Conquer Mobile Wins Best in Show Award at IMSH2017 Showcase with PeriopSim VR Training for Nurses

Conquer Mobile was awarded ‘Best in Show” at the International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (IMSH) Serious Games and Virtual Environments Showcase in Orlando last week. The company won the small company / entrepreneurial award for its PeriopSim Virtual Reality training for OR nurses.



Vancouver, BC (PRWEB) – February 7, 2017 – Conquer Mobile today announced that the company won a key award at IMSH, the leading event for the healthcare simulation industry, in Orlando this week. The IMSH Serious Games and Virtual Environments Showcase brought together 33 participants demonstrating innovative simulation training solutions for healthcare. A judging panel from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) made awards in 4 categories: large company, small/entrepreneurial company, researcher and student. Conquer Mobile won the entrepreneurial award for its PeriopSim VR instrument training for OR nurses.

The company’s PeriopSim iPad simulation training platform is already in use in over 300 facilities across North America. The fully immersive PeriopSim VR solution, using the HTC Vive hardware, was unveiled for the first time at the IMSH Serious Games showcase.
“We are so excited to win this award,” commented Angela Robert, CEO of Conquer Mobile. “PeriopSim VR has already been used in academic research but this is the first time we have shown our new immersive instrument trainer at a conference.”
This year’s IMSH conference was held from January 28-February 1 at the Hyatt Regency in Orlando Florida. IMSH brings together over 2,500 physicians, nurses, educators, administrators, centre operations directors, technology specialists and other health care leaders in medical simulation. The Serious Games and Virtual Environments Showcase is in its fifth year and attracts vendors and researchers from all over the world with new and innovative simulation solutions.
About PeriopSim
PeriopSim is a simulation training solution for iPad and VR, for clinicians who need to learn surgical instruments and procedures. PeriopSim enables surgical staff to practice safely before surgery.  Using video of real surgeries and voice prompts, users are guided through a surgery and prompted to use the correct tool at every step. Gamification techniques such as scoring and timed challenges motivate learners to practice and hone their skills. It is aimed at both students and experienced perioperative nurses preparing for unfamiliar procedures. It is designed to be purchased by educators, as part of a hospital education program, as an institutional purchase.
The product is currently part of a pilot program with the Association of Perioperative Nurses (AORN). It is in use at over 300 facilities across North America and is the subject of the top ranking international peer reviewed academic research paper on BioMedCentral. The paper, ‘Simulation-based training for burr hole surgery instrument recognition’, looks at the impact of simulation training for instrument knowledge and recognition among neurosurgery residents
PeriopSim is available as a free preview version on the App Store here: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id960363034&mt=8 .
About Conquer Mobile
Conquer Mobile is an education technology company specializing in healthcare. With deep expertise in VR, simulation, UX and gamification, the team creates engaging apps that deliver education as an experience. Current focus areas include: medical simulation training, enterprise safety education and custom VR and healthcare apps.

Sponsored Advertisement:


Is This The Reason Healthcare Simulation Isn’t Main Stream?

clinical simulation in nursing

Key Nursing Educators have spoken against the use of simulation for a very bizarre reason. In the latest “Clinical Simulation in Nursing” Journal December 2016 Volume 12, Issue 12, INACSL Journal Editor Suzan “Suzie” Kardong-Edgren explains a major misunderstanding about the use of healthcare simulation.

In the edition, Suzie provides a powerful reminder about the challenges faced for simulation in nursing education, and “what simulation is and how it is evolving”. In my opinion, the laggards of simulation technology adoption will cite any and every reason to reject modern advances in educational practices as the scapegoat for systematic failures. Another must-read commentary by one of our community’s most influential thought leaders entitled “High Fidelity Educators” which you can read here:

“A recent Researchgate citation alert led me to a most interesting editorial by Dean, Williams, and Balnaves (2016) entitled Living dolls and nurses without empathy. The lack of general understanding about what simulation is and how it is evolving, demonstrated in the editorial, provided fodder for thoughtful commentaries from many in the simulation community. This evolving commentary can be found in the blog section of the Journal of Advanced Nursing. It is well worth a read.

