Medical Training Magazine Interviews President of Simulab Doug Beighle Regarding Simulation & Patient Safety Industries

doug beighle healthcare training magazine

Recently our friends at Medical Training Magazine (formerly MedSim Magazine) interview Doug Beighle, President and COO of Simulab, regarding the current state of the simulation and patient safety industries. As a board member of key organizations between these industries like the Global Network for Simulation in Healthcare (GNSH), SSH, and NPSF — Doug sits in a unique position to share where the worlds of patient safety and simulation can collaborate to improve healthcare outcomes on an international level. Here below, are a few excerpts from the edition which you can read fully through the link below!

Medical Training Magazine: You are on a number of Boards and important committees at the SSIH, National Patient Safety Foundation and GNSH to name a few and you work very hard to get members of the different associations to work together to achieve common goals. Please discuss the importance of working together and what you would like to see accomplished.

Doug Beighle: At Simulab we have a very experienced management team, which gives me an opportunity to spend almost a third of my time focused on issues external to our company. Nearly five years ago we realized the Patient Safety and Medical Simulation movements were suffering from the same symptom – lack of resources. By this I mean a lack of adequate budget: allocated trainer time, learner time, and training facilities and equipment. The majority of my external work is an effort to support these movements by increasing awareness, working to break down silos, and building partnerships. Medical errors in the United States are a multi-billion dollar annual problem. Yet, two of the most powerful opportunities to reduce these errors, patient safety programs and simulation-based education are under-resourced. Bringing in a business perspective helps healthcare educators and patient safety professionals build a case to get their projects adequately funded. Ultimately, the first step towards reducing medical errors requires that educators, healthcare providers, patient safety experts, and financial officers break down their silos and work together using the same language.

MTM: How could the simulation industry help itself and the healthcare sector to improve training, patient care and results?


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DB: There are many initiatives that can help speed up the process of improving patient care. One of the highest impact possibilities is integrating the simulator and curricula into one training system. In these settings learners would use a simulator and modules to self-direct learning. These systems create the ability to easily measure a learner’s path to mastery. This process would not only reduce the cost of educational interventions, but it might increase the likelihood of retention. Additionally, without the need for an instructor to be present, scheduling periodic assessments of adherence would be easier. There are examples of this today from the Resuscitation Quality Improvement (RQI) product from Laerdal, products from SonoSim and many other virtual reality training systems.

MTM: What effect do you think the merger between the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the National Patient Safety Foundation will have on patient safety and outcomes?

DB: As a member of one of the NPSF committees I do not know the behind the scenes but everyone believes it will be a very beneficial merger. The new group will continue under the IHI name and one of its goals is to revitalize the issue of patient safety. Derek Feeley, CEO and president of IHI, will lead the combined organization and Dr. Tejal Gandhi, president and CEO of NPSF, will lead the new organization’s patient safety teams. One goal of the new group is to draw greater attention to patient safety across the care continuum and not just in hospitals. It would be beneficial if they work with industry, academia and hospitals to bring innovation to medical education and work together by having state chapters or regional chapters.

Read the full interview with Doug in the latest edition of Medical Training Magazine


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IHI and NPSF Announce Upcoming Merger During This Patient Safety Week

patient safety week

Official Press Realease from NPSF and IHI

Boston, MA, March 13, 2017 — Recognizing that patient safety is a public health issue in need of fresh, robust approaches and constant focus for health care systems today, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) announce plans for a merger, effective May 1.

Derek Feeley, president of IHI, and Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, president and CEO of NPSF, talk about the merger of their organizations. IHI President and CEO, Derek Feeley, who will lead the combined organization, says now is the perfect time for the two organizations to join forces to help reset and reenergize the patient safety agenda, building on a mutual history of helping health care systems gain the knowledge and skills to implement harm reduction across the entire continuum of care. “Improving patient safety has always been central to IHI’s mission of improving health and health care quality,” said Feeley. “Yet safety now competes for attention and resources with other important issues such as value-driven care and population health. By joining forces, IHI and NPSF will be more effective in helping leaders and frontline clinicians meet all of today’s challenges while ensuring that patient safety remains a priority along the way.” Feeley added, “The entire IHI staff is thrilled about the opportunity to work with the talented staff of NPSF as one, strengthened organization.”

Tejal K. Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, NPSF President and CEO, says she and NPSF staff are equally excited about the merger. She sees it as a game-changing opportunity for the patient safety field. “NPSF and IHI each have a history of raising awareness around patient safety issues and educating the health care workforce about best practices,” Gandhi said. “Our programs are distinct but highly compatible, and we share experience, expertise, and a common goal of accelerating patient safety improvement. NPSF has provided critical thought leadership with the aim of establishing safety as a core value in health care, and IHI has demonstrated an ability to influence large-scale, global change. This merger promises to strengthen our ability to advance progress in patient safety in the coming years.”

