Complete Administrator’s Guide To Healthcare Simulation ‘HealthySimAdmin’ Program Series Now Available for Free!

healthysimadmin

Sim champs HealthySimulation.com is welcoming 2017 with a bang by recapping for you here ALL eight HealthySimAdmin videos! Each of these 2 hour recorded sessions provides key administrative insights by an entire panel of leading healthcare simulation program directors! Sponsored by Laerdal, B-Line Medical, and Pocket Nurse, the original value of watching the program online was $450, but now the entire program is available to watch for free online!

HealthySimAdmin was the world’s first broadcasted event providing an open and online discussion to share administrative solutions for the “how to” of medical simulation. Hundreds of simulation program administrators from around the world have watched the HealthySimAdmin panel of sim lab management experts from hospital, military, community college and university nursing programs, medical schools, EMS providers as well as medical simulation consultant groups to cover eight community-selected topics which included: Collaborative simulation program development, Funding sources & models, Faculty/educator buy-in, Research coordination, Daily operations, IT issues & support, Increasing utilization & Business development!

medical simulation consulting

Watch this highlight to preview some of the thousands of administrative tips to be gained from HealthySimAdmin:



Learn what other sim lab administrators are saying about HealthySimAdmin:

Each of the following sessions starts with a 40 minute presentation by the associated key speaker which is then followed by 60 minutes of discussion and Q&A session by the entire expert panel:

Part 1: “Collaborative Simulation Program Development” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN

Part 2: “Funding Sources & Models” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN & COL (Ret) John McManus, MD, MCR

Part 3: “Clinical Educator Training & Buy-in” – Jane Kleinman RN, MAOM

Part 4: “Sim Research Development” – Amar Pravin Patel, MS, NREMT-P, CFC

Part 5: “Maximizing Daily Operations” – Henry Henao MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC, EMT

Part 6: “IT Structures & Issues” – James Cypert BAP, BAIT, MCSE, MCT, MCP

Part 7: “Increasing Sim Program Utilization” – Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D.

Part 8: “Business Development & Revenue Generation” – Lance Baily, HealthySimAdmin Organizer

Complete Session Details are available on those pages. Reasons to Watch HealthySimAdmin, NOW TOTALLY FREE:

  • Expand your knowledge by learning from a diverse group of sim admins
    The HealthySimAdmin panel of experts is comprised of successful simulation program administrators from a variety of settings including: community, state and university nursing schools, medical schools, EMS programs, hospitals, IT departments, and the military. Additional panel members will include leading industry consultants who have designed and managed sim labs around the globe. HealthySimAdmin will not only share “proven-to-work” techniques from others in your field but also provide an expanded perspective from others that utilize medical simulation within healthcare.
  • Learn from your new professional community
    Currently there are no professional degrees in medical simulation program management. Simulation program administrators have varied experience which may include successful or maybe, not so successful, strategies for managing a simulation center/lab. For example, a sim lab program manager with an IT background will have little trouble integrating their center’s network technology, but may find clinical educator training and buy-in much more challenging. In that sense, our growing international community is the best resource we have for learning and sharing the best practices in each of the numerous facets necessary to operate a simulation lab. HealthySimAdmin’s mission is to create a global and shared community online space where healthcare simulation program administrators can find and share information unique to medical simulation management.
  • Participate from anywhere in the world
    What happened in Vegas did not stay in Vegas with HealthySimAdmin! With any high-speed internet connection you will be able to watch HealthySimAdmin wherever you are. Join an international audience of healthcare simulation managers who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and gain global insight into the operations and development of a successful medical simulation program.
  • Maximize your time with medical simulation admin specific content
    While the methodology of simulation in healthcare continues to expand exponentially across the globe, the discussions regarding the operations and management of this technology are relatively new. And while other medical simulation-based meetings do exist, they primarily serve our community’s clinical educators. Thus, resources and guidance for program administrators remains limited. To address this challenge, HealthySimAdmin held an event specifically designed to meet the needs of healthcare simulation program administrators. Catch up to the hundreds of other administrators who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and maximize your time and resources by engaging with content that is as unique as your profession!

Sign Up for HealthySimulation.com’s Free Email Newsletter for more Great Content!