It remains very clear that a segment of the nursing education community does not understand that simulation is not about the manikin. However, learner deficits identified during simulation can be easily scapegoated because of the use of simulation. The upshot of the Dean et al. editorial is that nursing students are demonstrating less empathy and that the use of plastic dolls contributes to this. I contend a noted lack of empathy is not new (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010) but that we can clearly see it now during simulation.

Part of the skill set required of a simulation educator is choosing the right kind of simulation (standardized patient, manikin, or task trainer) to accomplish a learning outcome. It is probably not ideal to have a learning outcome of empathy embedded in a manikin-based simulation, but it is certainly possible. Many of us have seen student learners crying at the end of a manikin-based scenario.

Simulation has allowed us to more clearly identify those students who might lean toward a less empathic nature. I might not have noticed a lack of student empathy with a real patient in the past because I, as the faculty member, was there, beside the student and interacting empathetically with a patient, whether the student was capable of doing so or not. In reality, we know our students’ skills and abilities much better after a simulation than we know their abilities within the clinical setting. I became a much more astute educator after seeing my verbally skilled students say some unbelievable things to patients, during simulation.

Working in simulation, one becomes a high-fidelity educator. Admittedly, manikins provide only partial fidelity. The facilitator sets the scene, the mood, observes, diagnoses, and debriefs the scenario. If fidelity is defined as the “degree of accuracy to which a simulation, whether it is physical, mental, or both, represents a given frame of reality in terms of cues and stimuli, and permissible action” (Tun, Alinier, Tang, & Kneebone, 2015 p. 164), it is the educator (facilitator) who orchestrates this fidelity and brings it home, during the debriefing. Students missing opportunities to develop or demonstrate empathetic communication skills can be debriefed in a simulation setting and can try it again, preparing for real patients and families. Arguably, the best clinical educators today are those who work in both simulation and the clinical setting. They are true high-fidelity educators.”

Featured Articles in This Edition:

  • Utilization of the Simulation Environment to Practice Teach-Back With Kidney Transplant Patients – Kara Mangold
  • Acting With a Purpose: The Lived Experience of Actors in the Role of Standardized Patients Portraying Mental Illness – Judith M. Jarosinski, Debra A. Webster
  • Generalizability Theory: An Introduction With Application to Simulation Evaluation – Susan K. Prion, Gregory E. Gilbert, Katie A. Haerling
  • Nursing and Social Work Trauma Simulation: Exploring an Interprofessional Approach – Sara J. Manning, David M. Skiff, Lizette P. Santiago, Andrew Irish
  • Logistical Planning and Making the Move to a New Simulation Space – Jan Barber, Ashley Eberhardt, Brooklyn Kennedy, Suzie Kardong-Edgren
  • Making Sense of Methods and Measurement: Lawshe’s Content Validity Index – Gregory E. Gilbert, Susan Prion

Read the latest edition on the Clinical Simulation in Nursing Website!

Canadian Simulationists Breathe Life Into Training Manikins

Simulationists breathe life into training manikins

The press coverage of healthcare simulation continues to catch the public’s attention at facilities across the world! Recently this awesome article covered the work of Canadian-based Fanshawe College nursing simulations, and the connection to Ontario’s SIM-One group:

Fanshawe nursing students work with a simulator to hook up a colonoscopy bag. Christine Link sits inside a small room with two-way glass, watching a young woman in the classroom beyond. The nursing student seems unsure what to do with an elderly male patient in the bed in front of her. She lingers by the supply cart, as if looking for something. Link speaks through a microphone, which comes out of the manikin as a scratchy, old-man’s voice. She is playing the role of George, a grumpy senior with a respiratory condition. “Get me a drink of water,” commands Link. George has dirty tissues filled with fake mucus scattered around him. As the student fetches a cup, Link explains that she is waiting for the perfect teaching moment. “I would have the student hold it up to my mouth, and that’s when I’d cough.”

