Dr. Paul Phrampus Shares Video: Beyond Healthcare Simulation Debriefing

paul phrampus simulation

UPMC WISER Simulation Center Director and Past President of SSH Dr. Paul Phrampus recently shared this helpful lecture regarding his perspective about the evolving landscape of healthcare simulation debriefing:


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Medical, Nursing and Healthcare has become an important teaching and assessment tool to assist in the education of healthcare providers. Simulation can help someone become a better physician, nurse, paramedic, pharmacist through simulation programs in medicine, nursing and EMS. His new Youtube channel will feature videos to assist with faculty development, trian the trainer and other aspects of simulation program development for initial program design as well as program enhancement.

Visit the Simulating Healthcare Youtube Channel for more helpful videos!


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7th Annual ASPiH UK Simulation Conference Opens Registration!

Registration is now open for the 2016 Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare (ASPiH) UK meeting! This is the 7th annual event from the innovative leaders of healthcare simulation support in the United Kingdom.

Key Event Info:
Mercure Grand Hotel
Bristol, UK
Nov. 15th-17th 2016

Speakers confirmed include Professors:

  • Charles Vincent Patient Safety Lead Oxford
  • Wendy Reid Medical Director HEE
  • Brendan McCormack Head of Division of Nursing Aberdeen.
  • Ed Piele Professor Emeritus in Medical Education University of Warwick

Opening Keynote Address

Dr. John Vozenilek  MD, FACEP, Chief Medical Officer Jump trading Simulation and Education Centre University of Illinois will be providing the Opening Keynote address.

Prior to his appointment as Vice President and Chief Medical Officer for Simulation for the Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center, “Dr. Voz” was the Director of Simulation Technology and Immersive Learning program for the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University where he provided central coordination and oversight for the undergraduate, graduate, interdisciplinary, and continuing medical education programs.

Under his direction, the medical school created additional organizational capabilities and infrastructure, building resources for educators who wish to use additional innovative learning technologies for teaching and assessment, measuring success with patient-based outcomes research. In May of 2008, Dr. Vozenilek co-chaired the first Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) – sponsored national consensus conference on using simulation research to define and develop clinical expertise. In his work at Northwestern he served as faculty for the Institute for Healthcare Research and its Center for Patient Safety, and continues to teach within its master’s degree program in health care quality and safety.

Learn more & Register at the ASPiH 2016 Event Page today!

Simulation in Healthcare Journal — June 2016 Article List

Simulation in Healthcare

Here is the breakdown of articles in the latest Simulation in Healthcare journal from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare:

Simulation in Healthcare June 2016 – Volume 11 – Issue 3:

  • When the Mannequin Dies, Creation and Exploration of a Theoretical Framework Using a Mixed Methods Approach Tripathy, Shreepada; Miller, Karen H.; Berkenbosch, John W.; McKinley, Tara F.; Boland, Kimberly A.; Brown, Seth A.; Calhoun, Aaron W.
  • “Debriefing-on-Demand”: A Pilot Assessment of Using a “Pause Button” in Medical Simulation McMullen, Michael; Wilson, Rosemary; Fleming, Melinda; Mark, David; Sydor, Devin; Wang, Louie; Zamora, Jorge; Phelan, Rachel; Burjorjee, Jessica E.
  • Standardized Patient Encounters: Periodic Versus Postencounter Evaluation of Nontechnical Clinical Performance Turner, T. Robert; Scerbo, Mark W.; Gliva-McConvey, Gayle A.; Wallace, Amelia M.
  • Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Improves Medical Student Performance and Retention of Core Clinical Skills Reed, Trent; Pirotte, Matthew; McHugh, Mary; Oh, Laura; Lovett, Shannon; Hoyt, Amy E.; Quinones, Donna; Adams, William; Gruener, Gregory; McGaghie, William C.
  • Using Virtual Patients to Teach Empathy: A Randomized Controlled Study to Enhance Medical Students’ Empathic Communication Foster, Adriana; Chaudhary, Neelam; Kim, Thomas; Waller, Jennifer L.; Wong, Joyce; Borish, Michael; Cordar, Andrew; Lok, Benjamin; Buckley, Peter F.
  • Learning Neonatal Intubation Using the Videolaryngoscope: A Randomized Trial on Mannequins Assaad, Michael-Andrew; Lachance, Christian; Moussa, Ahmed
  • Simulation-Based Assessment of ECMO Clinical Specialists Fehr, James J.; Shepard, Mark; McBride, Mary E.; Mehegan, Mary; Reddy, Kavya; Murray, David J.; Boulet, John R.
  • Applying Judgment Analysis Theory and Methods to Obtain an Insight Into Clinical Judgments: Implementation and Findings With a Simulated Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Setup Nadler, Izhak; Globus, Omer; Pessach-Gelblum, Liat; Strauss, Zipora; Sela, Rina; Ziv, Amitai
  • More Than One Way to Debrief: A Critical Review of Healthcare Simulation Debriefing Methods Sawyer, Taylor; Eppich, Walter; Brett-Fleegler, Marisa; Grant, Vincent; Cheng, Adam
  • Creating a Simulated Pharmacy Soto, Cory; Stiner, Jamie; Noji, Daniel O.; Rusheen, Jeffrey M.; Huang, Yue Ming
  • Response to “Unlike History, Should a Simulator Not Repeat Itself?” Smith, Roger

SSH Members can read the full ‘Simulation in Healthcare’ Journal on the LWW Website!


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SESAM Lisbon 2016 Day 2 Updates

sesam 2016

Day 1 Recap can be found here.

SESAM’s Clinical Simulation Conference with Dubai Update

Helen Henderson, Lead Simulation Educator from the Khalaf Ahmad Al Habtoor Medical Simulation Center in Dubai Healthcare City provided an update about the 3 year partnership between SESAM and the Dubai based simulation center for simulation conferences. Helen shared details about the past 3 years of events and invited attendees to the International Medical Education Conference in Dubai at the newly renamed Mohammad Bin Rashid Medical University March 2nd – 4th 2017, with the tagline “Health Professional Education in an Interconnected World”.

Plenary Address by Faizal Haji

Following this, Faizal A. Haji provided the presentation “Promises and pitfalls simulation in resource-limited settings”, highlighting updates from the International Pediatric Society in Simulation’s work to develop simulation training support for the African country of Malawi. Malawi, with a population of about 15 million only has about 1/3 of the health workforce it needs to serve its citizens. IPSS has been working with the Malawi Ministry of Health in 2013, starting with a needs assessment of the clinical training services available to healthcare professionals within the country using field notes, key interviews, site visits, and simulation demonstrations. When the number of healthcare professionals was increased, clinical training was reduced because of a lack of faculty — and the quality of providers drastically decreased over the past 10 years. The team investigated the use of telesimulation training to provide education across long distances live with visual aids. While the training programs worked, there was still a need to provide hands-on training but the time to receive such training was extremely limited. While resources such as simulation technology are available (through donations), but because of the limited clinical faculty training was rare.

Faizal highlighted the research article “Development of a simulation and skills centre in east Africa: a Rwandan – Canadian partnership” which succeeded because of:

  1. Long-term partnership
  2. Identification of need for dedicated funding for space/staff
  3. locally driven curriculum
  4. Ongoing mentorship beyond the initial train-the-trainers program.

Faizal concluded by reminding us that we need to be understanding of the health systems we are building simulation programs for, and that we are absolutely able to address high level system issues with low resource simulations to then do focused programatic training in key issue areas.

  • Partnerships make the project work
  • Context matters and educational interventions don’t exist in vaccuum
  • Process matters: how you implement training is just as important to consider as the content itself
  • Bad Habits are hard to fix so be sure to start training programs strong!

Stay tuned to this article for updates throughout the day, and follow the action on #SESAM2016!