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Integrating Scenario-Based Simulation Into Radiology Education Improves Learning Outcomes

radiology simulation research

Check out the conclusion of this Dovepress Journal Research entitled “Integrating of scenario-based simulation into radiology education to improve critical thinking skills”, which found that “the integration of scenario-based simulations in radiology education led to a positive impact on learning outcomes, formative interactive learning, and filling the gap between theory and practice. Moreover, it promoted critical thinking skills and allowed radiology professionals to demonstrate their knowledge of similar cases.”

The article was published November 7th, 2016 by authors Abuzaid MM and Elshami W from, Medical Diagnostic Imaging Department, College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

Introduction: For many years, conventional radiographic films have been used for radiology education. Nevertheless, advances in imaging modalities, image quality, and the number of images produced by various methods have seen a move toward digital formats. Certainly, a patient’s case has a significant value in medical education; it can transfer theoretical knowledge to real experiences. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of scenario-based simulations in radiology education and their impact on professional learning outcomes.

Materials and methods: Patient scenarios were collected and converted to digital teaching files, each supported by clinical history, anatomy illustration, as well as medical and radiological investigation. The scenarios were presented online to radiology professionals for 6 months. At the end of the study, the scenarios were evaluated regarding design, content, and their role in improving critical thinking.

Results: Twenty-two scenarios were published online covering various radiology areas. Two hundred and thirty-eight radiology professionals were invited, and 84% participated in the evaluation process. Each participant completed an average of 13 scenarios with an approximate time of 23 minutes for each. The majority of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the scenarios were well designed (94%), were appropriate to their level of knowledge (70%), and helped them in critical thinking and in understanding similar cases (79%).

Beyond Debriefing – Studiocode from Vosaic Enables for High Level Research Studies for Healthcare Simulation

vosaic studiocode healthcare simulation

Check out the latest news about Studiocode from Vosaic, which provides high level research opportunities during a/v recording debriefing of your healthcare simulation event. Note: While Studiocode is a standalone product — You can also add Studiocode on top of an existing video solution product to enhance research capabilities!

  • Discover Opportunities: As the capstone product, Studiocode provides endless possibilities for analysis, leading to even deeper insights. Customized video tagging identifies specific moments useful to your research process.
  • Quickly Identify the Crucial Moments: Create timelines, databases, and transcription text that allow for easy cross-referencing and analysis, helping you identify patterns and trends as they emerge.
  • User Self-Discovery: The ability for users to refer to their own videos allows students, researchers, and educators alike to see how their performance is affecting the outcome of their research projects or simulations. This data can be collected and organized to influence future efforts while facilitating debrief scenarios to further learning opportunities.

Studiocode Features Include:

  • Live Markup/Coding
  • Build Markup/Code Forms
  • Live Record Video
  • Import Recorded Video
  • Advanced Markup/Coding
  • Post Markup/Coding
  • Basic Reporting
  • Video Transcription
  • Deep Analysis Tools
  • Advanced Reporting
  • Cloud Storage (add-on)
  • Cloud Sharing (add-on)

About Vosaic In Their Own Words

Video is an invaluable tool for research and learning opportunities. Our video analysis software lets you interpret the multi-faceted elements of video while identifying patterns that form a comprehensive picture. Creating clarity around results and discovering trends that may not be otherwise immediately apparent can lead to more robust outcomes. These new insights facilitate the training and education of everyone from nurses and physicians to mathematical researchers.

Our passion for video analysis means that we are fully invested in all the fields our users work in. We understand your unique needs and that helps drive product utilization, ensuring that you’re maximizing the features of the Vosaic products to produce your best results. Agile and customizable, Vosaic can be applied to almost every need or industry. The fields of healthcare, education, and research in particular have found Vosaic to be an invaluable tool that encourages new insights and drives growth and performance.

Learn more on the Vosaic website today!


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Integrating Research Into Your Healthcare Simulation Program – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 4

sim lab management

Last month we publicly launched that the highly praised HealthySimAdmin video series with Part 1: Collaborative simulation program development. Today we continue our ongoing exploration of how to start and expand a healthcare simulation program with Part 4 of HealthySimAdmin: Building Research Programs Into Healthcare Simulation. This 2-hour recording starts with a presentation by Dr. Amar Patel of WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning — which is also the host of SimGHOSTS 2017 USA — and then finishes off with a panel session by a dynamic range of simulation program administrators who provide advice for those integrating research into their simulation programs. Thank to Laerdal, B-Line Medical, and Pocket Nurse these recorded sessions are now available for free to the public!

