Virtual Medical Coaching Provides VR Radiographic Simulation Training

virtual medical coaching

New Zealand based Virtual Medical Coaching has launched VR based simulated radiography training taking advantage of 3d-spacing to train medial professionals with realistic physical motion skills training requirements.

About VMC

Virtual Medical Coaching offers you the world’s first true Virtual Reality application for learning radiographic positions and principles. In the radiation free simulator, the user can perform radiographic examinations as in the real world, critique the resulting images and get instant metric feedback in a way that is impossible in conventional education. The simulator allows for unlimited training in the immersive, safe environment. In addition, our adaptive e-coaching modules move e-learning from linear training to a more sophisticated program able to adapt to learners’ needs. Combining practical skills assessment, classroom training, and e-coaching is integral to Virtual Medical Coaching’s design.


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The Benefits of Training in VR

According to Andrew Connell, CTO of Virtalis, we trap learners behind the computer screen now, so they can only touch with a mouse. “But we want people to become immersed in their 3D model; to reach in with their hands and really dig about inside a product to explore, learn about, and improve it, while also communicating with others in the organization about those products.” Virtual Medical Coaching offers that. Users are able to access and experience, in real-time, an interactive and immersive VR environment created from 3D datasets. If they want to touch the patient they reach out and do so; if they want to adjust some machinery they turn the controls with their hands. All of this, of course, in a virtual world. Numerous studies have demonstrated that close to half the students who study STEM (science, technology, engineering, and maths) subjects in school end up dropping those subjects at undergraduate level, and one of the common complaints about STEM education is it relies too heavily on theory and doesn’t provide a lot of hands-on experiences to students.

Learn more on the VMC website!


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National Youth Leadership Forum Introduces Students to Medicine Through Simulation

National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine Features Stanford-Developed Simulation

Shouldn’t all perspective students of healthcare careers experience the role through simulation? Imagine a future where students could experience the role of healthcare provider with a simulated clinical learning experience, or putting on a VR headset to see what its like to be a firefighter, nurse, or surgeon? NYLF is paving the way this year!

Students attending Envision’s summer 2017 National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine will have the unique opportunity to get hands-on experience in an emergency medical simulation, When Care is Hours Away. This dynamic workshop gives high school students an immersive experience to gain invaluable, real-life medical skills that are critical success in a future career and beyond.

The simulation was created in collaboration with wilderness medicine expert Dr. Paul Auerbach and simulation expert Dr. Rebecca Smith-Coggins, professors in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. NYLF Medicine students will learn first-hand how to care for a patient in an emergency using only the materials at hand, employing time-tested techniques that are used around the world.

“We’re proud to have some of the most well-regarded and prominent leaders, educators, and physicians in the medical community provide support to and directly participate in NYLF Medicine, speaking to student groups and designing exciting curriculum modules like this simulation,” says Andrew Potter, Chief Academic Officer at Envision. “Not all emergencies take place in hospitals, so it is crucial for students to have skills in spine precautions, tying a tourniquet, hypothermia prevention, and more.”

Held in nine U.S. cities, NYLF Medicine represents an opportunity for aspiring doctors and medical professionals to get hands-on experience and valuable insight from health care professionals that will help them succeed in their future medical studies and careers. Program attendees visit a state-of-the-art medical simulation center to train like professionals in a variety of medical procedures and technologies with guidance from experts.

Collaborative Simulation Program Development – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 1

expanding a medical simulation program

Last week we announced that the highly praised HealthySimAdmin video series is being made publicly available for the first time. Today we post Part 1: Collaborative simulation program development, across institutions and disciplines, which you can watch below:

Imagine splitting the cost of a brand new simulation center and operational program in thirds, while simultaneously increasing access to equipment, space and staff support. Now also consider the benefits of partnering with other healthcare professional disciplines to further breakdown the traditional educational training silos through your simulation program. Dean Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN from UNLV’s Nursing and Allied Health Programs will launch our discussion into how to develop a multi-disciplinary multi-institutional collaborative simulation center. Dean Yucha spent three years leading the development of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas, which supports the clinical education of three distinct institutions across a multitude of disciplines. Following Dean Yucha’s presentation, the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts will continue the discussion of related topics such as stakeholder identification and board/committee needs, types of umbrella administrative structures, architectural design considerations, financial reimbursement systems, building and program support services, legal requirements, ongoing collaborative issues and more. Funding models will be touched upon briefly but will be explored in greater depth during subsequent sessions. Audience question and answer sessions will follow the lecture and panel discussion. In summary, in this session we will learn how to build and continue a successful collaborative partnership for a medical simulation program.

