Teaching Patient Handoffs to Medical Students in OB/GYN: Simulation Curriculum and Assessment Tool

mededportal simulation

MedEdPortal, a division of AAMC, just released this healthcare simulation curriculum and assessment tool for those teaching patient handoffs to medical students in OB/GYN. You must be a subscriber to the website to get the full toolkit.

Abstract


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Patient handoffs, the communications required for the safe transfer of patient care, are known to be a common source of medical errors. Simulation exercises are effective techniques for teaching the procedures and patient interaction skills involved in a handoff. We developed a teaching tool that allows students to individually interact with a simulated patient, develop a treatment plan, and practice a handoff to another provider. The curriculum is a flexible instructional tool to teach patient handoffs in the context of a simulated obstetric emergency for learners at the clerkship through first-year obstetrics and gynecology resident levels. The curriculum secondarily teaches management of first-trimester bleeding with acute blood loss and can be adapted to allow advanced learners to practice obtaining informed consent.

To evaluate this simulation for educational effectiveness, we developed a faculty observation assessment tool. The simulation assessments for history taking, fund of knowledge, and interpersonal skills were predictive of subsequent clerkship clinical grades. Eighty percent of students agreed the exercise was realistic, 95% agreed it was relevant to the clinical curriculum, 90% agreed the simulation taught handoff skills, and 73% agreed the simulation increased confidence in handoff skills. Students uniformly found the curriculum to be relevant, realistic, and effective at teaching handoff skills. Use of this curriculum has the potential to improve students’ communication skills, handoff performance, and confidence during an obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. The assessment tool may allow early identification of students in need of improvement in communication skills.

Read the full article and get the toolset here on MedEdPortal!


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Healthcare Education Training Expands MedSim Magazine Content

medsim magazine

Halldale’s MedSim Magazine has expanded its focus into a new group called “Healthcare Training And Education”, which features a recently launched website. While no longer specifically focusing on healthcare simulation like HealthySimulation.com, the resource does cover medical simulation topics while also covering topics relevant to the larger topic of improving healthcare training.

About HTE

The mission of Healthcare Training and Education (HTE) has become to be one of the leading sources of Healthcare, Training and Education information by providing an unprecedented level of value to our customers through quality, relevant and timely content.

Preparing the Next Generation of Healthcare Professionals

HTE aspires to promote the best education and training practices for the next generation of healthcare professionals. Experienced professionals in medicine, simulation and training write our content to address the needs of medical practitioners, educators and academics around the world. HTE features innovative healthcare practice information such as the latest simulations developed to train different medical professionals at different stages of their education. It also covers curriculum advancement to highlight the knowledge and skills needed to ensure patient safety and reduce healthcare costs.

Your Comprehensive Source for the Latest Healthcare News and Opportunities

In addition to our original content, HTE is your comprehensive source for a variety of other important healthcare industry tools and resources including conferences and career opportunties

A Division of The Halldale Group

Halldale is a modeling, simulation and training company in the B2B media space. Our company is unique by having a global team of expert writers who are also simulation and training experts. Halldale’s editorial team comprises of practicing medical training experts and ex-simulation industry professionals. Halldale has a dedicated publishing and event team working around the world.

Learn more at HealthcareTrainingAndEducation.com!

Collaborative Simulation Program Development – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 1

expanding a medical simulation program

Last week we announced that the highly praised HealthySimAdmin video series is being made publicly available for the first time. Today we post Part 1: Collaborative simulation program development, across institutions and disciplines, which you can watch below:

Imagine splitting the cost of a brand new simulation center and operational program in thirds, while simultaneously increasing access to equipment, space and staff support. Now also consider the benefits of partnering with other healthcare professional disciplines to further breakdown the traditional educational training silos through your simulation program. Dean Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN from UNLV’s Nursing and Allied Health Programs will launch our discussion into how to develop a multi-disciplinary multi-institutional collaborative simulation center. Dean Yucha spent three years leading the development of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas, which supports the clinical education of three distinct institutions across a multitude of disciplines. Following Dean Yucha’s presentation, the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts will continue the discussion of related topics such as stakeholder identification and board/committee needs, types of umbrella administrative structures, architectural design considerations, financial reimbursement systems, building and program support services, legal requirements, ongoing collaborative issues and more. Funding models will be touched upon briefly but will be explored in greater depth during subsequent sessions. Audience question and answer sessions will follow the lecture and panel discussion. In summary, in this session we will learn how to build and continue a successful collaborative partnership for a medical simulation program.

About the Presenter

Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN is Dean of the School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She was a developer of the CSCLV and serves on its Advisory Committee. Dr. Yucha earned her academic credentials from the State University of New York system: her BS in Nursing from the University at Albany, her MS in Nursing from the University at Buffalo, and her PhD in Physiology from Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse NY. She worked at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the University of Florida before moving to Las Vegas. Dr. Yucha has received research funding from the National Institutes of Health, has published numerous articles, and is editor of a scientific journal, Biological Research for Journal.