About Part 3 of HealthySimAdmin:

Medical Simulation is quickly becoming a leading methodology for clinical skills based education
and training. Impacting how our learners understand and apply the content is just as important as expanding our understanding of how to improve human and system processes. Groups interested in developing and funding or expanding current research into simulation will find this session led by Amar Patel MS, REMT-P, CFC extremely useful. Amar will lead our discussion highlighting the successful integration of research at the facility he manages.

Amar shares:

  • Types of research that can be conducted (scopes of projects)
  • Costs associated with conducting and managing research projects
  • Funding opportunities
  • The Return on Investment
  • What you need to know to begin (documents, education, IRB, policies & Procedures)
  • Publishing abstracts and completed research projects
  • Data collection and analysis
  • Setting up the simulation environment (is it research friendly?)

Afterwards our panel engaged in a discussion on how to build and facilitate a successful research component into your simulation program. An audience question and answer period will follow the panel discussion. Through this session we learned how to conduct, integrate, and manage research projects. Furthermore, we will highlight ways to incentivize educators to engage in successful simulation-based research projects that will promote your institution and your program.

Session Presentation Lead By:

Amar Pravin Patel, MS, NREMT-P, CFC
Director, Center for Innovative Learning
WakeMed Health & Hospitals

Amar Patel is the Director of the Center for Innovative Learning at WakeMed Health & Hospitals. Mr. Patel is responsible for integrating technology-based education to include human patient simulation, healthcare gaming, hybrid education, and intellectual property development at the local, regional, and national level. His passion for changing how human behavior and processes impact healthcare can be seen by his involvement in patient safety and risk management teams. Prior to this position, he served as an Advanced Life Support Program Instructor and the Project Manager of Medical Simulation for the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute at the University of Maryland, College Park. In this role he was responsible for developing new curriculum, as well as integrating medical simulation into all of the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Programs. He was the lead developer of simulation scenarios and technical simulation expert at the local and state level. Mr. Patel has taught numerous instructor courses, including ones offered on an international circuit. He has presented at several conferences, including JEMS EMS Today, the Human Patient Simulation Conference, Laerdal SUN, and the Air Medical Transport Conference.

While educating EMS providers all over the state, Mr. Patel also maintained clinical competency with the Baltimore County Fire Department in Baltimore, Maryland as a national registered paramedic, haz-mat technician and a firefighter. Currently, Amar maintains over 17 certifications to include a HAM radio operator’s license and a certified flight communicator.

Mr. Patel currently serves as the chair of two different committees: the Simulation Steering Committee at WakeMed Health & Hospitals and the Medical Educator’s Transport Section for the Association for Air Medical Services. He is involved in simulation based research projects that focus on integration and implementation of simulation technology across disciplines. He has contributed to numerous simulation articles and travels around the United States providing assistance in simulation center design.

Mr. Patel holds a Bachelors of Arts degree in computer music from Goucher College, a Master’s of Science in Emergency Health Science with a concentration in Education from the University of Maryland Baltimore County, and is currently completing his Doctorate in Health Sciences degree at Nova Southeastern University.

Watch the whole HealthySimAdmin video series now here!

INSPIRE Provides Support to Healthcare Simulation Pediatric Reseachers

simulation research support

INSPIRE, aka The International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research & Education provides feedback to members on research related to research in healthcare simulation. The team has been growing steadily since launching in 2011.

Who is Inspire?

INSPIRE is built around novice and expert researchers, educators, and clinicians who are interested in collaborating across the globe to improve the care delivered to all neonates, infants, and children, using simulation.  Our membership and institutions have been steadily growing, and we represent 6 of the 7 continents. The INSPIRE infrastructure and logistical support comes from funds from both the RBaby Foundation & the Laerdal Foundation. We wish to extend a heartfelt thanks and gratitude for the support in carrying out our mission.