About the Presenter

Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN is Dean of the School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She was a developer of the CSCLV and serves on its Advisory Committee. Dr. Yucha earned her academic credentials from the State University of New York system: her BS in Nursing from the University at Albany, her MS in Nursing from the University at Buffalo, and her PhD in Physiology from Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse NY. She worked at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the University of Florida before moving to Las Vegas. Dr. Yucha has received research funding from the National Institutes of Health, has published numerous articles, and is editor of a scientific journal, Biological Research for Journal.

Dr. Yucha was instrumental in creating the original concept of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. She worked with architects to design the space and worked closely with other Deans to develop the curriculum, staffing, and financial model to sustain the center. She serves on the Advisory Committee for the CSCLV.

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Subscribe to HealthySim’s free monthly newsletter & get the password to the videos right away!


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22nd Annual Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine Event Opens in Lisbon Portugal

sesam-2016

Today in Lisbon Portugal more than 700 healthcare simulation champions from around the world met for the 22nd annual Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM).

You can watch the event LIVE on facebook here!

The president of the Portuguese Simulation Society, the Director of the Portuguese Medical Association, and the Portuguese Administer of Health helped to introduce the event which took place at the Lisbon Conference Center near the San Francisco Bridge.

society in europe for simulation applied to medicine

SESAM President Antoine Tesniere thanked the international attendees and reminded them about the event’s opportunities to network, learn, and collaborate

Lou Oberndorf, Founder of METI, introduced the opening keynote lecture series with his name speaking to SESAM as a fellow pioneer in healthcare simulation, being one of the oldest organizations in the world dedicated to the field. “20 years after we have launched this innovative technology and now, virtually any place in the world, you could go into almost every medical school, and many of the nursing schools, and encounter simulation”. Lou challenged the audience to avoid complacency, and to constantly ask for more innovation from one another and from vendors. He then announced his honor at introducing the keynote speaker

Opening Keynote Address by Dr. Rick Satava

satava sesam 2016 Dr. Richard Satava MD FACS, Professor Emeritus of Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center spoke to the topic of “Next Generation Curriculum and Technology for Simulation”.

He focused his talk on demonstrated development and alid of curriculum competency preliminary proficiency based progression methodology using the fundamentals of robotic surgery as an exemplar.

Dr. Satava asked the audience to consider “Does this training things safer for my patient?” He shared with proficiency-based progression training to consistently meet a high level of skill now and increase that ability as learners move down the line. He then shared how his team built learning devices first through simulated animation to perfect the model before creating a physical prototype. With these prototypes, learners must prove competency with a measured qualitative experience with specific benchmarks, and are not allowed to continue onwards until each step is proven proficient.

For new technologies, Dr. Satava highlighted future laser technologies which will provide non-invasive surgeries and advances in 3d printing. He then closed by reminding us that healthcare technology is neutral, and sooner than later, humans will evolve thanks to use of these technologies.

Registered delegates will be able to watch the keynote sessions live on their mobile devices and watch the recordings after the event from the comfort of their home.

Follow the live tweets on @SESAMSimulation and
@HealthySim with the hashtag #SESAM2016!

*Afternoon Session Update:

Flinders University Professor Harry Owen published the work “Simulation in Healthcare Education”, and provided a breakdown of key historical updates including the first auscultation simulator in 1867 and various OB simulators from the 18th century! About the book: Simulation in healthcare education has a long history, yet in many ways, we have been reinventing the wheel during the last 25 years. Historically, simulators have been much more than simple models, and we can still learn from aspects of simulation used hundreds of years ago. This book gives a narrative history of the development of simulators from the early 1700s to the middle of the 20th century when simulation in healthcare appeared to all but die out.  It is organized around the development of simulation in different countries and includes at the end a guide to simulators in museums and private collections throughout the world.  The aim is to increase understanding of simulation in the professional education of healthcare providers by exploring the historical context of simulators that were developed in the past, what they looked like, how they were used, and examples of simulator use that led to significant harm and an erosion of standards. The book is addressed to the healthcare simulation community and historians of medicine. Buy it through the link below:

Advances in Simulation with Editor in Chief Debra Nestel

Professor Nestel provided an update regarding the recently launched Advances in Simulation journal which is open access, starting with an introduction to the editors of the journal and the supporting reviewer team.

