New Medical Simulation Programs Get Covered in the News

simulation attention press media

Here are recap of recent news updates covering some new simulation programs across the United States and the UK:



  • Parkview Introduces Mobile Medical Simulation LabThanks to the Wabash Fire Department, which donated the ambulance late last year after upgrading its fleet, the ambulance will serve as a mobile simulation lab to provide a more realistic training experience to community hospitals and first responders. “The mobile lab will operate just as a lab in the Mirro Center would, and just as importantly, it gives us the mobility to take our training to other Parkview facilities and beyond,” said Rebecca Jensen, simulation lab manager, Parkview Mirro Center for Research and Innovation. “When we conduct off-site training, we often have to bring a lot of equipment along with us, in addition to large mannequins. We now have room to easily transport all our equipment, and we are extremely grateful to the Wabash Fire Department for giving us that flexibility.”
  • NOLA’s LSU Med Students Learn How to Save Your LifeWe can put the students into a situation where they can make mistakes, and we have people there who can correct them in their techniques and procedures,” said Dr. Richard DiCarlo, associate dean for undergraduate education. DiCarlo was largely responsible for integrating simulation into the School of Medicine’s curriculum. The technology allows students to engage in hands-on learning before they might be fully equipped to touch a living patient. In their first two years at LSU, each of the 200 medical students per class interact with the simulators on numerous occasions to learn 40 different procedural skills.

  • USC Students get Real-world Medical Experience with ‘Sim Man’The patient presented all of the usual symptoms of a heart attack for a 50-year-old male with shortness of breath, excruciating pain and the feeling of a heavy weight crushing his chest. But Denny, lying on a gurney at the front of a classroom in Upper St. Clair High School, was never in any real danger. The high-fidelity human simulator mannequin is designed to teach the students of Laura Marks’ honors organic chemistry class about the role of a pharmacist in an emergency.

  • Robot Patients Help Guide Youngsters Into Medical CareersStudents considering careers in medicine have been given an invaluable insight into life in a hospital with the help of robotic “patients”. The youngsters from schools and colleges throughout County Durham and Darlington spent the day in a purpose-built training ward at Bishop Auckland General Hospital, discussing their ambitions with doctors and careers advisers. They even had the chance to practice on life-sized talking mannequins in the hospital’s pioneering clinical simulation centre.

Is your medical simulation program getting enough media attention? Such attention can attract new learners to your institution, bring in anonymous donors, and better educate the public about the important role your center plays in modern healthcare training.

Read our comprehensive guide to “Start the Presses: How to get Media Attention to Your Healthcare Simulation Program” to learn more!


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Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond Books and Train in New $1M Healthcare Simulation Center

Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond the Books, Train in Simulation CenterAnother article showcasing how the media can cover your simulation program! Read our tutorial on how to gather such public attention for your simulation program here!

Nursing students at the Hibbing Community College (HCC) are stepping out of the classroom, into a realistic hospital room setting and learning how to treat patients in life and death situations. The newly remodeled HCC Healthcare Simulation Center opened this semester and is transforming the way students train. The state-of-the art simulation allows the students to go beyond the book and gain real-life experience that comes without the risk of working on real people.

“Students can come in and practice clinical with patients from birth all the way up to death, and they can do it in a safe environment,” explained Sandy Gustafson, nursing program director at HCC. “They can actually do the hands-on care in critical or unusual situations that they wouldn’t get in a facility that’s in a rural area.” The mannequins talk, breath, blink, cough, puke and bleed like a real human would. One of the female robots even gives birth.

“We can assess them in a way that’s different than just learning from a book because we’re just pretending there,” said Brandy Mass, a first-year nursing student. “If you don’t have that experience behind you with the simulation, then you risk the chance of freezing or not knowing what to do or drawing a blank,” said Ashton Martin, a first-year nursing student. “This prevents us from feeling that nervousness.”

Inova Fairfax Simulation Center Helps Doctors Actually Practice Medicine

Inova Fairfax Helps Doctors Actually Practice Medicine

NBC Washington reports on a new program at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia is giving the term “practicing medicine” a new meaning:

The Inova Center for Advanced Medical Simulation is an effort to keep doctors, nurses and medical students engaged both with the latest in medical techniques as well as some of the more usual challenges in medicine. “It is a laboratory for our physicians and nurses, students, any health care professional to train, whether they’re new or whether they’re a seasoned clinician,” said Director Dr. Craig Cheifitz, who helped develop the center.

