University of Tennessee, BlueCross BlueShield, and B-Line Medical Team Up to Improve Patient Safety Through Healthcare Simulation

simulation grant tennessee

Last Week Newswise shared how The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) will soon be putting a BlueCross BlueShield (BCBS) grant of $2.9M to work promoting patient safety and healthcare education through an interdisciplinary healthcare simulation center!

HTHSC’s healthcare simulation center will be one of the largest in the world, and it will be interdisciplinary, accommodating training programs for Medicine, Nursing, Allied Health, Pharmacy and Dentistry within the center. Students from these different programs will be working together in a safe, immersive, and simulated healthcare environment that teaches them to tackle today’s biggest healthcare challenges in a risk-free setting.



B-Line Medical’s SimCapture platform was selected by HTHSC to manage and operate the simulation center. Over three hundred coordinated and centralized video streams throughout the center incorporate multiple camera angles and medical devices for comprehensive event capture. UTHSC faculty will use SimCapture to record, analyze, and evaluate the performance of interdisciplinary healthcare teams. SimCapture will also allow faculty to provide students with robust, web-based portfolios and a firm understanding of their simulation outcomes.

President of B-Line Medical, Hartley Thompson says, “UTHSC’s and BCBS’ commitment to healthcare simulation and patient safety aligns perfectly with our company’s mission and vision. We’re honored to have been chosen for such an important and progressive project. The scope and interdisciplinary approach taken by UTHSC will be a model for other institutions to follow.”


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88% of US-Born Sex Trafficking Victims Receive Medical Care – USF Med Student Creates Simulation Scenario to Help ID Warning Signs

Human Trafficking, Behind the Scene

Michelle Lyman, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine is a third year medical student, has created a simulation scenario to help healthcare providers better identify those who may be victims of sex trafficking. Recently she shared about the experience and the reasons why she built the scenario on in-training.org. I have reached out to Michelle in the hopes that she will share her scenario with us so stay tuned to this article for future updates!

In-Training.org Excerpt:

“Physicians across many specialties are treating trafficked persons in their practice. Yet, they are not trained to recognize human trafficking or know how to intervene. Studies have shown that 88% of US-born sex trafficking victims reported receiving medical care while being trafficked . This puts healthcare providers in a key position with these vulnerable individuals to aid in identification, prevention and intervention, but only if they are educated about the clinical presentations of human trafficking. In an effort to increase health care’s capacity to fight human trafficking, I worked behind the scenes at my medical school’s simulation center, creating a clinical scenario centered on treating a trafficked person for my fellow students to learn from.

This case was designed to expose future physicians to the complexity of human trafficking. The simulation center provides a learning environment to explore uneasy feelings in difficult clinical scenarios and practice building trust. It is okay to become flustered and misspeak — this experience is formative; however, when the students are the practicing physicians in a few short years, stakes are higher. Watching through the two-way mirror, I saw students grow. Most were courteous; however, few took the extra effort to build a certain degree of trust with their distracted patient sitting on the examination table. This patient’s clipped responses to questions often intimidated many students, leading them to shy away from asking heavy questions about her history with abuse.

Patients benefited the most from those students who were compassionate. Students who succeeded built a relationship by being empathetic. They looked beyond the exterior of a stoic young woman and offered her confidentiality, demonstrating respect for her decision to disclose. Their tone was non-judgmental and gentle when they took notice of her brandings that signaled her trafficking history. I also watched as standardized patients shut down and students walked away unaware. Some sped through their mental checklist, forgetting that simply looking and inspecting the patient might tell them more than a blood test. Others took too direct an approach, demanding a more detailed history, only to be met with a wall of resistance and no new information.

For the simulation case, the patient sitting on the exam table is a collection of narratives from individuals who have experienced human trafficking and survived. It is my goal that by interacting with this patient, students will learn from their missteps now and be able to see the signs of trafficking for what it is later. After all, being cognizant enough to recognize a patient in need of resources to advocate for their own health is all part of the job. Empathy and empowerment thereafter are crucial, but being able to provide such values takes practice and dedication.”

