Toyota Utilizes VR to Showcase the Future of Driving Simulation

vr driving in simulation

Imagine if high school students interested in healthcare could put on VR googles and experience the real world realities of being a healthcare provider? Recently Toyota utilized such technology to showcase the future of driving in a Prius — highlighting a potential in healthcare which we think could dramatically cut dropout rates for new healthcare professionals by showing them what the job is really like.

How do you convince a potential car buyer your vehicle is a future-focused choice? One way is to get one of the most iconic creators of cinematic futurescapes to help you build a virtual world that people can drive the car through themselves. Toyota enlisted Syd Mead, the creative visionary behind Blade Runner and Tron‘s vehicles, architecture and more.


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Mead provided concept art and designs for Toyota’s VR Prius Prime experience at Disrupt SF 16, which I tried out myself in a sneak preview earlier today. The demo includes a Tilt Brush-like immersive artistic creation component, followed by a “4D” VR ride.

The drive itself takes you through an animated world featuring landscapes and other cars pulled from Mead’s imagination, and it’s actually really convincing when paired with the movements from the seat. You actually have to buckle up when you use it, which I thought was just something to encourage safety in a cutesy way, but which actually is designed to prevent people potentially being thrown from the bucket seat.

Read the full article on TechCrunch!


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NBC News: The Promise of Virtual Reality is Starting to Look Very Real

oculus rift healthcare simulation

On NBC News Online Michael Sheetz just released this article saying that “The Promise of Virtual Reality is Starting to Look Very Real”. VR will be a huge component of healthcare simulation in the next decade, so check out this article which provides a great recap of currently available technologies and applications!

NBC News Article Excerpt:

Only a handful of virtual reality headsets existed when Alphabet unveiled Google Glass, but the past half-decade has seen billions invested in VR, moving a technology once thought of as a gimmick much closer to the everyday lives of real people. Virtual reality companies raised $1.46 billion in venture capital from the start of 2012 through the third quarter this year, according to CB Insights, marking four straight quarters that these start-ups reached $100 million-plus in funding. Since 2010, these firms have raised $3.9 billion, according to PitchBook.

“There is always a richer and more immersive medium,” Zuckerberg said. “The next logical step is fully immersive VR,” Zuckerberg told developers. He described the early days as “just a 360 video,” adding, “In the future you’re going to feel like you’re right there.”

Facebook’s Oculus virtual reality platform recently unveiled lower-cost hardware and a slew of media partnerships that aim to bring the technology to the mainstream — its debut is slated for the first quarter of 2016. While hard-core gamers wait for the Oculus Rift to launch for use with PCs, many consumers were anxious to get their hands on the consumer version of the Samsung Gear VR, which went on sale for $99 in November, half the price of the headset last year. It sold out on eBay and Amazon in a matter of days.

Read the full VR Article on NBCNews.com!

Arch Virtual Provides Realistic 3D Designing for Simulation Experiences & Sim Lab Layout

arch-virtual-health-care-medical-technology-virtual-reality-simulation

While searching the internet for all things simulation I stumbled upon Arch Virtual, who provides Realistic 3D Environments For Health Care Training.

About Arch Virtual

Health care simulations have become a significant amount of the work we’ve been doing with the Oculus Rift and the Unity3D game engine. We work directly with universities and healthcare institutions to provide real-time virtual simulations of medical environments such as hospitals, clinics, and emergency response stations for grant funded and other research-based simulations and training applications. In some cases, we are brought in to create the 3D environment only. In other cases, we develop projects from beginning to end, complete with animation, avatar development, interface and interactive components.

Amplify Training Experience With Guided Simulations As with architectural visualization, virtual medical environments and replicas of hospitals, clinics and emergency response stations present the opportunity to amplify real experiences with guided simulations that replicate substantial representations of the physical world in a virtually interactive manner.

Realistic Guided Simulations With The Oculus Rift We can create any kind of interactivity or customization required to suit the individual needs of each unique project. Equipment can be animated, custom avatars can be developed, additional rooms can be added, etc. We can also custom-brand this particular demo environment for your use, including your logo, splash-image, etc.

Learn more at Arch Virtual’s Healthcare Page!

 


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10 More Ways Virtual Reality is Revolutionizing Healthcare

medical-simulation-virtual-reality

Continuing our exploration of virtual reality today, here is a great article from TechRepublic entitled “10 ways Virtual Reality is Revolutionizing Medicine and Healthcare“. We should think of virtual reality not just in terms of what it can provide for healthcare professionals in terms of training, but also for rehabilitation and patient education.

“When people experience virtual reality for the first time, a common reaction is to start imagining all the different uses the technology might hold. Even within one industry, healthcare, the potential is open-ended. The good thing is that scientists and medical professionals have been at the drawing board for years now, developing and implementing virtual reality in ways that can help them train, diagnose, and treat in myriad situations.

Here are just ten of the use cases that are currently in practice and continually developing as the technology itself develops too:

  • Exposure therapy
  • Treatment for PTSD
  • Pain management
  • Surgical training
  • Phantom limb pain
  • Brain damage assessment and rehabilitation
  • Social cognition training for young adults with autism
  • Meditation Opportunities for the disabled
  • Opportunities for the homebound

I would add mass casualty scene management, patient assessment, ED scenarios and patient movement to the list. Here’s another list of VR’s affect in healthcare with some great videos on HuffintonPost.com:

  • Soothing Burn Victims’ Painful Therapy
  • Curing Phantom Pains In Amputee Victims
  • Therapy For Soldiers Suffering From PTSD
  • Treating Children With Autism
  • Allowing Surgical Students To Practice Techniques

 

Read the full TechRepublic article here and the HuffingtonPost Article here.

Let us know how you are using virtual reality for your healthcare programs!

Clemson University Utilizes VR Simulations to Train for Electrical & Manufacturing Industries

vr simulation manufacturing

South Carolina GSA Business recently covered the VR Simulation Training taking place at the Clemson University Center for Workforce Development. VR Oculus devices are providing electrical and manufacturing students the opportunity to safely practice new skills before entering more dangerous work scenarios. Sound familiar? My belief is that simulation will quickly become an integral part of all educational practices, from dealing with hot oil friers to office politics.

GSA Business Article Excerpt:

“No longer limited to video games, the simulations being developed at the Clemson University Center for Workforce Development are helping students across the country learn the skills that employers need in a modern manufacturing plant. One such simulation puts the user in a warehouse environment. The participant uses a keyboard or joystick to move around the virtual warehouse to identify safety violations. The virtual program gives feedback throughout the process.

The simulation gives a type of hands-on experience for the user without exposing them to the real hazards of a manufacturing setting.

Sabarish V. Babu, assistant professor in the School of Computing at Clemson, said: “Virtual simulations allow for interactive feedback. You receive instruction on how to actually use each instrument or program, then there’s an interactive, guided practice, with feedback as you’re performing the task.”

The virtual reality helps the student to safely practice their electrical testing skills while avoiding potential dangers that are present in the live labs, Isbell said. Once the students are comfortable with the virtual exercises they can then move to a live setting where an instructor can oversee the live work.

Dr. Anand Gramopadhye, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, said virtual reality is an innovative way to widen the pipeline that supplies the highly skilled workers the nation needs to be competitive.

“Manufacturing remains key to prosperity in our state and across the nation,” he said. “By teaching the skills needed in the next-generation workforce, our curriculum is helping shore up the middle class and putting families on the road to success.”

Read the full article on the GSA Business website!


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