The center has 14 rooms, including an operating room, and state-of-the-art technology. “We do have very high tech mannequins, which have the ability to bleed – artificial blood, of course — voice files, can even change their vitals,” Cheifitz said.

Health care professionals work in teams and deal with everything from infectious diseases to head wounds to complicated births. The exercises are done in real time, and the center is frequently at capacity, Cheifitz said. It’s one of seven medical simulation centers in Virginia.“Medical education for years has been such that after you graduate, you might learn more from a textbook or a conference,” Cheifitz said.


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ABC Covers Hillsborough Community College’s New Simulation Suite

medical simulation news story

Check out this local news story from ABC about the The  which has just created a “Simulation Suite.” The new lab is designed to look and feel like a real hospital, and gives students the chance to perform medical produces and diagnoses on dummy patients.

Hillsborough Community College (HCC) is now home to a fully functional, state-of-the-art health sciences simulation suite. Designed to simulate a hospital setting, the HCC simulation suite allows students to apply classroom concepts within a simulated clinical environment. Florida’s aging population is growing and so is the demand for the healthcare professionals who care for them. The simulation suite is currently being used to train respiratory, EMS and nursing students.

The students use life-sized, anatomically correct manikins in a number of settings to simulate a number of situations including, but not limited to, trauma with bleeding, childbirth and chest pain with cardiac arrest. According to the Florida Center for Nursing, “Statewide estimates for vacant nurse positions in the industries studied have increased since the 2013 survey with nearly 12,500 vacant RN positions, 2,654 vacant LPN positions, and 3,111 vacant CNA positions as of June 30, 2015.” This simulation suite will help train and prepare the next generation of professionals to provide care for patients.

“I can practice this and the mannequin is not going to judge me,” said Molly Gonzalez with a smile. On Wednesday, Gonzalez and her classmates got to use the lab for the first time since it was completed this summer. These kinds of labs are a popular training tool for colleges across the country, so if the HCC’s students were going to compete, the school needed to upgrade. Having the simulation lab now allows these students to get quality EMS and nursing education at community college prices. And gets them to working in this in-demand field very quickly.

Learn How to Gain Similar Media Attention for Your Sim Lab!

Peak TV Show Covers St. Luke’s University Health Network Simulation Medical School

simulation center interview

Medical simulation helps bridge the gap between classroom learning and real-life hands on experience for medical students. Joining us in the studio is Dr. Joel Rosenfeld, Chief Academic Officer for Temple University Medical School at St. Luke’s.

The PEAK is the Greater Lehigh Valley’s PREMIER lifestyle show featuring the latest medical news, personal fitness, healthy cooking and eating, exciting places and trends, and giving back in our community! If it’s innovative, informative, and fun — you’ll find it on The PEAK!

About St. Luke’s Simulation Center

State-of-the-art clinical simulation centers, located at both the Philadelphia North Broad Street and the Bethlehem St. Luke’s campuses, provide students with outstanding opportunities to develop their clinical and procedural skills. These centers include both robotic simulators and standardized patients as well as a variety of procedural skills training equipment. High fidelity, programmable robotic simulators imitate physiologic and clinical scenarios that clinicians may encounter. Small groups of students work together to assess the “patient’s” problem and to develop and implement a management plan.

A faculty member observes the group, then debriefs the students about the encounter to develop their skills for future encounters with patients. Students develop their history-taking and physical examination skills and professional behaviors through sessions with standardized patients and patient instructors. The opportunity to work first with standardized patients (who simulate real medical cases) helps to build students’ confidence towards the time when they will encounter real patients. Life-like task trainers (arms, head/neck, torsos, and other portions of the body) allow students to build their skills in performing a range of procedures such as phlebotomy, airway management, suturing, and urinary catheterization.

Students interested in surgery may begin to develop basic surgical skills during their preclinical years by participating in surgical interest groups and electives.

Learn How to Gain Media Attention for Your Sim Lab!

Hull Institute of Learning and Simulation Featured on ITN Show ‘Doctors of the Future’

hull institute of learning and simulation

Check out this awesome ITN (UK’s Independent Television Network) interview of the Hull Institute of Learning and Simulation Center! Healthcare professionals are using simulation training at the Hull Institute of Learning and Simulation to continue their professional development, improving patient care. This video is part of the Royal Society of Medicine’s news-style programme ‘Doctors of the Future’, produced in partnership with ITN Productions.