Michelle is in the SELECT Program at the University of South Florida. Originally from Jacksonville Florida, Michelle currently lives in Allentown, Pennsylvania where she is completing her third year clerkships. She is interested in public health and patient advocacy.

iSimulate Sponsors Award of 2017 Recipient of Street Medicine Society Award

JEMS and PennWell Corporation Announce the 2017 Recipient of John P. Pryor, MD/ Street Medicine Society Award

Last week Jeremy T. Cushman, MD, MS, EMT-P, was awarded the 2017 John P. Pryor, MD/Street Medicine Society Award at the EMS Today conference in Salt Lake City, UT which was sponsored by iSimulate. ohn P. Pryor, MD, FACS, an EMS physician, was killed on Dec. 25, 2008, while serving in Iraq. Dr. Pryor posthumously received the first award in his name at the 2009 EMS Today Conference. Each year the SMS awards a physician who has come up through the ranks as an EMS provider and constantly demonstrates a sincere and ongoing dedication to the betterment of EMS through clinical excellence or educational, logistical and/or humanitarian initiatives.

The award, sponsored by iSimulate, recognizes Dr. Cushman’s exemplary service to the field of emergency medicine and, specifically, emergency medical services (EMS). In 2006 Dr. Cushman became the medical director for the Gates Fire District in New York. Today he represents almost 30 fire and 10 ambulance agencies in a county with a population of 750,000 people. JEMS (Journal of Emergency Medical Services) seeks to improve patient care in the prehospital setting and promote positive change in EMS by delivering information and education from industry leaders, change makers and emerging voices. Dr. Cushman has been instrumental in developing, coordinating and implementing many programs and policies for his agencies over the last 10 years, including:

  • First responder naloxone procedure and delivery;
  • The Check & Inject New York project, which has saved millions of dollars across the state by having EMS use syringes to deliver epinephrine;
  • A county-wide firefighter rehabilitation and safety program; and
  • A program for influenza and Ebola preparedness that allows for an appropriate response without exposing responders to unnecessary risk.

Additionally, Dr. Cushman revised the Gates Fire Districts’ Quality Assurance and Quality Inspection program for patient care reports, creating a real-time process that provides valuable education to EMTs and assisted the 9-1-1 center with the emergency medical dispatch coding program to ensure responses optimize patient outcome.

Founded in July 1995, the mission of the Street Medicine Society (SMS) is to provide an informal forum for the growing group of physicians who got their start as EMS professionals, providing inspiration and expertise for the industry and to serve as advocates and mentors for the modern EMS professional.

ABOUT iSimulate
iSimulate uses the best of current mobile technology to create products that are more advanced, simpler to use, and more cost effective than traditional medical simulation solutions. iSimulate recently launched some of our favorite new products from IMSH 2017 which you can learn more about here! Learn more about iSimulate here.


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University of California Irvine Seeks Emergency Medicine Simulation Fellows

medical simulation fellowship

The University of California, Irvine, Department of Emergency Medicine is seeking applicants for a Simulation Fellowship with an application period of July 1st, 2016 through June 30th, 2017

University of California, Irvine, Department of Emergency Medicine (EM) is seeking a HS Clinical Instructor- Medical Simulation Fellow for July, 2017. University of California, Irvine Medical Center is a Level I Trauma center with 5,000 runs/year, 50,000 ED census, with a nationally recognized three-year residency program since 1989. The UC Irvine Medical Education Simulation Center is a new $40 million, 65,000-square-foot facility that provides telemedicine and simulation-based educational programs and CME courses for thousands of healthcare providers each year. The four-story medical education center includes a full-scale operating room, emergency room, trauma bay, obstetrics suite and critical care unit. The simulation fellow will have the opportunity to educate/train and form cooperative collaborative relationships with medical students, residents, nurses, allied health professionals, EMTs, paramedics, and physicians while developing and delivering innovative simulation curriculum. Our simulation-based content has been implemented in educational courses at the local, regional, national and international level. The simulation fellow will have the opportunity to present at local, regional, national, and international conferences.

