

“Virtual reality not only makes it to feel like a person but makes it look like a person,” Fredricks said.


Sponsored Advertisement:


GE Partners with Saudi Arabia’s Princess Nourah University to Expand Simulation Training

GE, PNU to team up in healthcare and clinical simulation at KAAUH

From the Saudi Gazette:

Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University (PNU), the largest all-female university in the world, has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MoU) with GE with two overarching goals that will see GE moving its Saudi headquarters to the PNU Academic Complex in Riyadh, and the two entities undertaking joint work in Healthcare skills development and clinical simulations at King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAAUH).

The MoUs were signed at a ceremony at PNU by Dr Ahmed Mohammed Abuabah, CEO of KAAUH; Eng. Ahmed Nasser Albedaie, CEO PNU Endowment Company; and Hisham Al Bahkali, GE President & CEO, for Saudi Arabia & Bahrain. The ceremony took place in the presence of Dr. Hoda bint Mohamed Al-Ameel, Rector of PNU; Dr Saleh Abdullah Almezel, Vice Rector of PNU; and John Rice, GE Vice Chairman, along with other senior officials of PNU, KAAUH and GE.

As per the first MoU with PNU, GE will move all its operations in Riyadh to its new Saudi headquarters in PNU Academic Complex in 2018. A new state-of-the-art office will be designed to the highest standards of sustainability to accommodate all GE operations under one roof.

News Agency Covers the Leadership Behind the Healthcare Simulation Success Story

J. Cedar Wang, MSN, RN, GNP-BC, CHSE

NorthJersey.com recently did a profile of  J. Cedar Wang, director of simulation education at Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck. HealthySim really appreciates that this news agency did a piece sharing the professional career of a healthcare simulation champion — which helps to get the word out about the progress and power of simulation to the general community! Usually such news articles focus on the center and the equipment of simulation — so we thought this was a different and much needed angle on the people who make healthcare simulation work!

NorthJersey Excerpt:

J. Cedar Wang oversees the only hospital-based health care simulation training center in north Jersey. The Institute for Simulation Learning “seeks to train anyone along the continuum of care, including physicians, nurses, social workers, first responders, even the front desk staff,” she says. Essentially, simulation learning is the process of recreating real-life medical scenarios for training purposes. It has long been used the by the military and aeronautics industries, but it’s increasingly being tapped by health care professionals who see the life-saving potential of training in a hands-on, high-pressure environment that mirrors typical and extreme emergency situations.

“We’ve come to realize that we can do better,” she says, referencing the opportunity to “improve both the collective medical response to an emergency situation and the patient experience through compassionate communication and other soft skills.”

Since the institute opened in 2013, Wang and her team have trained more than 5,000 people, averaging 400 “learner encounters” a month, in areas ranging from cardiac arrest to dementia sensitivity training. In Wang, Holy Name could hardly have found a better person for the job. A highly trained advanced practice nurse, gifted communicator and passionate educator, she possesses such a unique skill set that she easily balances simulation training with other duties ranging from grant writing and fundraising to marketing and, incredibly, construction management.

In 2016, Wang oversaw a 4,800-square-foot expansion of the simulation program, which was made possible by a $5 million grant from the Russell Berrie Foundation. The facility now features new simulated settings, including an apartment and a doctor’s office, as well as additional patient care rooms and a dual-purpose room that can be staged as an operating room or emergency room. “From cardiac arrest to seizures and childbirth, we are able to simulate every type of situation,” says Wang, explaining the crises her team of six full-team staff members (and their high-fidelity simulators) are capable of portraying.


Supported Organization:


CAE Healthcare Supports Development of Simulation Impact Tool with Leeds Beckett

Nurse academic works on tool to measure student learning

Nursing Times recently covered how CAE Healthacre is supporting the development of a tool that calculates the impact of a student’s simulated encounter with a patient with UK based Leeds Beckett University!

Ann Sunderland, director of clinical skills and simulation at Leeds Beckett University, has been selected to work with Canadian Aviation Electronics (CAE) Healthcare to develop a tool that calculates the impact of a student’s simulated encounter with a patient.

The project, Patient Impact Scoring, will build on Ms Sunderland’s PhD research, which centers around the impact of simulation-based education on patient outcomes. CAE Healthcare’s existing system in the university’s clinical skills suite is equipped with 13 cameras, including four mobile cameras, that allows educators to assess activity. Ms Sunderland will compare the effects on patient outcomes in relation to both simulation-based and scheduled learning activities in postgraduate students.

