Association for Standardized Patient Educators Releases Standards of Best Practice

association for standardized patient educators standards

The Association for Standardized Patient Educators (ASPE) have released Standards to go alongside those from INACSL, through the Journal Advances in Simulation which is free for all readers! In this paper, ASPE defines the Association of Standardized Patient Educators (ASPE) Standards of Best Practice (SOBP) for those working with human role players who interact with learners in a wide range of experiential learning and assessment contexts. Contributors include: Karen L. Lewis, Carrie A. Bohnert, Wendy L. Gammon, Henrike Hölzer, Lorraine Lyman, Cathy Smith,Tonya M. Thompson, Amelia Wallace and Gayle Gliva-McConvey.

The five domains identified by the document include:

Domain 1: Safe work environment
Domain 2: Case development
Domain 3: SP training
Domain 4: Program management
Domain 5: Professional development

ASPE Standards Abstract

These human role players are variously described by such terms as standardized/simulated patients or simulated participants (SP or SPs). ASPE is a global organization whose mission is to share advances in SP-based pedagogy, assessment, research, and scholarship as well as support the professional development of its members.


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The SOBP are intended to be used in conjunction with the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) Standards of Best Practice: Simulation, which address broader simulation practices. We begin by providing a rationale for the creation of the ASPE SOBP, noting that with the increasing use of simulation in healthcare training, it is incumbent on ASPE to establish SOBP that ensure the growth, integrity, and safe application of SP-based educational endeavors.

We then describe the three and a half year process through which these standards were developed by a consensus of international experts in the field. Key terms used throughout the document are defined. Five underlying values inform the SOBP: safety, quality, professionalism, accountability, and collaboration.

Finally, we describe five domains of best practice: safe work environment; case development; SP training for role portrayal, feedback, and completion of assessment instruments; program management; and professional development. Each domain is divided into principles with accompanying key practices that provide clear and practical guidelines for achieving desired outcomes and creating simulations that are safe for all stakeholders.

Failure to follow the ASPE SOBP could compromise the safety of participants and the effectiveness of a simulation session. Care has been taken to make these guidelines precise yet flexible enough to address the diversity of varying contexts of SP practice. As a living document, these SOBP will be reviewed and modified periodically under the direction of the ASPE Standards of Practice Committee as SP methodology grows and adapts to evolving simulation practices.

You can review the and download the ASPE SOBP on the Springer Publisher Website!


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DiaMedical USA Partners with SimUSuit to Offer Bariatric Patient Simulation | IMSH Video Interview

obesity healthcare simulation suit

During IMSH 2017 HealthySim.com was on hand to learn more about the Bariatric trainers created by Sim-U-Suit and distributed by DiaMedical.

The Adult Full Body Sim-U-Suit was created to enhance simulations for the future generation of doctors and nurses to properly prepare for the bariatric patient! The Full Body Sim U Suit is the ONLY full body obesity suit that including both arms and legs in one piece! This revolutionary simulation product can fit almost any manikin or can be worn by a standardized patient! Multiple access holes are implanted throughout the suit for simple IV, peri care, enema and catheterization simulations. With the growing bariatric patient population in the US, the Sim U Suit is an absolute necessity for every simulation lab.

SIM-U-SUIT obesity suits let your program simulate true-to-life size, look, and weight of bariatric patients. Their suits can be worn by real people, or used on manikins and human patient simulators. You can make the suit as heavy or light as your scenario dictates. The Sim-U-Suit products enable your simulation program to teach safe/proper care for the growing number of overweight patients in the healthcare system today.

Obesity training systems are also available as:

  • Adult Edema Simulation Leg Sleeves
  • Adult Edema Simulation Arm Sleeves
  • Pediatric Obesity Suit

Learn more about the Obesity Suit on the DiaMedical Website today!

Real Time Conversations with Barbie Demonstrate Potential of Interactive Communication with Our Simulated Manikins

patient communication simulation

I predict that one day in the near future, our healthcare simulation manikins will talk back to us automatically, without needing a clinical instructor to act as the voice of the patient. Think I watch too many sci-fi movies? Check out this NY Times article on a Wi-Fi Barbie “with the soul of Siri”, which enables children playing with the toy to speak with Barbie and receive cloud-based interactive, memory-supported conversations.

“Founded in 2011, ToyTalk already produces popular animated conversational apps — among them the Winston Show and SpeakaZoo — that encourage young children to engage in complex dialogue with a menagerie of make-believe characters. Now the company’s technology, originally designed for two-dimensional characters on-screen, is poised to power tangible playthings that children hold in their hands.

This fall, Mattel plans to introduce Hello Barbie, a Wi-Fi enabled version of the iconic doll, which uses ToyTalk’s system to analyze a child’s speech and produce relevant responses.

To develop a system that could both understand a child’s comments and say something engaging back, the company built its own platform to process spoken language — one tailored to the pitch of children’s voices, their prosody and vocabulary. Now, for instance, when a child says “totes jelly” to a ToyTalk app, the language processor understands the phrase actually means: “I’m totally jealous.””

Besides carrying on a conversation, Hello Barbie can play games and tell jokes and stories. Throughout it all, Barbie will be picking up on likes and dislikes, remembering to use what she’s learned in future conversations. That’s right—not only can Barbie now be your best friend, she’s probably a better listener than most of your real friends, too!”

Why couldn’t this same technology be adopted for healthcare-patient engagements, offering learners the opportunity to engage with simulated patients without the need for a clinical educator (of the same age and gender)?

Read the full NY Times article A Wi-Fi Barbie Doll With the Soul of Siri


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