The Medical Simulation Fellowship is a one year mentored fellowship that offers advanced training in simulation teaching, curriculum design, educational program implementation, study design, and research for a graduate of an accredited Emergency Medicine residency program. A two-year track is available for those applicants in pursuit of an advanced degree. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and proportion of clinical effort.

Submit your CV and statement of interest on the UCI website!

American Academy of Pediatrics & Kognito Launch Simulation System to Train Pediatricians

kognito simulation

The American Academy of Pediatrics and Kognito recently announced the launch of Artificial Perfection: Talking to Teens about Performance Enhancement – a free, role-play simulation designed to prepare pediatricians and other child health professionals to lead real-life conversation with teens about appearance and performance-enhancing substances.

About Kognito

Kognito is a healthcare simulation company that believes in the power of conversation to inspire and inform, impact how people think and act, evoke empathy, and change lives. We are pioneers in developing research-proven, role-play simulations that prepare individuals to lead real-life conversations. We build and assess their confidence and competency by providing them the ability to practice conversations with our growing family of emotionally-responsive virtual people. Our innovative approach uses the science of learning, the art of conversation and the power of game technology to measurably improve social, emotional, and physical health. Leading health, education, government, and non-profit organizations use our growing portfolio of simulations. Kognito is the only company with health simulations listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP).

Press Release Excerpt:

The use of appearance and performance-enhancing substances among youth has increased tremendously over the past decade. More than 10 percent of adolescents have misused prescription stimulants for cognitive enhancement, and about 6 percent of the general high school population has used illegal steroids for appearance or strength enhancement. Physicians should be aware of the use of performance-enhancing substances by pediatric patients; be prepared to identify risk factors, signs, and symptoms; ask screening questions; and offer anticipatory guidance related to their use.

This innovative simulation engages users in role-play conversations with three virtual and emotionally responsive patients presenting with signs of appearance and performance-enhancing substances. As the health professional in the simulation, users choose what to say to the virtual patient, how to respond to their hesitations, resistance, and misconceptions, and how to use motivational interviewing techniques to motivate them to change their behavior.

Actors Play Patients to Train Medical Students for Real-Life Work

Actors play patients to train medical students for real-life work

 

More great simulation news from Singapore this week, with an article highlighting the use of Standardized Patients to help medical students learn. Read last week’s article about the new partnership between SingHealth and the SCDF for paramedic simulation training.

Excerpt from StraitTimes:

Medical schools are turning to part-time actors to help students polish their bedside manners, long before they reach a real patient’s bedside. The actors take part in elaborate role plays, simulating patients to help mimic the challenges of hospital work. This could mean playing a distraught family member, a patient who cannot speak English or a senior doctor.

“I’m driven very much by the fact that it gives me a chance to help put the doctors’ hearts into medicine,” said Mr Davin Boo, who used to be a bit-part actor and is now self- employed.

The 48-year-old has been part of the National University of Singapore (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine’s programme for the past three years.

Even with acting experience, he said that working as a simulated patient can be challenging as it requires improvisation. I’ve been lectured by doctors or felt judged, or just treated as a figure in a ward. It’s wonderfully satisfying to be able to help change that. DAPHNE ONG, a professional actress, on what she hopes to achieve by working as a simulated patient. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As an actor, you just go by the script,” he said. “As a simulated patient, you may be able to pre- empt responses, but it’s not a fixed script on the other end.”

Retired teacher Eugene Eu, 58, said that he likes the ability to interact with young people and – a personal bonus – understand what his daughter has to deal with. “My daughter has just started doing her nursing diploma and, with this experience that I have, I’m able to empathise with her,” he said. “We have this thing in common.”