The merger involves significant new investment from IHI in patient safety. The merged patient safety teams, to be led by Gandhi, will combine existing NPSF and IHI patient safety programs and reflect an enhanced commitment to achieve patient safety around the world. All NPSF programs, including the NPSF Lucian Leape Institute and the Certified Professional in Patient Safety credentialing program, will continue.

A Call to Action During Patient Safety Week

The merger announcement comes at the start of Patient Safety Awareness Week, a highlight of the NPSF United for Patient Safety campaign. Coupled with news of the merger, and with endorsement of IHI, NPSF is releasing Call to Action: Preventable Health Care Harm Is a Public Health Crisis and Patient Safety Requires a Coordinated Public Health Response. This document outlines how a public health framework can bring about widespread advances in patient safety and provides specific recommendations for how it can be used to reduce harm to patients and the workforce. The Call to Action was created by the NPSF Board of Advisors and Board of Directors, made up of more than 40 experts in patient safety, patient advocates, industry representatives, and other key constituents.

“We believe that in order to make meaningful and sustained improvement in patient safety, we need to address it within a public health framework,” said Gandhi. “The Call to Action outlines a multipronged, ongoing approach to systematically monitor, measure, and improve patient safety across the continuum of care through partnerships and collaboration among policy makers, health care leaders, professional associations, and others.”

The Call to Action sets forth six broad categories of recommendations, ranging from a call to establish a national steering committee and a national action plan for the prevention of health care-associated harm to a call to expand or develop education, training, and resources for the health care workforce. Read the full press announcement here.

Patient Safety Week

 

The United in Patient Safety campaign culminates each year with Patient Safety Awareness Week, designed to mark a dedicated time and a platform to increase awareness about patient safety among health professionals and the public. This year, patient safety week is taking place now, March 12-18, 2017. The National Patient Safety Foundation works to bring together and engage health care professionals and patients to help spread this important message. There are a number of ways to get involved in Patient Safety Awareness Week.

Find more resources for Patient Safety Week here!

CAE Healthcare Shares Patient Safety Foundation Info Graphic

pt safety sim

CAE Healthcare covered the NPSF last week and shared this info graphic of tips to reduce patient harm established by the group:

The National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) issued a report which calls for ‘federal agencies to create a portfolio of national standard patient safety processes’ across the care continuum, and ‘to retire invalid measures that are not useful or meaningful.’

Here, above, are the eight recommendations from the National Patient Safety Foundation to achieve this goal. The full report, “Free from Harm: Accelerating Patient Safety Improvement Fifteen Years after To Err Is Human” (Boston, MA; 2015) is available online.

CAE Healthcare is a medical simulation/simulation training company with a mission to improve healthcare education and patient safety. The global leader in simulation-based healthcare training, product design and manufacture, CAE Healthcare produces patient manikins / nursing manikins; surgical simulators, ultrasound simulation trainers, and clinical simulation management solutions for customers in more than 60 countries around the world.

Read more about Patient Safety on the CAE Healthcare website


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Patient Safety Awareness Week March 13-19 Important For Sim Champs To Support!

patient safety week 2016

As healthcare simulation champions we all know that the work we do with medical simulation not only improves clinical learning outcomes but also directly affects patient safety.

Did you know that simulation can reduce life threatening patient safety issues by as much as 85%?

One representative study, published by Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, concluded that after medical residents participated in simulation training for a catheterization procedure, life-threatening patient infection rates dropped by 85% and produced an ultimate cost savings ratio of 7:1. (Cohen, E.R., et al. “Cost Savings From Reduced Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection After Simulation-Based Education for Residents in a Medical Intensive Care Unit”. Simulation In Healthcare 5.2 (April 2010): 98-102.).

This year the Patient Safety Awareness Week organized by the National Patient Safety Foundation takes place March 13-19th, and there are a number of ways that you can get engaged. First and foremost is by following them on Linkedin, @theNPSF on Twitter, and on Facebook.

The United in Patient Safety campaign culminates each year with with Patient Safety Awareness Week, designed to mark a dedicated time and a platform to increase awareness about patient safety among health professionals and the public. This year, patient safety week is March 13-19. The National Patient Safety Foundation works to bring together and engage health care professionals and patients to help spread this important message.

There are a number of ways to get involved in Patient Safety Awareness Week.