22nd Annual Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine Event Opens in Lisbon Portugal

sesam-2016

Today in Lisbon Portugal more than 700 healthcare simulation champions from around the world met for the 22nd annual Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM).

You can watch the event LIVE on facebook here!

The president of the Portuguese Simulation Society, the Director of the Portuguese Medical Association, and the Portuguese Administer of Health helped to introduce the event which took place at the Lisbon Conference Center near the San Francisco Bridge.

society in europe for simulation applied to medicine

SESAM President Antoine Tesniere thanked the international attendees and reminded them about the event’s opportunities to network, learn, and collaborate

Lou Oberndorf, Founder of METI, introduced the opening keynote lecture series with his name speaking to SESAM as a fellow pioneer in healthcare simulation, being one of the oldest organizations in the world dedicated to the field. “20 years after we have launched this innovative technology and now, virtually any place in the world, you could go into almost every medical school, and many of the nursing schools, and encounter simulation”. Lou challenged the audience to avoid complacency, and to constantly ask for more innovation from one another and from vendors. He then announced his honor at introducing the keynote speaker

Opening Keynote Address by Dr. Rick Satava

satava sesam 2016 Dr. Richard Satava MD FACS, Professor Emeritus of Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center spoke to the topic of “Next Generation Curriculum and Technology for Simulation”.

He focused his talk on demonstrated development and alid of curriculum competency preliminary proficiency based progression methodology using the fundamentals of robotic surgery as an exemplar.

Dr. Satava asked the audience to consider “Does this training things safer for my patient?” He shared with proficiency-based progression training to consistently meet a high level of skill now and increase that ability as learners move down the line. He then shared how his team built learning devices first through simulated animation to perfect the model before creating a physical prototype. With these prototypes, learners must prove competency with a measured qualitative experience with specific benchmarks, and are not allowed to continue onwards until each step is proven proficient.

For new technologies, Dr. Satava highlighted future laser technologies which will provide non-invasive surgeries and advances in 3d printing. He then closed by reminding us that healthcare technology is neutral, and sooner than later, humans will evolve thanks to use of these technologies.

Registered delegates will be able to watch the keynote sessions live on their mobile devices and watch the recordings after the event from the comfort of their home.

Follow the live tweets on @SESAMSimulation and
@HealthySim with the hashtag #SESAM2016!

*Afternoon Session Update:

Flinders University Professor Harry Owen published the work “Simulation in Healthcare Education”, and provided a breakdown of key historical updates including the first auscultation simulator in 1867 and various OB simulators from the 18th century! About the book: Simulation in healthcare education has a long history, yet in many ways, we have been reinventing the wheel during the last 25 years. Historically, simulators have been much more than simple models, and we can still learn from aspects of simulation used hundreds of years ago. This book gives a narrative history of the development of simulators from the early 1700s to the middle of the 20th century when simulation in healthcare appeared to all but die out.  It is organized around the development of simulation in different countries and includes at the end a guide to simulators in museums and private collections throughout the world.  The aim is to increase understanding of simulation in the professional education of healthcare providers by exploring the historical context of simulators that were developed in the past, what they looked like, how they were used, and examples of simulator use that led to significant harm and an erosion of standards. The book is addressed to the healthcare simulation community and historians of medicine. Buy it through the link below:

Advances in Simulation with Editor in Chief Debra Nestel

Professor Nestel provided an update regarding the recently launched Advances in Simulation journal which is open access, starting with an introduction to the editors of the journal and the supporting reviewer team.

Advances in Simulation Benefits to Authors:

  • SESAM’s Professional Journal
  • Open Access
  • Promotion and Press Coverage

Update from launch 15 months ago:

  • Editorial Board formation
  • Category types
  • Manuscript commissioning
  • Launched January 11 2016
  • 21 articles published
    • 13 research articles
  • Promotional activities
  • Supplements portfolio
  • Secured over 300 reviewers
  • Most accessed articles has been read more than 1700 times

Learn more about free access to Advances in Simulation here.