Advances in Simulation Benefits to Authors:

  • SESAM’s Professional Journal
  • Open Access
  • Promotion and Press Coverage

Update from launch 15 months ago:

  • Editorial Board formation
  • Category types
  • Manuscript commissioning
  • Launched January 11 2016
  • 21 articles published
    • 13 research articles
  • Promotional activities
  • Supplements portfolio
  • Secured over 300 reviewers
  • Most accessed articles has been read more than 1700 times

Learn more about free access to Advances in Simulation here.

Afternoon Plenary from SSH President Dr. Chad Epps

Dr. Epps, Executive Director of Simulation at UTHSC and President of SSH, started his plenary with a breakdown about improv, connecting the performance style to healthcare simulation.

As a clinician, and not an educator, Chad shared how he started considering some key questions after building a training assessment criteria for his anesthesiology residents. How did he know his checklist for assessment was valid? How valid was this tool? As, perhaps a tool designed for professional ED professionals would not work that well for an academic setting with residents. And beyond that — how competent was the assessors?

Dr. Epps then shared some resources for assessment development in simulation including the Assessment Standards of Best Practice in Simulation from INACSL and the SSH Accreditation Standards in Assessment. He also recommend the book “Defining Excellence in Simulation Programs” — which you can buy below:

Learn more about Dr. Epps on LinkedIn!

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality (MMVR22) Launches in Los Angeles

mmvr 22

Today at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles the 22nd annual Medicine Meets Virtual Reality meeting launched to an international audience. HealthySim is on hand to provide updates throughout the day on our @HealthySim twitter account – and stay tuned tomorrow for a blog post covering more activities from the event. For now, learn more about MMVR below:

About MMVR

In 1992, Medicine Meets Virtual Reality first presented a daring vision of patient care and medical education transformed by computer technology. The evolving NextMed / MMVR engages researchers committed to intelligent healthcare—engineers, physicians, scientists, educators, students, industry, military, and futurists—with its creative mix of unorthodox thinking and validated investigation. Conference topics include:

    • Medical simulation and modeling
    • Data visualization and fusion
    • Virtual and augmented reality
    • Imaging devices and methods
    • Robotics, haptics, sensors
    • Human-computer interfaces
    • Data and decision networks, AI, mobile health
    • Wearable and implantable electronics
    • Projection systems
    • Learning and technology
    • Simulator design and validation
    • Physical and mental rehabilitation tools
    • Serious games
    • Surgical registration and navigation
    • Peri-operative guidance
    • Remote and battlefield care
    • Patient and public health monitoring and education

NextMed / MMVR promotes the creation and adoption of IT-enabled tools for patient care and medical education that support better precision, efficiency, and outcomes. The curriculum combines traditional assessment methods with unorthodox problem-solving to stimulate forward-thinking solutions to healthcare problems. Presentations are chosen to educate participants on:

    • Advances in simulation, modeling, and haptics that are upgrading medical education, skills  training, psychotherapy, and physical rehabilitation
    • Novel imaging, visualization, and data fusion methods that make clinical diagnosis and therapy more precise and personalized
    • Robotics and sensors that extend the caregiver’s reach and provide richer patient data
    • Medical intelligence networks that promote a collaborative healthcare environment and enhance decision-making
    • Broader goals, accomplishments, and challenges in the development and application of emerging healthcare technologies

Learn more at the Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Website!


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What Sports Performance Analysis Can Teach Healthcare Simulation

sports healthcare simulation

Last week, software company HUDL acquired Sportstec, the parent company of Studiocode — which provides a/v recording and performance analysis software for medical simulation. The software is really robust, providing a high level of detail with regards to annotating actions and exporting data for research purposes. Users can create custom one-click data entry mapping tools specific to their program needs, meaning you can change the button layout for recording performance actions for different types of of scenarios, learners, or instructors. With better tagged scenario footage, you can quickly export the specific segments you need to highlight the learning opportunities. For example, you could quickly export the three 10 second clips that exist somewhere in a one hour scenario recording. This speeds up time for facilitators and learners to witness the exact moments they need to review.

Bringing Sports Analysis to Healthcare

When our community compares medical simulation to other industries we often speak about aviation or military training. Yet the sports industry has a lot of parallels which can directly apply to our analogies, learning, and evolution. Consider that in sports team members are a constantly morphing as players start, retire, trade or have injuries. The team has a common goal against numerous different opponents who have unknown tactics. While obviously the stakes to win are not as life or death, they are still high.