  • Wear a patient gown: Health care leaders and administrators are challenged to step into the role of the patient by wearing a patient gown to mark Patient Safety Awareness Week. “We are all patients, after all. We want leaders to demonstrate a commitment to listen to the patient’s voice and strive for patient safety and the reduction of harm.” – Tejal K. Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, president and chief executive officer of NPSF
  • Harness the power of social media: Help spread the word on Facebook and Twitter, using these helpful sample posts (or create your own).
  • Utilize campaign materials: Various downloadable materials are available, as well items that can be ordered to help mark Patient Safety Awareness Week.
  • Register on this campaign site: Stay connected and informed about Patient Safety Awareness Week activities.
  • Join the discussion: Learn what others are doing for Patient Safety Awareness Week and share your ideas and activities to inspire others.

There are also more ways that both Healthcare consumers and healthcare providers can get engaged, all of which is linked on…

The NPSF Patient Safety Awareness Week webpage!

 

Professional Learning Series Webcasts from the National Patient Safety Foundation

 

In celebration of our attendance tomorrow at that National Patient Safety Summit today we are sharing about the Professional Learning Series Webcasts from the National Patient Safety Foundation.

The NPSF Professional Learning Series offers the convenience of continuing education and peer-to-peer collaboration in an online learning environment. Members of the American Society of Professionals in Patient Safety (ASPPS) may register for their individual participation in a webcast at the member rate of only $20. Stand Up for Patient Safety member organizations receive complimentary registration for webcasts for their teams. As of January 2016, the cost of attendance for nonmembers has been reduced to $99

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Free from Harm: Accelerating Patient Safety Improvement
Tuesday, January 26, 2016 | 2:00 – 3:00 pm Eastern Time
Complimentary webcast: open to all at no charge

During this webcast, the co-chairs of an expert panel convened by NPSF will discuss the panel’s recommendations for future work in patient safety, recently published in the report Free from Harm: Accelerating Patient Safety Fifteen Years after To Err Is Human.

Featured speakers
Donald M. Berwick, MD, MPP
President Emeritus and Senior Fellow, Institute for Healthcare Improvement
Lecturer, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

Kaveh G. Shojania, MD
Director, Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, University of Toronto
Editor-in-Chief, BMJ Quality & Safety

Moderator
Tejal K. Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS
President and CEO, National Patient Safety Foundation
President and CEO, NPSF Lucian Leape Institute

Registration will open soon. Please check back here.
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Evaluation of Perioperative Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events
Thursday, February 25, 2016 | 2:00 – 3:00 pm Eastern Time

Featured speaker
Karen C. Nanji, MD, MPH
Anesthesiologist, Massachusetts General Hospital

In this webcast, Dr. Nanji, lead investigator of a recent study on this topic, will discuss her team’s findings. Read the paper published in Anesthesiology.

Registration will open soon. Please check back here.
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Learn more at the NPSF website today!


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Report of an Expert Panel Convened by the National Patient Safety Foundation

to-err-is-human-update

In order to continue the growth of healthcare simulation utilization, our community must further connect with resources from Patient Safety organizations, like the NPSF. This powerful organization just released a report by an expert panel discussion assessing the state of healthcare on the 15th anniversary of “To err is human” — a critical report that outlined the number of patient deaths attributed to medical error. The number has since grown to as many as 440,000 patients a year in the US alone! How can we better connect healthcare simulation learning opportunities to better patient outcomes?

About the report:

Fifteen years after the Institute of Medicine brought public attention to the issue of medical errors and adverse events, patient safety concerns remain a serious public health issue that must be tackled with a more pervasive response.

With a grant from AIG, the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) convened an expert panel in February 2015 to assess the state of the patient safety field and set the stage for the next 15 years of work.

The resulting report calls for the establishment of a total systems approach and a culture of safety, and calls for action by government, regulators, health professionals, and others to place higher priority on patient safety science and implementation.

The report makes eight recommendations:

  1. Ensure that leaders establish and sustain a safety culture
  2. Create centralized and coordinated oversight of patient safety
  3. Create a common set of safety metrics that reflect meaningful outcomes
  4. Increase funding for research in patient safety and implementation science
  5. Address safety across the entire care continuum
  6. Support the health care workforce
  7. Partner with patients and families for the safest care
  8. Ensure that technology is safe and optimized to improve patient safety

Download the full report for free at NPSF.org!