Link is one of a growing number of simulation experts working in medical, paramedic and nursing programs across the country. “Health care has really come a long way in how we teach and present material,” she says. “No longer are we injecting into an orange.” Link, who graduated from the practical nursing program at Fanshawe College in 2007, returned to the Ontario school as a part-time lab technician the following year. After stints as an instructor, in 2013 she became the simulation technologist, now responsible for running 15 manikins.

At SIM-one in Toronto, a non-profit, national networking, training and R&D organization with 1,700 members involved in health-care simulation, CEO Timothy Willett says every college and university in the country has adopted the technique. In Ontario alone, 78 different programs and labs are using a total of 1,236 manikins and thousands more simulation tools.

SIM-one offers several online and in-person courses, including the brand-new 12-week Simulation Scenario Writing, Roleplay Theatre and Simulation Wizardry. They also train experienced simulationists to run their own courses, and each year about 15 to 20 are certified as simulation educators after they have completed three courses at a total cost of about $2,000. “As far as I know, there’s no kind of college programs you can go to with the intent of getting into that role,” says Willett.


Supported Organization:


Poverty Simulation Helps Shape Future Healthcare Professionals

poverty simulation

Has your nursing program considered running a poverty simulation? Help your healthcare learners not only see the benefits of simulation outside the lab context, but also better understand the difficulties faced by less fortunate members of your community. Here’s how NDSU is using simulation to teach their nursing students about poverty:

Students at the NDSU School of Nursing at Sanford Health in Bismarck will get a glimpse into how a family in poverty navigates the complexities of life. More than 60 senior nursing students are scheduled to take part in a poverty simulation experience at Bismarck State College.

During the simulation, the nursing students will role-play the lives of low-income families, from single parents trying to care for their children to senior citizens trying to maintain their self-sufficiency on Social Security. The task of each family is to provide food, shelter and other basic necessities while interacting with various community resources.

Brittney Mueller, simulation coordinator at NDSU School of Nursing at Sanford Health, said the goal is to enable participants to view poverty from different angles and begin to understand what life is like with a shortage of money over an extended period of time. “As nurses embark on their careers, they will one day work with patients facing difficult decisions on a regular basis,” said Mueller. “Deciding whether to buy food or pay for health care is something that some people may face on a monthly basis.

Collaborative Simulation Program Development – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 1

expanding a medical simulation program

Last week we announced that the highly praised HealthySimAdmin video series is being made publicly available for the first time. Today we post Part 1: Collaborative simulation program development, across institutions and disciplines, which you can watch below:

Imagine splitting the cost of a brand new simulation center and operational program in thirds, while simultaneously increasing access to equipment, space and staff support. Now also consider the benefits of partnering with other healthcare professional disciplines to further breakdown the traditional educational training silos through your simulation program. Dean Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN from UNLV’s Nursing and Allied Health Programs will launch our discussion into how to develop a multi-disciplinary multi-institutional collaborative simulation center. Dean Yucha spent three years leading the development of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas, which supports the clinical education of three distinct institutions across a multitude of disciplines. Following Dean Yucha’s presentation, the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts will continue the discussion of related topics such as stakeholder identification and board/committee needs, types of umbrella administrative structures, architectural design considerations, financial reimbursement systems, building and program support services, legal requirements, ongoing collaborative issues and more. Funding models will be touched upon briefly but will be explored in greater depth during subsequent sessions. Audience question and answer sessions will follow the lecture and panel discussion. In summary, in this session we will learn how to build and continue a successful collaborative partnership for a medical simulation program.

About the Presenter

Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN is Dean of the School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She was a developer of the CSCLV and serves on its Advisory Committee. Dr. Yucha earned her academic credentials from the State University of New York system: her BS in Nursing from the University at Albany, her MS in Nursing from the University at Buffalo, and her PhD in Physiology from Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse NY. She worked at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the University of Florida before moving to Las Vegas. Dr. Yucha has received research funding from the National Institutes of Health, has published numerous articles, and is editor of a scientific journal, Biological Research for Journal.

Dr. Yucha was instrumental in creating the original concept of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. She worked with architects to design the space and worked closely with other Deans to develop the curriculum, staffing, and financial model to sustain the center. She serves on the Advisory Committee for the CSCLV.