In healthcare, we are constantly working with different team members against high stakes traumatic or medical cases with unknown dynamics. Thus, the tools and methods that big budget sports programs use to increase their odds of victory should be evaluated, compared, and at times adopted into healthcare. Of course, sports companies like HUDL will need to fully understand the needs of healthcare providers to ensure that the tools are designed from the ground up to better support our needs. Physical movement around a ball is less dynamic than healthcare’s movement around a patient, as opposed to verbal communication in healthcare which (hopefully) takes place more often than in sports. But with customizable coding systems, Studiocode has that potential to help us focus on our specific needs — whether that be team-based communication or an individual’s specific task evaluation.

About the Acquisition

Sportstec Managing Director Philip Jackson announced the acquisition proposal to Sportstec staff today saying, “The market has changed dramatically over the last 16 years and proudly we can claim to have driven a lot of this change. We have done extremely well in the elite sports market to be globally recognized as number one. A key area missing from the Sportstec offering is the grassroots and amateur markets where Hudl has excelled, making the combination a compelling market strategy and story. The culture and willingness to always improve will ensure the Sportstec brand continues to inspire the market.”

“This goes beyond our global growth as a company,” said Graff. “With this acquisition comes the opportunity to study how Sportstec’s top tier programs use these tools. By familiarizing ourselves with what’s analyzed in professional leagues, we can tailor the tools Hudl currently offers to amateur teams across all sports.”

Subject to all conditions, Sportstec would be Hudl’s third acquisition in 12 months. The transaction is expected to close in late June.

About Hudl
Hudl is a leading software company changing the way coaches and athletes train to stay ahead of the competition, offering video distribution, play diagrams, individual analysis and more, securely available online. More than 3.5 million users from 100,000 teams, spanning the smallest youth programs, to high schools, elite colleges and professional teams, rely on Hudl’s software to give them the competitive edge they need to succeed.

About Sportstec
Sportstec provides coaching applications and professional services to the world’s premier sporting teams. Since 1999, Sportstec has lead the performance analysis revolution with its famous SportsCode and Gamebreaker brands. Sportstec has built a global network that includes direct operations in 14 countries and a distribution network spanning another 40 countries.

And to connect all the dots, Studiocode is used by British Airways to analyze the performance of their pilots during training and recertification. Clearly the overlap between simulation industries and performance analysis is shrinking every day.

Learn more at Studiocode’s website today!

10 More Ways Virtual Reality is Revolutionizing Healthcare

medical-simulation-virtual-reality

Continuing our exploration of virtual reality today, here is a great article from TechRepublic entitled “10 ways Virtual Reality is Revolutionizing Medicine and Healthcare“. We should think of virtual reality not just in terms of what it can provide for healthcare professionals in terms of training, but also for rehabilitation and patient education.

“When people experience virtual reality for the first time, a common reaction is to start imagining all the different uses the technology might hold. Even within one industry, healthcare, the potential is open-ended. The good thing is that scientists and medical professionals have been at the drawing board for years now, developing and implementing virtual reality in ways that can help them train, diagnose, and treat in myriad situations.

Here are just ten of the use cases that are currently in practice and continually developing as the technology itself develops too:

  • Exposure therapy
  • Treatment for PTSD
  • Pain management
  • Surgical training
  • Phantom limb pain
  • Brain damage assessment and rehabilitation
  • Social cognition training for young adults with autism
  • Meditation Opportunities for the disabled
  • Opportunities for the homebound

I would add mass casualty scene management, patient assessment, ED scenarios and patient movement to the list. Here’s another list of VR’s affect in healthcare with some great videos on HuffintonPost.com:

  • Soothing Burn Victims’ Painful Therapy
  • Curing Phantom Pains In Amputee Victims
  • Therapy For Soldiers Suffering From PTSD
  • Treating Children With Autism
  • Allowing Surgical Students To Practice Techniques

 

Read the full TechRepublic article here and the HuffingtonPost Article here.

Let us know how you are using virtual reality for your healthcare programs!


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iMedicalApps.com Physicians Review Mobile Medical Technology Apps

imedicalapps

iMedicalApps provides honest reviews of all the latest medical apps for healthcare professionals, patients and analysts interested in mobile technology. Their physician editors lead a team of physicians, allied health professionals, medical trainees, and mHealth analysts in providing reviews, research, and commentary of mobile medical technology. Their publication is heavily based on our their experiences in the hospital and clinic setting.