TODAY & This Week: Watch NPSF Live Interviews With Laerdal

pt safety congress live stream

Join Laerdal Medical LIVE from the National Patient Safety Congress, Booth 517/519, and listen to interviews with industry experts on their experiences in improving patient safety. Can’t make it to Austin? Good news. You can see live interviews with subject matter experts via your computer or mobile device with LiveStream. All their broadcasted sessions will be recorded and available for viewing after the live event concludes.

Themes and Topics Throughout the Week will include:
• The Impact of Patient Safety Culture
• How Hospitals Can Improve Patient Safety Through Simulation
• The Use of Story Telling in Improving Patient Safety
• Using Simulation to Identify Root Cause
• Patient Hand-Offs
• Using Simulation to Reduce Risk during Labor and Delivery

Join Laerdal at NPSF as they broadcast LIVE on the the next following days:

Wednesday, April 29, 2015
4:15pm – 6:30pm CST

Thursday, April 30, 2015
12:00pm – 1:30pm CST 4:15pm – 6:30pm CST

Friday, May 1, 2015
12:00pm – 1:30pm CST

Watch Live at the Laerdal NPSF Website & Follow @theNPSF for updates!


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17th Annual National Patient Safety Congress Launches Early-Bird Registration

patient-safety-congress

Announced today was the launch of early-bird registration fro the 17th Annual NPSF Patient Safety Congress taking place Wednesday, April 29 – Friday, May 1, 2015 in Austin, Texas at the JW Marriott Austin.

About NPSF and Their Congeress

We envision safe health care as a network of pursuits extending throughout the continuum of care and the spectrum of stakeholders. From patients to care providers, from the front lines to the executive suite, from the patient and family advocate to the corporate solutions provider — we are all united in the goal of keeping patients and those who care for them free from harm.

Join us at the 2015 NPSF Patient Safety Congress for educational breakout sessions led by industry experts, thought-provoking keynote sessions with national thought leaders, and an engaging and interactive Learning & Simulation Center. The additional, optional Pre-Congress Day provides in-depth full- and half-day sessions on specific areas and issues in health care safety. Experience an invaluable program that will help you renew and nurture patient safety in your organization. In addition, we’ll also have more than 100 posters, 3 live and interactive medical simulations, 75 solutions providers, 2 networking receptions, daily breakfast and lunch—and more.

As the only conference dedicated solely to patient safety, the NPSF Annual Congress is a unique opportunity for practitioners, leaders, and experts around the world to come together and share their knowledge.

There are many ways to address issues in patient safety, and Congress participants explore them by attending a variety of breakout sessions, workshops, demonstrations, and plenary presentations. The NPSF Congress is noted for its Learning & Simulation Center, where attendees gain understanding of situations, reactions, and interactions through participation in interactive simulations of health care scenarios. Congress participants also gain the opportunity to network with other professionals passionate about patient safety and to share best practices. They go home armed with tools and information they can use to make a direct impact.

Join leading experts to share emerging patient safety evidence and best practices, experience interactive presentations, enhance your expertise, network with the best and brightest in the industry, and transform your organization’s patient safety efforts.

Who Should Attend

  • Patient safety, quality, and risk professionals
  • Hospital executives and board members
  • Frontline clinicians, including nurses, physicians, and pharmacists
  • Patient advocates, payors, researchers, and policy setters
  • All those united in safety across the continuum

Read more details on the NPSF Website & Register Online Now and Save $200!

NPSF President Interviewed by AHRQ & Prepares for May Patient Safety Congress

patient safety foundation

The AHRQ, aka the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, had Web M&M editor Dr. Robert Wachter sit down with Dr. Tejal K. Gandhi to discuss the National Patient Safety Foundation and the organization’s evolving role in enhancing healthcare safety at a national level.

What is the NPSF? The National Patient Safety Foundation’s vision is to create a world where patients and those who care for them are free from harm. A central voice for patient safety since 1997, NPSF partners with patients and families, the health care community, and key stakeholders to advance patient safety and health care workforce safety and disseminate strategies to prevent harm. NPSF is an independent, not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

Before we get to the interview snippet, remember that NPSF is holding its 16th annual Patient Safety Congress this May 14th-16th at the Renaissance Orlando at Seaworld. Simulation continues to increase its presence at this event, and here is a full day pre-conference workshop I found on the topic taking place May 14th:

Pre-Congress Session
Wednesday, May 14, 2014 | 8:00 AM–4:00 pm

Continuing Education for this Program
6.5 contact hours for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, health care risk managers, health care quality professionals, and health care executives

This interactive, multidisciplinary session will push the boundaries of traditional health care simulation programs. During the first part of the program, participants will look closely at the spectrum of simulation, experience live demonstrations, help write patient safety simulation scenarios, and participate in hands-on opportunities with simulation equipment. During the second part of the program, participants in the patients and families session will join the group for a joint learning opportunity. Simulation experts and patient and family representatives will work together to provide attendees opportunities to examine ways in which patients and families, who are integral parts of the health care team, can provide perspective and knowledge not always gained through the use of traditional health care simulation programs. This session will incorporate the patient and family perspective, and participants will have opportunities to identify and apply ways to improve the patient experience and improve the safety of their organization. Take-home tools will be provided.

nps congress


I have excerpted some of the interview text for you below, but you can read the full interview on the AHRQ website linked at the bottom of this post. (You can also listen to a portion of the interview here).