About Doctors of the Future

In a unique communications partnership, the Royal Society of Medicine and ITN Productions have launched a news and current affairs-style programme. ‘Doctors of the Future’ looks at the transformations in medical education as well as innovations in medical research and technologies that will shape the healthcare of tomorrow.

The programme premiered at the 12th Medical Innovations Summit on Saturday 16th April 2016 at The Royal Society of Medicine. Watch the reaction to the programme here. Introduced by national newsreader Natasha Kaplinsky, the programme features key industry interviews and news-style reports, along with sponsored editorial profiles of some of the leading organisations in the sector.

Learn more about the Hull Simulation Center here and
Watch the full Doctors of the Future Program here! 

15 News Articles Relevant to Medical Simulation

15 medical simulation articles

Sim Champs! Here are 15 news articles relevant to the expansion of medical simulation around the world:

  1. Gainsville Sun – UF’s patient simulator breathes, reacts like the real thing
  2. Becker’s Hospital Review – The chronic problem of communication: Why it’s a patient safety issue, and how hospitals can address it
  3. Association for Talent Development – Simulations: Safe Way to Move Caregivers From Training to Treatment
  4. Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System – Patient safety no dummy at Naval Hospital Bremerton
  5. Harvard Gazette – “Real as a heart attack, almost”, Acted-out medical conditions formative for future physicians
  6. Japan Times – Simulated patients pitch Japan’s medical students cultural curve balls
  7. Health Data Management – Getting a glimpse of virtual and augmented reality in healthcare
  8. McGill University News – Getting serious with serious games in health professionals’
  9. Statesmen News – Simulation lab trains Pflugerville Fire staff for fires big, small
  10. Healio News – Surgical simulation-based training in arthroscopy: An emerging paradigm shift
  11. Michigan Daily – Patient simulator use expanded at School of Nursing
  12. Medical Xpress – Scientists turn to 3-D printing, digital simulations to treat heart disease
  13. EMS1 News – Paramedic, nurse win simulation competition
  14. Daily Advance – Ambulance simulator helps train EMTs
  15. US News – Blended Learning Options Rise at Medical Schools

Looking to secure press to your healthcare simulation program? Read our comprehensive guide!

Times Herald Interviews Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Sean Murphy

sim tech interview(Photo: Jeffrey M. Smith, Times Herald)

Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Sean Murphy from St. Clair County Community College’s simulation center was interviewed last month about his work in our “growing field”. Check out this excerpt:

“From his seat in the glassed-in control room of St. Clair County Community College’s simulation center, Murphy manipulates computerized human stand-ins lying in hospital beds in a mock emergency ward in the next room.

At the touch of a mouse, he can make the high-fidelity dummies “breathe,” their diaphragms rising and falling. He can produce an ever-present outflow of the patient’s vital stats, forcing the student nurses to constantly monitor heart rates and blood pressure as they rush about administering I.V. fluids and life-saving medications within a critical few minutes’ time. Throughout the exercise, he and instructor-coordinator Kim Murphy observe the students’ responses that are picked up and transmitted live to control room monitors. 

Murphy said health care training using simulated patients is a growing field involving working with manufacturers and sales reps and attending conferences to stay current. Hospitals are using the training with their own employees in addition to universities, and the military uses the technology to simulate combat situations among its medical technicians.

“I see it as a growing field. It’s a new and upcoming profession, and it’s very exciting, actually,” he said.”

Read the Full Story about Sean on the Times Herald Website!

7 Useful Articles For Healthcare Champions

hand-surgery-training-tool

Today we share 7 articles that are relevant for simulation champions to consider, some of which are beyond the walls of our industry. Consider these insights:

  1. What Breathes and Bleeds but Doesn’t Suffer or Feel Pain? – Introduction to Syndaver and its synthetic tissue products (from LinkedIn)
  2. Austin lab, hospital partner to create new surgical tool – Seton Healthcare Family showed off the prototype of a new simulation task trainer that doctors are calling an innovation in the surgical suite.
  3. Train as you’re going to fight: The importance of Reality Based Training (LinkedIn)
  4. A Regional Sim Portfolio (LinkedIn) – Request to the community to create regional share hubs for simulation resources.
  5. Medical Simulation Theory: Canary In Mineshaft (LinkedIn)- Medical Simulators are often used in a similar manner to the Canary – to warn us of skills deficits in our students, or more commonly – our Teaching!
  6. Vision Disrupters: Virgin Wants to Change Education – “Experiential learning is much more likely to have an impact on young people, and is more enjoyable for both students and teachers.”
  7. The Best TED Talks of 2015 by Justin Bariso (LinkedIn) – Check out some highlight “must see” TED talks from you may have missed from 2015!