Dr. Yucha was instrumental in creating the original concept of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. She worked with architects to design the space and worked closely with other Deans to develop the curriculum, staffing, and financial model to sustain the center. She serves on the Advisory Committee for the CSCLV.

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Newfoundland SimSummit Starts This Week By Royal College of Surgeons Canada

simulation conference newfoundland canada

Taking place later this week in NewFoundland Canada is the Simulation Summit, a conference connecting healthcare simulation champions and vendors together. Are you participating in the conference, tweet to us @HealthySim and share your favorite moment!

The Simulation Summit is a unique and practical, interprofessional medical simulation education conference, which attracts hundreds of international simulation educators, researchers, health care professionals and other individuals engaged in the field of simulation.

The 2016 conference theme, Extreme Simulation, will explore simulation research, learning and practice in a spectrum of contexts and settings, from hospitals and university teaching centres, to rural and remote locations.

Participants at the 2016 Simulation Summit will have the opportunity to collaborate with international colleagues on knowledge translation as it relates to simulation in healthcare; examine new technologies in medical simulation; investigate advances in medical simulation and much more.

Participants at the 2016 summit will:

    • Collaborate with international colleagues on knowledge translation as it relates to simulation in the health professions.
    • Investigate advances in medical simulation for health profession in the realm of assessment and education
    • Examine new technologies in medical simulation for health professions; and
    • Plan to integrate medical simulation for health professions across the education spectrum from students to practitioners.

Learn more on the Simulation Summit Website!

Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare Updates

aspih uk simulation conference 2016

A few updates from our friends at ASPiH!

The 2016 ASPiH UK November Bristol Conference Agenda Brochure has been posted, with keynote announcement by Dr. John Vozenilek MD, FACEP. Chief Medical Officer Jump Simulation and Education Centre University of Illinois. This is a multidisciplinary conference focusing on the latest research, technologies and applications of simulated practice 15th-17th November 2016 at the Mercure Grand Hotel in Bristol.

ASPiH and the Chartered Institute for Ergonomics and Human Factors (CIEHF) are pleased to announce a series of co-designed one day workshops to help illustrate and enhance the integration of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) methodologies within health care education and delivery.

Thursday 29th September 2016 – Glasgow Crowne Plaza
Tuesday 15th November 2016 – Bristol Mercure Grande

Each event will feature presentation of different case studies to enable participants to consider the techniques used in more depth and gain an appreciation of the application of HFE across a range of health care contexts and purposes. We are in discussion with CIEHF regarding options for publishing a report or summary paper that will feature selected case studies for wider circulation to policy makers, regulators, commissioners, and professional bodies in healthcare.

Finally, membership to the ASPiH website has been upgraded with the following opportunities:

  • Discounted registration fee at the annual ASPiH Conference
  • Discount with selected affiliate organisations
  • Subsidised fees at selected UK regional events
  • Reduced rates for ASPiH delivered or supported training courses
  • Reduced subscription rate for the BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning Journal
  • Opportunity to be involved with ASPiH Special Interest Groups (SIGS) relevant to expertise/speciality
  • Eligible for being invited to Chair positions in SIGS and for membership of the Executive committee
  • Opportunity to promote job vacancies free of charge on the ASPiH website
  • Communications Receive direct email notices and quarterly e-Newsletter from ASPiH
  • Receive the ASPiH Annual Report summarising the Associations’ member-driven activities and key initiatives
  • Connect with other members and experts via our community

Visit ASPiH’s website for more great resources from UK’s leading Simulation Organization!

7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 2

7 highest medical simulation articles

Last week we covered the first half of “7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program“, following our series of articles which cover the “business side” of selling the tool of simulation to higher levels of administration. Other topics from this series included the “Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget” and “3 Key Resources to Expand Your simulation Program“.

Today we finish up with the second half of steps necessary to be affective in starting or expanding your simulation program, with examples from my time as Director of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. In two years we were able to secure a quarter of a millions dollars in external business contracts providing simulation services to local, regional, and international groups. Miss the first part of this article, click here to start at the beginning which covers gaining support, building a program, and seizing opportunities.

4. Market Your Program

Once you have built a program plan that has potential to secure internal or external clients, your team will need to establish a marketing plan. First and foremost your department should Build a Medical Simulation Program Website, rich with multimedia. If available, work with your institution’s media department to help build and craft multimedia materials such as flyers, websites and pages, pictures, videos, and social media outlets. Learn more here about “How to Add Multimedia to Your Simulation Program“.

Designing effective marketing materials is a skill set that you or your team members may not naturally have at your disposal. There are countless resource materials for learning these skill sets such as 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People, but suffice to say your messaging should be clear, coherent, simple, and professional. With print material, use a maximum of three different fonts, and three different colors. Provide critical course, event, or program details relevant to capturing interest and providing key details such as dates, times, links, abstracts, and learning opportunities. Simplify “learning objectives” to 9 words or less, and use both paragraph and bullet point text formats for key content. (Psychological studies have shown that some people will only read paragraphs in advertisements, while others will only read bullet points). Images help to tell a story as “pictures are worth a thousand words”. If that is true then video is worth a million — but only if it is done professionally without shakey cameras, bad audio, or confusing editing!