Research Support

The International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education (INSPIRE) network was formed in 2011 through the merger of the examining pediatric resuscitation education through simulation and scripting (EXPRESS) and patient outcomes in simulation education (POISE) networks, and is supported by the Laerdal Foundation for Acute Medicine and the RBaby Foundation. INSPIRE’s membership is international (North America, Europe, Middle East, and Australia) and includes 112 institutions. INSPIRE seeks to improve the delivery of medical care to acutely ill children through research in pediatric resuscitation, technical skills, behavioral skills, and simulation-based education. INSPIRE investigators have 15 studies planned, ongoing, or completed in areas including debriefing methods, teamwork, and simulation instruction in procedural and psychomotor skills, as well as simulation studies of clinical innovations. For example, the improving pediatric acute care through simulation (IMPACTS) study has developed and validated cases to study care of simulated infants by different emergency department teams; site enrollment has begun, with an anticipation that 32 hospitals will be involved (INSPIRE)

INSPIRE’s Executive Committee reviews and approves proposals, and develops policies and procedures for the network. An external Network Advisory Board provides counsel on study conduct and publications. INSPIRE has a consultative submission process (to obtain consultation to inform a submission) as well as a new project submission process. INSPIRE proposals with external support are expected to allocate 0.1 FTE for administrative support of the network (INSPIRE).

Learn more on the INSPIRE website today!

Latest Simulation in Healthcare Journal Article List from SSH

medical simulation research journal

The most recent Simulation in Healthcare Journal (October 2016 – Volume 11 – Issue 5
pp: 301-364) from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare has been posted online! This month’s journal provides a tribute to the “godfather” of medical simulation Dr. Gaba, and an exploration of new simulation technologies to improve healthcare learning outcomes:

  • Tribute to David Gaba on the Occasion of His Retiring as Editor-in-Chief of Simulation in Healthcare Cooper, Jeffrey B.; Issenberg, Barry S.; DeVita, Michael A.; Glavin, Ronnie
  • Comparison of 4 Laryngoscopes in 2 Difficult Airway Scenarios: A Randomized Crossover Simulation-Based Study Altun, Demet; Ozkan-Seyhan, Tulay; Orhan-Sungur, Mukadder; Sivrikoz, Nukhet; Camci, Emre
  • Mastery Learning of Video Laryngoscopy Using the Glidescope in the Emergency Department Ahn, James; Yashar, Michael D.; Novack, Jared; Davidson, Joey; Lapin, Brittany; Ocampo, Jose; Wang, Ernest
  • Preparation With Web-Based Observational Practice Improves Efficiency of Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Cheung, Jeffrey J.H.; Koh, Jansen; Brett, Clare; Bägli, Darius J.; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam
  • How Do Simulated Error Experiences Impact Attitudes Related to Error Prevention? Breitkreuz, Karen R.; Dougal, Renae L.; Wright, Melanie C.
  • Coaching From the Sidelines: Examining the Impact of Teledebriefing in Simulation-Based Training Ahmed, Rami A.; Atkinson, Steven Scott; Gable, Brad; Yee, Jennifer; Gardner, Aimee K.
  • The Role of Ultrasound Simulation in Obstetrics and Gynecology Training: A UK Trainees’ Perspective Patel, Hersha; Chandrasekaran, Dhivya; Myriokefalitaki, Eva; Gebeh, Alpha; Jones, Kate; Jeve, Yadava B; Midlands
  • Research Collaborative in Obstetrics & Gynecology Simulation for Operational Readiness in a New Freestanding Emergency Department: Strategy and Tactics Kerner, Robert L. Jr.; Gallo, Kathleen; Cassara, Michael; D’Angelo, John; Egan, Anthony; Simmons, John Galbraith
  • An Approach to Confederate Training Within the Context of Simulation-Based Research Adler, Mark D.; Overly, Frank L.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Davidson, Jennifer; Gottesman, Ronald; Bank, Ilana; Marohn, Kimberly; Sudikoff, Stephanie; Grant, Vincent J.; Cheng, Adam;
  • For the International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators Highlighting Instructional Design Features in Reporting Guidelines for Health Care Simulation Research Cheng, Adam; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Chang, Todd P.; Auerbach, Marc

SSH Members can read the latest journal edition here!

Debrief2Learn Aims to Improve Healthcare Outcomes with Effective Debriefing Practices

debrief 2 learn

Sharing the recent announcement of the collaborative project Debrief2Learn, aims to improve healthcare outcomes by fostering effective feedback and debriefing practices.

About Debrief2Learn:

Effective feedback and debriefing play a critical role in healthcare education in both simulated and workplace-based environments. Debrief2Learn supports clinical educators by sharing resources to guide faculty development and exploring the latest innovations. We aim to create an online community of practice for health professions educators while advancing knowledge through cutting-edge collaborative research. Debrief2Learn aims to improve healthcare outcomes by fostering effective feedback and debriefing practices. Effective feedback and debriefing play a critical role in healthcare education in both simulated and workplace-based environments.