Afternoon Plenary from SSH President Dr. Chad Epps

Dr. Epps, Executive Director of Simulation at UTHSC and President of SSH, started his plenary with a breakdown about improv, connecting the performance style to healthcare simulation.

As a clinician, and not an educator, Chad shared how he started considering some key questions after building a training assessment criteria for his anesthesiology residents. How did he know his checklist for assessment was valid? How valid was this tool? As, perhaps a tool designed for professional ED professionals would not work that well for an academic setting with residents. And beyond that — how competent was the assessors?

Dr. Epps then shared some resources for assessment development in simulation including the Assessment Standards of Best Practice in Simulation from INACSL and the SSH Accreditation Standards in Assessment. He also recommend the book “Defining Excellence in Simulation Programs” — which you can buy below:

Learn more about Dr. Epps on LinkedIn!

One Week Left! Early-Bird Registrations to SimGHOSTS Simulation Technology Training Events in AUS, UK, USA End Soon!

simghosts-logo

Did you know you now only have one week left to secure early-bird registrations to SimGHOSTS 2016 Summer events in Australia, United Kingdom, and United States? The time to secure huge savings on the world’s leading simulation technology training events is now!

“Everyone involved in operating simulation needs to be at SimGHOSTS.” ­
Amy Wise, Health Sciences Sim Coordinator, North Central Texas College

Why an Event Specific to Those Operating Healthcare Simulation Technology?

Medical Simulation is an emerging professional field which currently has little to no formalized educational pathways for entrance. Thus, everyone who starts or continues a career into medical simulation has side­stepped from another field or industry. This means that members of this community bring with them a wealth of specialized knowledge that others will not have. The SimGHOSTS meeting is the primary way for this new professional community to come together and share these best practices gained from years of experience in other fields, will enable all Sim Techs to walk away with a greater ability to perform the many responsibilities of their professional duties.

SimGHOSTS Advantages Over Other Simulation Events

Hands-­on & Specific Content: Between wound creation in our moulage courses, to advanced networking workshops, to intense workgroup sessions… SimGHOSTS is all about the doing. Unlike other events that cater to clinical educators and focus on faculty integration, debriefing or other non­technical courses, Sim Techs come to SimGHOSTS to focus on issues relevant to their position. Attendees return home with valuable skills and knowledge of new techniques that can enhance realism in scenarios, increase reliability and flexibility of a simulation center’s systems, and more.

Affordable registration: The SimGHOSTS board works hard to partner with the right host institutions, hotels and vendor sponsors to make sure the event is the best value for investments made into technical staff. Unlike other events that provide Technology courses as an afterthought, SimGHOSTS exists specifically for the purpose of providing resources to the technical user first and foremost. This is the only meeting solely built, operated and lead by Sim Techs. Other simulation technical events don’t come close to the day for day cost or value gained at SimGHOSTS which is jam­packed with diverse and innovative content. Plus, we work overtime with hotel partners to offer quality accommodations sometimes HALF the cost of other simulation events.

Personal connections: Simulation technical staff are often working alone and unable to “talk shop” to learn better ways to do their job. SimGHOSTS events give attendees the chance to be surrounded by their peer community and share best practices. Attendees return home with new ideas and new resources from national and international colleagues working in simulation centers at universities, hospitals, fire departments and more!

Australia
Australian Catholic University
Platinum Sponsored by Laerdal Medical
Download the Brochure
Melbourne, Victoria
Pre-Symposium: July 5th, 2016
Symposium: July 6th-8th, 2016

United Kingdom
Co-hosted by ASPiH
St. Georges Simulation & Clinical Skills Centre (GAPS)
Download the Brochure
London, England
Pre-Symposium: July 18th, 2016
Symposium: July 19th-20th, 2016

United States
Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center
Download the Brochure
Peoria, Illinois
Pre-Symposium: August 2nd, 2016
Symposium: August 3rd-5th, 2016

Middle East & Africa
Supported by Simulead
Mohammed Bin Rashid Academic Medical Center
Dubai, UAE
Pre-Symposium: November 13th, 2016
Symposium: November 14th-15th, 2016

Register Now Through the SimGHOSTS 2016 Events Page!