Their work has been recognized as experts in mobile health by the New York Times, Wired Magazine, Slate Magazine, American Medical News, and many other reputable media outlets. They have also been in various medical journals, such as the Annals of Emergency Medicine, the Journal of Surgical Oncology, the Journal of Surgical Radiology, and others.

Unlike other medical review and mHealth sites, the iMedicalApps Editors do not make medical apps and institute strict conflict-of-interest policies, enabling us to provide an unbiased view of mobile medical technology.

Why Critical Reviews Are A Must for Medical Mobile Tech:
Shannon O’Hern, McNamara Emergency Medicine Resident (@shannonomac) writes a blog and is also one of the reviwers on iMedicalApps. She shares on her post “A Critical Eye on Mobile Technology in Medicine” why there is a need for such a website, that reviews are supposed to be honest and critical, and how such apps can help new and experienced medical professionals and patients learn more about healthcare:

“So why do I think it’s worthwhile to review apps? As medical education embraces new technology, I think it’s essential for us to look at new resources like mobile apps with the same critical eye that we use for evaluating traditional resources like medical textbooks and peer reviewed publications. At the same time, this is a fantastic opportunity to experiment with new ways to use technology in teaching, independent learning, and clinical practice.

Can a medical apps make us better doctors? CPR Game is a great example of using technology to explore new ways of learning. This serious game simulates a cardiac arrest scenario and teaches resuscitation skills by encouraging players to identify and preform critical actions in a timely manner to save their patient. I found that playing this game helped me remember my resuscitation ABCs and keep a level head when working on medical codes. I look forward to seeing more fun, interactive teaching tools like this in medical education.

On the other hand, I reviewed some apps that I wouldn’t recommend to other physicians. Coags Uncomplicated seemed like a great free educational app at first glance, but in the end turned out to have a hidden agenda – it was created by a drug company to sell more drugs. I called out Emergency Medicine iQ, a board review app, for having inaccurate references and incorrect explanations.  I also question the role of some apps in clinical practice – is it safe to use an app with an automated ECG algorithm? I don’t think so.” Read the full article here.Clearly there is a great need for this resource as “not all apps are created equal”. Be sure to read these professional reviews first!

Read the reviews and get the latest Medical Apps at iMedicalApps.com!

Silence Kills: Can Technology Drive Meaningful Cultural Change In Healthcare?

technology in healthcare communication

CEO of X Tech Ventures Robert Szczerba has posted another great article connecting the future of healthcare and technology. In this LinkedIn post he reminds us that an AACN report entitled ‘Silence Kills’ reported that out of 1700 healthcare professionals “84 percent of doctors observed colleagues who took dangerous shortcuts when caring for patients and 88 percent worked with people who showed poor clinical judgment. Despite the risks to patients, less than 10 percent of physicians, nurses, and other clinical staff directly confronted their colleagues about their concerns.” Robert continues to explore this gap in healthcare communication:

In the years following this study, there has been a strong movement by a number of companies to develop improved communication and patient safety tools. However, the 2010 follow-up study The Silent Treatment concluded, “that while safety tools are one part of the solution to improving patient care, they do not compensate for crucial conversation failures in the hospital. Silence still kills.

A common perception in the healthcare industry is that the underlying cultural environment limits technological advances in safety and efficiency. Following this logic, no significant advances can be made until major cultural changes occur. However, what if technology was not necessarily limited by culture, but, if applied correctly, could actually be used to drive a desired cultural change?

Read the full article entitled “Silence Kills: Can Technology Drive Meaningful Cultural Change in Healthcare” on LinkedIn

Various Medical Technology Related News Articles

future of healthcare in the uk

Here are some interesting articles I have read lately:

How EHR adoption impacts patient safety in the ED by  Kyle Murphy, PhD talks about the lack of patient safety feedback tools within EMR systems. Kyle makes a strong argument why performance improvement efforts should be tied to EHR systems.

Patient Safety – Pay Now Or Pay Later by Alexandra Wilson Pecci examines why hospitals should seriously consider assistive technologies to increase patient safety and protect healthcare providers from injury.

Doctors Slow to Embrace Innovation? Maybe it’s because they own all the Risk by Shahid Shah shares why liability on new devices without proven data slows innovation in healthcare. Shahid also shares about his recent talk about actionable innovation in healthcare by moving beyond the hype of “disruptive technologies”.

The UK-Based Raconteur Covers the Future of Healthcare in this online version of their magazine. Great read that covers a range of topics from online patient services, the need to support technological innovation, patient social media interactions, healthcare technology hubs in the UK and making sure tech boxes don’t just sit on the shelf.