Want to watch all HealthySimAdmin videos immediately?
Subscribe to HealthySim’s free monthly newsletter & get the password to the videos right away!

INACSL’s Latest Simulation in Nursing Journal Highlights Standardized Patients

nursing simulation journal

Suzie Kardong-Edgren, Director of the RISE Center at Robert Morris University, Drexel Faculty member, and INACSL Simulation in Nursing Journal editor recently shared “Standardized Patients have been a part of health professional education for over 50 years now. As an educational field that continues to grow in scholarship and practice, the editors of Clinical Simulation in Nursing feel the time is right to dedicate a special issue to examining ongoing contributions, share best practices and honour debates within the live simulation field relevant to its practitioners and health professional educators more broadly.”

INACL invites health professionals who are engaging standardized patients (SPs) in simulation education to submit manuscripts for a special issue to be published in July 2017.

Nancy McNaughton, M.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Director, Standardized Patient Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto and Mindi Anderson, PhD, ARNP, CPNP-PC, CNE, CHSE-A, ANEF, University of Central Florida College of Nursing will serve as the guest editors for this special issue.

When submitting manuscripts for this special issue, please select “special issue” when the choices appear.

Clinical Simulation in Nursing is the flagship journal of the International Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning. The journal provides a forum for research, innovation, review, and debate in simulation. The journal is dedicated to the advancement of simulation as an educational strategy to improve patient care. A double blind peer-review process is used for all submissions.

Manuscripts for consideration should be submitted to Clinical Simulation in Nursing (www.nursingsimulation.org) by 15 February, 2017.

Not Too Late! June INACSL Nursing Simulation Conference June 15th

nursing sim conference

INACSL always puts together a great nursing simulation conference and we can’t wait to hear the report about this year’s annual event taking place June 15-18th in Grapevine Texas. It’s not too late to sign up for this annual event!

Why attend the INACSL Conference:

International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) is nursing’s portal to the world of clinical simulation pedagogy and learning environments. The INACSL conference is the leading forum for nurse educators (academic and clinical), managers and researchers to connect in person with their community of practice for simulation.

The annual conference is the ideal environment to gain current knowledge regarding the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: Simulation, patient care skill acquisition, simulation lab management and the latest methodologies using simulation to enhance the education of trainees and/or practitioners. The annual conference provides an opportunity to network and share knowledge and skills to further the science of simulation alongside simulation leaders, educators, researchers and industry partners from around the world.

  • Experience the newest innovations in nursing simulation and learning resources while you re-visit some tried-and-true methodologies.
  • Explore future simulation opportunities using EvidenceBased Practice.
  • Determine new directions for simulation and learning resource centers.
  • Explore strategies to integrate technology into curriculum and practice.
  • Examine the challenges of managing nursing simulation/ learning resource centers. • Network with colleagues and experts.

Learn more at the INACSL 2016 Event website today!

MedicCast Podcast Explores Healthcare Simulation Industry

ems podcast

Recently the famous MedicCast podcast provided an update of the growth of the healthcare simulation industry, and need for specialized simulation training for EMS programs integrating these technologies. Check out this awesome podcast and then learn more about the ProMed Podcast network which also covers Nursing, Disaster Response, and other key healthcare areas.

Listen to the MedicCast Simulation Podcast here:

EMS Tip of the Week: SimGHOSTS Help Educators Simulate Medical Care

According to conservative estimates, more than 440,000 patients die each year from medical errors in the United States alone, and millions more suffer associated injuries. Thankfully, emerging healthcare education simulation programs around the world are addressing this very issue through advances in modern technology. In these sim labs, new students and recertifying professionals enter realistic patient care environments that house high-fidelity, life-like patient manikins that speak, breathe, and react to medications.

In this episode I have Lance Baily on from SimGHOSTS and HealthySimulation. The Gathering of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose goal is to provide the technical and operational training support required by individuals and institutions around the United States and the World that are improving patient care outcomes by educating healthcare professionals via advanced simulated learning environments.