We have designed Debrief2Learn with both educators and researchers in mind. This website will eventually be a comprehensive, one-stop resource for everything related to debriefing and feedback in healthcare education—and it will all be free to access. Internationally recognized experts in the field comprise our advisory board, who will help shape the content, format, and future direction of this website. Our collaborators are well-published leaders and innovators in the field who also share their ideas and expertise through presentations and workshops presented around the world.

To improve access to research, the research page lists relevant debriefing and feedback articles published by our team members. Each article can be accessed in a number ways: a link to PubMed, link to source journal, or a free PDF link (or a ResearchGate link to request a free PDF when this is not readily available). To assist with translating and using our research in your own setting, we offer resources and other helpful content, such as PDFs of our workshop slides and presentations.

To help you follow our research, we offer links to each paper’s Altmetric page (which provides links to online discussion about the research), a link to articles that cite our research, relevant blogs to innovative ideas, as well as social media accounts to keep you updated on the latest work. Finally, podcasts will feature leading international experts discussing recent papers in our field.

We have developed Debrief2Learn for you! Let us know if you’d like to get involved. You can contribute content (eg. Blogpost), collaborate in research, or become a team member. We’d love to hear from you!

Learn more about this innovative project and its team on Debrief2Learn.org!

Does Residency Simulated Training Have an Impact on Patient Outcomes in Robotic Surgery

simulated training

Christopher Simmonds from Mimic Technologies recently shared on LinkedIN some interesting research statistics regarding the patient results from simulated training in surgery.

Join the World’s Largest LinkedIN Medical Simulation Group

Like any new technology, a lot of focus has been placed on ensuring that new users of robotic surgery are adequately trained. Simulation has had a large part to play with this. As the technology has become more mainstream, training requirements have moved from not only training existing surgeons but to ensuring that residents and fellows develop the required skill levels to ensure that they can adapt to the new technologies used in their practice.

Earlier this year we discussed a paper published by the EAU on their curriculum aimed at ensuring that fellows followed a clear curriculum at the end of which they would be deemed to be safe and competent to operate on patients independently. As with many ways of teaching surgery, the procedure is broken into specific steps that the trainee must master before being allowed to carry the whole procedure.

There were no differences in some key clinical outcomes such as positive margins, length of stay, catheter days, readmissions or re-operations when comparing surgeon only to resident –involved cases. There was, however, a difference seen in mean operative time between procedures that were surgeon only cases vs. resident involved (190.4 Min vs. 206.4 Min, P= 0.003)

Read the full article on LinkedIn

Supporting Transitions in Medical Career Pathways: the Role of Simulation-Based Education

advances in simulation journal

This article is also translated in Spanish!

Have you checked out the Advances in Simulation journal yet? Great news it’s free for everyone online thanks to the folks at SESAM! Just finished reviewing “Supporting transitions in medical career pathways: the role of simulation-based education” by Jennifer Cleland et al., and found it very useful for us all to consider!

About Advances in Simulation Journal

Advances in Simulation provides a forum to share scholarly practice to advance the use of simulation in the context of health and social care. Advances in Simulation publishes articles that cover all science and social science disciplines, all health and social care professions and multi- and inter-professional studies. The journal includes articles relevant to simulation that include the study of health care practice, human factors, psychology, sociology, anthropology, communication, teamwork, human performance, education, learning technology, economics, biomedical engineering, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, therapeutics, scientific computation, simulation modelling, population studies, theatre, craft, program evaluation and more.

Abstract

Transitions, or periods of change, in medical career pathways can be challenging episodes, requiring the transitioning clinician to take on new roles and responsibilities, adapt to new cultural dynamics, change behaviour patterns, and successfully manage uncertainty. These intensive learning periods present risks to patient safety. Simulation-based education (SBE) is a pedagogic approach that allows clinicians to practise their technical and non-technical skills in a safe environment to increase preparedness for practice. In this commentary, we present the potential uses, strengths, and limitations of SBE for supporting transitions across medical career pathways, discussing educational utility, outcome and process evaluation, and cost and value, and introduce a new perspective on considering the gains from SBE. We provide case-study examples of the application of SBE to illustrate these points and stimulate discussion.