She will then work with CAE Healthcare programming experts in the US to develop a tool for calculating a score that reflects the overall impact of the student’s encounter with a patient – either a lifelike mannequin or simulated patient – during a simulated scenario.

Ms Sunderland, a nurse by background, said: “Simulation has become firmly embedded in healthcare education over the last few decades as there is overwhelming evidence to support its effectiveness. “Simulation-based education offers targeted learning experiences where knowledge, skills and attitudes can be learned and refined within a safe and supportive environment,” she noted. “The ability to replicate specific clinical scenarios with immersive and interactive participation from learners – both individuals and teams – is a powerful tool with which to enhance technical and non-technical skills, as well as being a useful method of assessment,” she said.

National Youth Leadership Forum Introduces Students to Medicine Through Simulation

National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine Features Stanford-Developed Simulation

Shouldn’t all perspective students of healthcare careers experience the role through simulation? Imagine a future where students could experience the role of healthcare provider with a simulated clinical learning experience, or putting on a VR headset to see what its like to be a firefighter, nurse, or surgeon? NYLF is paving the way this year!

Students attending Envision’s summer 2017 National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine will have the unique opportunity to get hands-on experience in an emergency medical simulation, When Care is Hours Away. This dynamic workshop gives high school students an immersive experience to gain invaluable, real-life medical skills that are critical success in a future career and beyond.

The simulation was created in collaboration with wilderness medicine expert Dr. Paul Auerbach and simulation expert Dr. Rebecca Smith-Coggins, professors in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. NYLF Medicine students will learn first-hand how to care for a patient in an emergency using only the materials at hand, employing time-tested techniques that are used around the world.

“We’re proud to have some of the most well-regarded and prominent leaders, educators, and physicians in the medical community provide support to and directly participate in NYLF Medicine, speaking to student groups and designing exciting curriculum modules like this simulation,” says Andrew Potter, Chief Academic Officer at Envision. “Not all emergencies take place in hospitals, so it is crucial for students to have skills in spine precautions, tying a tourniquet, hypothermia prevention, and more.”

Held in nine U.S. cities, NYLF Medicine represents an opportunity for aspiring doctors and medical professionals to get hands-on experience and valuable insight from health care professionals that will help them succeed in their future medical studies and careers. Program attendees visit a state-of-the-art medical simulation center to train like professionals in a variety of medical procedures and technologies with guidance from experts.

Cincinnati’s St. Elizabeth ‘Saves Christmas’ with New Simulation Center

St. Elizabeth 'saves Christmas' with new Simulation Center

Cincinnati’s Soap Box Media recently covered the launch of a new simulation center “SIM” at the St. Elizabeth Training Education Center:

Imagine you’re a nurse in a hospital delivery room, and immediately after giving birth the mother starts hemorrhaging. It’s a situation you rarely face, maybe once in your career, but if you don’t do exactly the right thing very quickly, the mother’s life will be in peril.

How does the hospital ensure that you know what to do when there’s no time to think? How do they train you, the physician, the anesthesiologist and the facility’s blood bank staff to pull together as a team and make the correct decisions? St. Elizabeth Healthcare is counting on its new Simulation Center to make the difference.

The SIM Center officially opened in late October as a 23,000-square-foot addition to the St. Elizabeth Training and Education Center, which itself opened in June. SETEC was fashioned from a former conference center in Erlanger to centralize all of St. Elizabeth’s staff training and development functions. The SIM Center utilizes lifelike mannequins in realistic hospital rooms with state-of-the-art equipment to create real-world scenarios for staff. And these aren’t the passive mannequins you might have seen used in CPR demonstrations.

SIM Center Manager Megan Vasseur says the mannequins have heartbeats, breathing sounds and pulses everywhere we have pulses, and some even blink, sweat and cry. One female mannequin delivers a baby, complete with a reservoir of blood and bodily fluids that do their thing at the appropriate time.

“These mannequins are very realistic, which is kind of a strange experience at first if you’re not used to it,” Vasseur said. “But they provide a much higher level of experience for our staff and help them develop better skills than the old way of working on each other or on live volunteers. We focus a lot of our simulation work on low-volume, high-risk situations that don’t happen all that often, but when they do, you have to be proficient at fixing them. With these mannequins, if you make a mistake it’s not life and death — you learn from your mistakes, practice your skills and get better.”

Interested in getting such media attention to your simulation program? Read our Press Tutorial Guide here!