NUS has around 160 such actors, while the new Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has around 100. Associate Professor May Lim, who is programme director for occupational therapy at SIT, said: “We decided it’s very important for students to learn from the people they will be treating, through interaction in the community and beyond a clinical setting.”

Singapore Civil Defense Force Paramedics to Train with Simulation & Upcoming Singapore “S3” Simulation Conference

250 SCDF paramedics to hone skills in hospitals

Recently the Singapore Civil Defense Force announced that it would be partnering with SingHealth to begin training through simulation. Both the Strait Times and Channel News Asia reported about this monumental healthcare simulation partnership.

Because of the massive adoption of simulation by Singapore, SimGHOSTS has partnered with SESAM and SingHealth to offer “S3” Simulation Conference October 31st – November 3rd, 2017. Learn more about this innovative collaborative event on the SimGHOSTS website!

Strait Times Excerpt:

“SCDF paramedics will be trained to deal with simulated emergencies at SingHealth’s new medical simulation institute, which was launched yesterday to train healthcare staff. More than 250 paramedics from the Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) will serve hospital attachments over the next six years, in a move to hone the skills of emergency services here.

This is in response to the complex needs of Singapore’s ageing population – with four in 10 emergency calls in 2015 involving seniors. Older people tend to have multiple health problems, which means paramedic training must get more sophisticated, explained SCDF chief medical officer Ng Yih Yng.

“When we manage the patients today, as compared with 20 years ago, (they) no longer have one problem where you can apply a single protocol,” he said. “We need to evolve the training from just application of protocol towards critical thinking and problem-solving… How do they prioritise and which is the problem they need to solve immediately.”

Yesterday, the SCDF inked a training deal with healthcare group SingHealth at a ceremony attended by Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean. Under the agreement, 14 nurses from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) will also be seconded to the SCDF’s 995 operations centre. This builds on an earlier pilot scheme involving four nurses that showed good results, including improving survival rates, said Associate Professor Marcus Ong, director of the unit for pre-hospital emergency care at the Health Ministry.

“Last month, one of my nurses told me that she gave instructions over the phone when someone was choking on a fishball… and that person was saved,” said Prof Ong, who is also a senior consultant at SGH’s emergency medicine department. “This is a very practical example of the difference they can make.” Both parties are also working to develop a programme to train senior paramedics to teach these advanced skills, eventually establishing them as paramedic educators.”

Learn more about the S3 Singapore Simulation Conference here!

Immersive Media Initiative Uses VR to Train Healthcare Students

Immersive Media Initiative uses virtual reality to train medical students

Almost weekly now, healthcare educational programs around the world are receiving grants and other financial support to explore the use of VR in healthcare education and training. Check out this recent article from the POST and an almost $1M grant to fund such research at Ohio University:

Alexa Hoynacke, a senior studying industrial systems engineering, plays a virtual reality game that involves touching targets as a part of the LEARNING study in Grover Center on November 5, 2015. Along with entertainment, virtual reality can also be used for healthcare purposes. With new virtual reality simulations, medical students can practice procedures and gain confidence in their craft faster. Since receiving an $878,000 grant from Ohio University’s Innovation Strategy program, the Immersive Media Initiative team was able to begin work on a handful of virtual reality projects — they have tackled filmmaking and enhanced journalism, and they have also been busy with multiple VR projects in the medical field.

Last summer, the Immersive Media Initiative shot 360-degree footage of emergency room patients. This was their first project in virtual reality healthcare. Eric Williams, associate professor of media arts and studies and co-creator of Immersive Media Initiative, consulted with Dr. Thanh Nguyn since he is in charge of training six medical students every semester. Williams said, “Here’s the technology we have, how can we help you train your interns better.” Williams said virtual reality lets you “go and and watch the same trauma bay procedure and figure out how everything works.” Medical students can benefit from using virtual reality as part of their training because traditional methods do not allow for as

Since receiving an $878,000 grant from Ohio University’s Innovation Strategy program, the Immersive Media Initiative team was able to begin work on a handful of virtual reality projects — they have tackled filmmaking and enhanced journalism, and they have also been busy with multiple VR projects in the medical field.

much access to bodies. There is only a limited supply of cadavers to work on, and the E.R. can receive an unsteady stream of new patients.