WBUR News: In Simulation Era, Your Doc’s First Try At A Procedure Should Not Be On You

training with healthcare simulation

WBUR recently covered the progress and challenges of medical simulation with an interview with SSH Board of Directors members Dr. Charles “Chuck” Pozner:

Most doctors never forget the paralyzing terror of their first invasive procedure.

Dr. Charles Pozner, of Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, recalls the first time he placed a central line, which involves sticking an eight-inch-long needle into a patient’s jugular vein to place an intravenous line. He had never even seen it done before, but a chief resident offered him the opportunity after a long day working together.

“When I was a medical student, the last thing you wanted to say when someone offered a procedure to you was ‘no.’ You wanted to learn, to be part of the team,” Pozner told me. The chief resident walked him through it without mishap, but “it was an unsafe thing for the patient, and an unsafe thing for me, because I was potentially harming the patient,” he said.

Twenty years later, in 2013, I went through a similar process. I watched a colleague place a central line during my first week as an intern. A couple of days later, I placed my first one, as my senior resident supervised. Thankfully, everything went fine. But that doesn’t mean I’m comfortable with the idea of wielding eight-inch-long needles after only watching someone do a procedure once.

“See one, do one, teach one” is the ancient medical adage for this: that after doctors in training have seen one procedure or operation, they’re qualified to do the next one. It has been the model for teaching physicians for generations.

But in the age of robotic surgery and simulation medicine, is this concept really acceptable anymore? The short answer is no. Clearly, doctors in training should practice on computers and simulated patients, not real ones. Particularly when, according to a study out this week, medical errors are the No. 3 cause of death nationwide.

The longer answer is more complicated. No one openly defends the concept in medical journals — in fact, experts talk about “see one, practice many, do one.” But the “see one, do one, teach one” culture still persists in hospitals around the country, and it remains routine for physicians in training to practice their first procedure on real patients. (As a patient, what can you do about it? See the tips below.)

“Would you fly on an airplane if they say, ‘We’ll drop the price of our tickets but our pilots will opt out of flight simulation?’” – Dr. Antonio Gargiulo

But that is changing, as more hospitals and medical schools invest in high-tech simulation centers like the $12 million center unveiled by Boston Children’s Hospital this week. Dr. Pozner, who is medical director of the Brigham’s STRATUS Center for Medical Simulation, says that in time, medical simulation will mean the death of “see one, do one, teach one.”

The Pilot Analogy

Consider pilots. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, the pilot who remarkably landed his plane on the Hudson River, is often mentioned in the medical literature on simulation, as are his hundreds of hours practicing simulated emergencies. If Dr. Atul Gawande famously brought the pilot’s checklist to surgery, simulation proponents think more pilot-style simulation should be brought to medicine. “It’s called procedural memory,” Dr. Pozner said.

And studies show that simulation works in medicine. One small study trained doctors in robotic surgery, showing that they could reach expert level proficiency by the time they operated on their first real patient. “The main advantage of this tool is you can get technically perfect before you even touch a patient,” said Dr. Antonio Gargiulo, medical director of the Center for Robotic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Read the full Common Health article on WBUR’s website!

HealthySimulation.com’s IMSH 2016 Exhibit Hall Video Interview Recap

ssh medical simulation expo

Over the past few months HealthySimulation.com has released numerous video interviews taken at the International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare’s 2016 San Diego based meeting. Did you miss any? Below is a recap of all the posted videos posted so you can learn more about the latest medical simulation product news:

By watching these videos you will have a better perspective about the latest medical simulation products and services!

Subscribe to HealthySim’s Free Monthly Simulation Newsletter
to receive all the best content!