RW: Much of what NPSF does is education and convening. Is the new technological world that we find ourselves in—the world of MOOCs and videos—changing the nature of how you think about getting people together and working collaboratively across time and space?

TG: This is an area that we’re just starting to explore. We, and I think other organizations, have found that it’s harder to get people to travel to meetings. Even though the one-on-one networking at meetings is really valuable, given financial and time constraints, this is a challenge for many organizations. I think we are going to be much more engaged in other forms of convening technology and best practice sharing technologies. We’ve done webinars, but in the next year or two we will be exploring other ways to try to convene folks that doesn’t involve face-to-face interaction.

RW: You’ve been one of the leading experts in the role of information technology (IT) in patient safety. We’ve gone from 10% IT in American hospitals and clinics to probably 60% to 70% in a few years because of Meaningful Use incentives. How has that changed the environment for safety generally and then NPSF specifically?

TG: I’m a firm believer that health information technology can improve the safety of the care we deliver. This rapid transition is a good thing. We’re getting over that adoption hump and getting into these new systems, which have great potential to improve care. The challenge is that often the systems are not necessarily implemented to optimize safety and quality for a variety of reasons, whether it’s workflow or poor design. But there are many reasons why I don’t think we’re maximizing the benefits of health IT. Another big issue—it often feels like every implementation is standalone, where every hospital or clinic is trying to decide which way is the best way to do things. Best practices around how to implement are starting to come out but are still quite rudimentary.

Many decisions are made in implementation that have big impacts on quality and safety, but they are decided in one-off situations instead of having a standard for how we should be implementing to optimize quality and safety. A concrete example is around drug interactions. Which ones should we show or not show to optimize the benefits while minimizing over-alerting? It’s a decision that every place makes on its own. It strikes me that there should be a standard for something like that, but also there’s all this work happening at each site that could be avoided if there was a best practice around this. Another example is around medication lists: who can touch them, how should they be kept accurate, what should a specialist do versus a primary care doctor? I know places are spending days, weeks, months, and years trying to figure this out. Is there a way to get some best practice standards out there to help people optimize these things? Because having an accurate medication list is such a fundamental component to delivering safe care, yet we really struggle with it. I feel like the role of the National Patient Safety Foundation is to use our convening function to create some of these best practices around health IT implementation, for example.


Learn more about the AHRQ and their TEAMSTEPPS Communication tools for healthcare educators.

Learn more about the NPSF, and their May Patient Safety Congress!

National Patient Safety Congress Abstracts Due Oct. 31st!

The NPSF Congress is taking place May 14-16th 2014 in Orlando, FL!

national patient safety congress

What is the NPSF Congress?

“The NPSF Patient Safety Congress is the only global meeting where patient safety is the touch point to every session, every speaker, and every event.

Planned by leaders in the field, the NPSF Patient Safety Congress has a tradition of providing real-world tools, robust resources, and evidence-based solutions to patient safety issues. That’s why it is recognized as the foremost learning and networking event for those committed to advancing the cause of patient safety across the continuum of care.

This program delivers educational breakout sessions led by industry experts, thought-provoking plenary sessions with national thought leaders, and an engaging and interactive Learning & Simulation Center. An optional full day of in-depth Pre-Congress sessions is also offered for those seeking a deep dive into major issues in patient safety.” Learn more by visiting the NPSF Congress Website.

Obviously Medical Simulation has a direct implication to patient safety as increased training can reduce medical errors and save on costs. Read how Simulab simulator training products have been proven to reduce infections and hospital costs at a rate of 7:1!

Abstracts are due October 31st and are requested in five key areas:

  1. Track 1. Safety Event Identification, Analysis, and Feedback
  2. Track 2. Teamwork and Communication
  3. Track 3. Operationalizing Joy & Meaning and Patient Engagement
  4. Track 4. Safety across the Continuum of Care
  5. Track 5. Safety Best Practices

Submit your proposal today at the NPSF Congress 2014 Abstract Website!