Conclusions

Increasing doctors’ preparedness to perform the skills and behaviours required to fulfil the responsibilities of any new role is important for patient safety, service efficiency, and individual psychological well-being. Whilst true mastery of a role cannot be achieved until one is immersed within the workplace itself [6], the literature indicates that we can go some way to preparing individuals for the technical and non-technical elements of any new role, and indeed the associated psychological challenges, through the judicious and imaginative use of SBE. In this paper, we have provided an overview of some of the key factors associated with planning and evaluating SBE for transitions.

We have also highlighted a number of areas for future research in SBE to support medical career transitions. These include the development of understanding around the practical factors to be considered when designing SBE, ranging from the delivery of feedback and the incorporation of longer term outcome measures to analysis of the cost-effectiveness of the approach being undertaken, as well as the socio-cultural influences on learning in simulated settings. We urge those working in SBE research to consider how best to identify and evaluate concrete specific outcomes of SBE for this purpose. There remains the need for further investigation into the use of SBE to support the transition from medical student to junior doctor, but we urge those working in this area to not neglect examining the use of SBE to support later medical career transitions where “learners” are working with less supervision and increasing responsibility yet where (largely non-technical) issues pertinent to patient safety remain apparent.

Read the full article on the Advances in Simulation Journal

Media Covers May BMJ Article: “Medical Error 3rd Leading Cause of Death in U.S.” – Call for New Hashtag #SimToZero!

medical errors and simulation

Earlier this month the BMJ published a study by medical researchers from John Hopkins which provided a deeper analysis into the 2014 Journal of Patient Safety. Check out more about the new article here, and listen to this BMJ Podcast interview about the research:

About the Analysis:

Analyzing medical death rate data over an eight-year period, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts have calculated that more than 250,000 deaths per year are due to medical error in the U.S. Their figure, published May 3 in The BMJ, surpasses the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s third leading cause of death—respiratory disease, which kills close to 150,000 people per year. The Johns Hopkins team says the CDC’s way of collecting national health statistics fails to classify medical errors separately on the death certificate.

The researchers are advocating for updated criteria for classifying deaths on death certificates. “Incidence rates for deaths directly attributable to medical care gone awry haven’t been recognized in any standardized method for collecting national statistics,” says Martin Makary, professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and an authority on health reform. “The medical coding system was designed to maximize billing for physician services, not to collect national health statistics, as it is currently being used.”

This publication really caught a lot of media attention:

  • CBS News – “For the study, Makary and his colleagues evaluated four separate studies that analyzed medical death rate data from 2000 to 2008, including one by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Based on 2013 data on hospitalization rates, they found that of 35,416,020 hospitalizations, 251,454 deaths stemmed from a medical error. They said that adds up to 9.5 percent of all deaths a year in the U.S.”
  • Huffington Post“Unfortunately, this news is not surprising at all. In the medical community, we have seen the consequences of inaccurate diagnoses and medical error for quite some time. While concrete efforts have been made to correct wrong site surgeries and other well publicized issues from the past, not enough has been done to address medical error that results from an incomplete or inaccurate diagnosis. 37% of the cases we review require a change in diagnosis, and over 75% of cases require a change in treatment plan.”
  • CNN – “One reason there’s such a wide range of numbers is because accurate data on these kinds of deaths is surprisingly sparse. That’s in part because death certificates don’t ask for enough data, Makary said. Currently the cause of death listed on the certificate has to line up with an insurance billing code. Those codes do not adequately capture human error or system factors.”
  • Washington Post ““There has just been a higher degree of tolerance for variability in practice than you would see in other industries,” he explained. When passengers get on a plane, there’s a standard way attendants move around, talk to them and prepare them for flight, Sands said, yet such standardization isn’t seen at hospitals. That makes it tricky to figure out where errors are occurring and how to fix them. The government should work with institutions to try to find ways improve on this situation, he said.”

Additional press Coverage spread wide and far…

Unfortunately, many of the articles did NOT cover potential solutions for addressing these avoidable mistakes. As champions of Simulation, we must reach out to these media agencies and remind them that healthcare simulation provides a huge opportunity to better educate and train for improved patient safety outcomes.

With this rare opportunity to maximize such exposure, I encourage you to write in and tweet these media agencies and remind them that simulation is already helping to address many of these problems with the hashtag #SimToZero, highlighting a goal to reduce medical errors to zero through the use of healthcare simulation.

Please join me in this new campaign to create a hashtag supporting
Simulation To Zero Patient Deaths From Medical Error!