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7 Recent Medical Simulation News Articles

7 medical simulation articles

Here’s a collage of medical simulation news articles from around the world from the past month! Looking to secure press for your simulation program? Read our tutorial here on “Start the Presses – How to Get Media Attention to Your Sim Program“.

7 Latest Medical Simulation News Articles:

From Blinks to Births, Health Simulators Get RealThe Columbus Dispatch:

Throughout Hall D at the downtown San Diego Convention Center last month, these little actions brought slightly unnerved smiles to people unaccustomed to the latest level of realism in medical simulation. At the International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare, visitors could browse simulated skins stratified from newborn to senior, use an ultrasound machine to guide a needle into a disembodied knee or practice suturing with a surgical robot.

UMMS Graduate School of Nursing Adopts Opioid Conscious Curriculum in Simulation Program – UMASS Med School Now

“The initial phase of our Opioid and Safe Prescribing Training Immersion program will provide both training and assessment of our students’ skills. We have begun to design a series of required, hands-on, skills building training sessions in our cutting-edge simulation center, which is the gold standard for competency evaluation of medical students. The training, which bolsters existing classroom learning, is targeted to opioid safe prescribing and prescription drug misuse prevention and treatment,” said Michele Pugnaire, MD, senior associate dean for educational affairs and professor of family medicine & community health.

Poverty simulation helps shape future health care professionalsMedical Xpress

NDSU nursing and pharmacy students will get a glimpse into how a family in poverty navigates the complexities of life. Approximately 70 senior nursing students and third-year professional pharmacy students are scheduled to take part in a poverty simulation experience. During the simulation, the students will role-play the lives of low-income families, from single parents trying to care for their children, to senior citizens trying to maintain their self-sufficiency on Social Security. The task of each family is to provide food, shelter and other basic necessities while interacting with various community resources.

Chennai: Surgical training just got sharper with mannequin that develops ‘complications’ETHealthworld

Doctors at the SRM Medical College have been practising on a high-end simulator- a mannequin which offers realistic training in neurology, radiology, vascular surgery and cardiac surgery. Simulators are not entirely new, but doctors say advanced technology and computing have taken virtual reality to newer levels. “The new machine gives us a feel that is closer to the human body. It lets the surgeon to practise and perfect his skills before he cuts open a patient. In short, doctors will no more experiment on the patient,” said university pro-chancellor Dr K Sridhar.

Virtual reality’s promise, risk loom large for health researchersUSA Today

Helping patients overcome difficult experiences is far from the only new use of VR. The technology’s powerful impact on the brain can also be used to generate realistic levels of empathy, tangible reductions in pain and cure phobias, say researchers at Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab. In a demonstration of a diversity training simulation, the user at first appears in a virtual mirror as a white male, and then in the blink of an eye as a black female. Moments later, an animated white male is screaming obscenities. When you raise your hands in self-defense, your arms are that of a black woman. The idea is to truly feel the impact of racism, even if temporarily and virtually.

Pediatric Simulator designed to improve trainingLocal 8 Now

Tennessee Emergency Medical Services for children and East Tennessee children’s hospital are working together to improve the care children in this region receive. A special piece of technology funded by the Knox -East Tennessee healthcare coalition is making that possible. The mannequin interfaces with a computer so the instructor can change patterns like breath signs, bowel signs, and pupil area reaction. this helps them receive instant feedback on how well they’re providing care. “This simulator is different because it reacts like a real child would, and any interventions immediately show up on your screen, immediately show up on your patient assessment, says Angie Bowen Regional Coordinator.

Ambulance simulator boosts EMS programCreightonian University Publication

Creighton’s Emergency Medical Services Education, (EMS) program unveiled the completion of a state-of-the art ambulance simulator after construction during Winter Break as the program continues to look forward in health sciences and hands-on learning. The ambulance simulator cost roughly $22,000 and Kevin Carritt – the Clinical/Field Coordinator for Emergency Medical Services Education program said that the most technical part of the simulation is the information the students bring with them, using the simulator as a tool rather than being dependent on a book.

Read our tutorial here on “Start the Presses – How to Get Media Attention to Your Sim Program“!