“Virtual reality not only makes it to feel like a person but makes it look like a person,” Fredricks said.

GE Partners with Saudi Arabia’s Princess Nourah University to Expand Simulation Training

GE, PNU to team up in healthcare and clinical simulation at KAAUH

From the Saudi Gazette:

Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University (PNU), the largest all-female university in the world, has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MoU) with GE with two overarching goals that will see GE moving its Saudi headquarters to the PNU Academic Complex in Riyadh, and the two entities undertaking joint work in Healthcare skills development and clinical simulations at King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAAUH).

The MoUs were signed at a ceremony at PNU by Dr Ahmed Mohammed Abuabah, CEO of KAAUH; Eng. Ahmed Nasser Albedaie, CEO PNU Endowment Company; and Hisham Al Bahkali, GE President & CEO, for Saudi Arabia & Bahrain. The ceremony took place in the presence of Dr. Hoda bint Mohamed Al-Ameel, Rector of PNU; Dr Saleh Abdullah Almezel, Vice Rector of PNU; and John Rice, GE Vice Chairman, along with other senior officials of PNU, KAAUH and GE.

As per the first MoU with PNU, GE will move all its operations in Riyadh to its new Saudi headquarters in PNU Academic Complex in 2018. A new state-of-the-art office will be designed to the highest standards of sustainability to accommodate all GE operations under one roof.

News Agency Covers the Leadership Behind the Healthcare Simulation Success Story

J. Cedar Wang, MSN, RN, GNP-BC, CHSE

NorthJersey.com recently did a profile of  J. Cedar Wang, director of simulation education at Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck. HealthySim really appreciates that this news agency did a piece sharing the professional career of a healthcare simulation champion — which helps to get the word out about the progress and power of simulation to the general community! Usually such news articles focus on the center and the equipment of simulation — so we thought this was a different and much needed angle on the people who make healthcare simulation work!

NorthJersey Excerpt:

J. Cedar Wang oversees the only hospital-based health care simulation training center in north Jersey. The Institute for Simulation Learning “seeks to train anyone along the continuum of care, including physicians, nurses, social workers, first responders, even the front desk staff,” she says. Essentially, simulation learning is the process of recreating real-life medical scenarios for training purposes. It has long been used the by the military and aeronautics industries, but it’s increasingly being tapped by health care professionals who see the life-saving potential of training in a hands-on, high-pressure environment that mirrors typical and extreme emergency situations.

“We’ve come to realize that we can do better,” she says, referencing the opportunity to “improve both the collective medical response to an emergency situation and the patient experience through compassionate communication and other soft skills.”

Since the institute opened in 2013, Wang and her team have trained more than 5,000 people, averaging 400 “learner encounters” a month, in areas ranging from cardiac arrest to dementia sensitivity training. In Wang, Holy Name could hardly have found a better person for the job. A highly trained advanced practice nurse, gifted communicator and passionate educator, she possesses such a unique skill set that she easily balances simulation training with other duties ranging from grant writing and fundraising to marketing and, incredibly, construction management.

In 2016, Wang oversaw a 4,800-square-foot expansion of the simulation program, which was made possible by a $5 million grant from the Russell Berrie Foundation. The facility now features new simulated settings, including an apartment and a doctor’s office, as well as additional patient care rooms and a dual-purpose room that can be staged as an operating room or emergency room. “From cardiac arrest to seizures and childbirth, we are able to simulate every type of situation,” says Wang, explaining the crises her team of six full-team staff members (and their high-fidelity simulators) are capable of portraying.