Uchida Yoko Global Limited PF-Note Provides Healthcare Simulation Recording Platform – IMSH 2016 Video Interview

uchida medical simulation recording

At IMSH 2016 HealthySimulation.com was able to secure a video interview with the team from Japanese based company Uchida Yoko to learn more about their PF-Note audiovisual recording and debriefing system. Interesting here is the built in capability of directly connected student clickers. Watch the exclusive short video interview below to learn more:

From the Uchida Yoko PF-Note Brochure:

Entire even can be conveniently recorded in high definition with ease.

  • Audiovisual data such as computer screen, blackboard, or presentation equipment saved as a video file in real time.
  • Recording started by simply pressing a button. Screen layout can be also be easily switched.
  • Contents don’t require editing after recording so they can be used right then and there.

Student reaction can be recorded at any time using a wireless clicker.

  • Reactions that offer clues as to whether or not contents of classes are understood well or not can be recorded in real time.
  • Student reaction can be obtained during or after class in the form of a questionnaire.
  • Roll call can be accomplished by clicker using the roll call support function.

Separate review of important part of the class

  • Because you can record student reaction together with the class, you can see what students don’t understand or what they are interested in while viewing the class scene.
  • Instructors can confirm what what was effective and what needs to be improved from the student reactions.
  • The data generated when the instructor or TA presses the clicker can be recorded as a thumbnail. If the instructor records important point during the class, the students can use them for subsequent review.

You can learn more about this system from the
Uchida Yoko PF-Note Brochure

Mimic Technologies Xperience Robotic Surgery Simulator Team Trainer – IMSH 2016 Video Interview

robotic surgery medical simulation trainer

At IMSH 2016 HealthySim interviewed Glenn Carstater Vice President of Domestic Sales at Mimic Technologies to learn more about their innovative Xperience Robotic Simulation Training System. Watch the video below to learn more and see the system in action:

About Mimic Technologies

Mimic Technologies, founded in 2001, is a pioneer and leader in robotic surgery simulation and training. Our mission is to set the standard for simulation and training in medical robotics through visionary leadership, superior software, market leading hardware, and hands-on simulation training. With leading institutions, Mimic is developing next-generation learning tools and curricula to advance robotic surgery training and promote patient safety.

In 2007, Mimic unveiled the dV-Trainer, the first simulator to recreate the look and feel of the da Vinci Surgery System. In 2011, the da Vinci Skills Simulatorwas introduced, a virtual reality simulator for the da Vinci Si System jointly developed by Mimic and Intuitive Surgical.

About the Xperience Team Trainer

Bringing robotic surgery simulation and training to the first assistant. In the OR, cohesion between the console-side surgeon and first assistant is crucial. The best surgical teams anticipate one another’s movements. Routine tasks are executed crisply and efficiently.

Xperience Team Trainer enables the robotic surgeon and first assistant to use simulation training when and where it’s most beneficial—outside of the OR.

How can the Xperience Team Trainer strengthen your robotics program?

  • Basic skills exercises develop the first assistant’s psychomotor skills and facilitate rehearsal of interaction with the console side surgeon
  • Virtual training for real-life situations in the OR help promote patient safety and mitigate risk for the institution
  • Team training allows for development of OR communication protocol in a safe simulation environment

MScore Skills Assessment:

The system also includes the opportunity to learn through the MScore proficiency-based skills assessment platform:

Objective skills assessment is critical in robotic surgery training. To measure a trainee’s level of proficiency, the dV-Trainer uses the comprehensive metrics and experienced surgeon data of Mimic’s MScore. It allows administrators to track performance and learning progress over time, personalize user accounts, create and share customized simulation curricula, manage courses, and export data for in-depth analysis.

Featuring data collected from more than 100 experienced surgeons with over 75 robotic cases completed, MScore assessment is based on expert mean and standard deviation data (similar to the FLS protocol) to facilitate credentialing and privileging. Users can choose between the new Proficiency Based System and the legacy Classic System; change proficiency baselines; and customize the scoring protocol to fit the needs of their institution.

Learn more about the Xperience Team Trainer on Mimic’s Website!