About MedicCast, Part of the ProMed Network 

ProMed Network’s affiliated healthcare online radio and video programming are among the most authoritative sources of their kind worldwide. The live and recorded shows are all dedicated to the improvement of patient care in the prehospital setting. The leading online health and medical podcast network, the ProMed Network shows meet the needs of the healthcare professionals with health related news, commentary, conference coverage, clinical articles, product reviews and more. The ProMed Network is a collection of the top medical and health internet programs produced by independent medical professionals in a variety of fields.

These internet radio and TV shows are commonly known as podcasts. The ProMed Network programs include over 45 programs in fields including medical school, nursing, psychology, virology, emergency medical services, disaster preparedness, and neurology. ProMed Network shows reach 100,000+ health care professionals monthly. The shows comprise some of the top programs in the medical podcasting space. The EMS Programs on the network include programs like:

  • The MedicCast (News, commentary, and tips for EMTs and paramedics)
  • Nursing Show (Interviews, education and news on nursing, education and patient care)
  • EMS Educast (Discussions with the leading educators in EMS and medicine)
  • Brain Science Podcast (Interviews with the leaders in neurology and brain science)
  • EMS 12-Lead Podcast (Focusing on improving cardiac care in communities worldwide)
  • DisasterPodcast.com (Focusing on disaster EMS services)
Listen to the whole podcast and learn more at MedicCast.com

Delta College Performs 6 Hour Trauma Simulation Scenario with Local Authories

long medical simulations

Recently this awesome update was shared by Lori Kloc, MSN, RN, CHSE Simulation Education Specialist at Delta College:

On April 5 Delta College brought seven healthcare disciplines together to participate in one 6-hour trauma scenario. The scenario centered around a victim of an auto accident and included trauma rescue/transport, triage, two surgical procedures, infant resuscitation, post-operative care, and rehabilitation. This scenario was important because it allowed students from various levels of education and disciplines to learn with, from, and about each other in collaborative care of two patients. Simulation is a method of active learning, where students have the opportunity to practice care in a safe setting, promoting teamwork and collaboration while reinforcing skills learned in their academic setting. The objective of simulated learning is the transfer of skills and behaviors to the clinical setting, positively impacting safe patient care.

In this simulation, Mobile Medical Response (MMR) joined the division to add their expertise as first responders for our victim. The simulation will included a mock automobile accident with trauma to a pregnant woman, two surgical procedures, emergency care for the newborn who will be born via C-section but will have sustained injury, and post-op/rehab care for the victim.

Read more on the Delta College Website

Southern California Simulation Collaborative Hosts TeleHealth Robotics and Laerdal Mini-SUN

telepresence in healthcare simulation

On Friday at Cal State LA about 50 Southern California Simulation Collaborative (SCSC) met for a day of simulation activities, starting with a presentation from CSL School of Health Lecturer Jane Hook MN RN about utilizing Telehealth robots in the simulation experience. The event was sponsored by Laerdal who helped to provide lunch for the participants.

The mobile telepresence was a product from Double Robotics device was controlled by an iPhone, which also provided the camera for the iPad like screen which represented Jane as she drove around the room. Following this the group moved to the simulation lab to watch how the telepresence robot moved into the room and engage with the simulated patient. For large rural areas, these devices will become more and more common as select medical personnel remain

The goals of the program to utilize TeleHealth were around promoting interprofessional education:

  • Allow students in different programs to participate in simulation together
  • Allow the pre-licensure student to communicate with a HCP and give report, take oders, read back, etc.
  • Incorporate telehehalth technologies.

Further reading: “Clinical applications: telenursing and medicine to monitor critical care patients”. (Trenary, K. (2007) iCare Intensive Care, Banner Healthcare, Arizone Nurse Mar2007. 60(20)p6.

Check out this case study from the Duke University School of Nursing highlighting the use of the Double Robotics telepresence mobile device.

Later in the afternoon meeting sponsor Laerdal provided a “mini” SUN, providing CEUs on various product showcases.

For more information check out these websites:

Southern California Simulation Collaborative

Double Robotics Telepresence Website

Cal State LA Nursing Simulation Center