Test your marketing messages by showing it to colleagues for feedback, but remember that your customer will be your greatest asset when it comes to learning from your created materials. Check out an example of simulation training courses in this recent CSCLV flyer. Can you spot some areas for improvement? What catches your eye? What areas distract you? Be sure to include call to actions that demonstrate the limited availability of your program, cost saving registration deadlines, other incentives like discounts for groups or longer campaigns as well as next steps like online registration or email contact.

Don’t forget about Social Media in relevant professional domains like twitter, youtube, and LinkedIn. Social Media Overload: Simple Social Media Strategies For Overwhelmed and Time Deprived Businesses is a good primer on how to effectively utilize social media for your marketing campaigns.

Finally — attend regional or national conferences and share your marketing materials on available pin boards or tables for external users, or on department cafeteria signs, newsletters, or other group sharing events for internal users.

5. Provide Quality

Remember that internal and external users of your simulation program are in essence your “customers”. We all know what happens when we have a bad experience at a store, restaurant, or movie — we don’t return and we let others know about it. Providing a high quality event, course, or learning opportunity is a crucial part of building a simulation program. The more realistic your environments, the more tested your simulation scenarios, the better the food you serve, the easier the directions to your facility, the more people will enjoy your program and the happier they will be with the experience.

This kind of experience is crucial for step 6, but before we get there, consider the experience you are providing by “trying it on” and imaging yourself with no prior knowledge about the activity. Or better yet, act as a customer and trial run all the various systems in place for your program. What areas do you find lacking in service, quality, or professionalism? Every detail matters when it comes to satisfying the learners, groups, and individuals that come through your program. You or your leadership should sit in on some or all of the first programs to see how things are working and gain first hand experience on what needs to be improved.

6. Gather Feedback & Testimonials

This is one of the most important steps to building a long-term successful simulation program. By gathering direct honest feedback from your participants you will be better able to learn what went right, but more importantly, what went wrong. Try not to lead the witness but ask open ended questions on top of “scale of 1-5” questions that cover the most crucial aspects of the program. By quickly sharing this feedback with your team you can incorporate new solutions to address key problems.

While working in Hollywood I learned that during test screenings of new films, producers cared most about the question “Would you recommend this movie to your friends?”. This is a crucial question that ultimately demonstrates the value of your program because individuals will only encourage others to also participate if they feel it will add social value to their relationship status because of the benefits it will bring their colleagues. In other words, is your simulation program “share worthy”? Be ready to capture some of the feedback you receive to utilize as testimonials for future participants and program marketing. Obviously you will need to secure permission to share feedback as testimonials, so talk to your legal team to see what kind of waiver will suffice. Use these testimonials in your future marketing material design, as future users weigh such reviews more heavily than other types of messaging, simply because it reduces the risk of “going first”.

7. Learn, Improve and Grow

With honest feedback you can tweak your smaller programs for better efficiency and outcomes, preparing you for larger growth opportunities in the future. Those making investments into your program, whether its external users or the CEO of your hospital, will be moved farther faster with proven results with budgets already allocated. Becoming a cost-reduction program through improved learning and patient care outcomes enables you to increase budgets for future innovative practices. Dr. John “Voz” Vozenilek shared at SimGHOSTS 2016 USA during the EMS SimulationIQ sponsored keynote address how the Jump Trading Simulation Center is doing this very thing.

Other areas that will help your program grow are “Kaizen” Events To Increase Efficiency & Outcomes, the ability to negotiate with others to ensure maximum return on investment, and always being open to new opportunities. However, remember that after you have built a successful program, some smaller activities may no longer provide enough return on investment for your program’s growth to warrant the time and energy necessary to do such work. For example at the CSCLV, some UNLV students wanted to utilize the simulation center to film their senior project. We allowed them to use the space only to find out later they had damaged some equipment. Without insurance, we had to eat the cost of repairing that equipment with no value added to our center’s portfolio.

 

Hear what other simulation center directors have done to increase sales of their program’s services by watching the HealthySimAdmin series — free for HealthySimulation.com Newsletter Subscribers!

Updates from SimGHOSTS, The Leaders in Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Support

sim tech conference

SimGHOSTS recently wrapped their 2016 global events in the United States, Australia, and in the United Kingdom (with their partner ASPiH). Check out these awesome updates from the world’s leading non-profit organization supporting healthcare simulation technology specialists.

Remember there is still 50% discounted annual subscription to SimGHOSTS.org to celebrate their recent affiliation with INACSL. Subscribe today to gain access to the course library, and watch all the recorded sessions from the SimGHOSTS 2016 events!

Peak TV Show Covers St. Luke’s University Health Network Simulation Medical School

simulation center interview

Medical simulation helps bridge the gap between classroom learning and real-life hands on experience for medical students. Joining us in the studio is Dr. Joel Rosenfeld, Chief Academic Officer for Temple University Medical School at St. Luke’s.

The PEAK is the Greater Lehigh Valley’s PREMIER lifestyle show featuring the latest medical news, personal fitness, healthy cooking and eating, exciting places and trends, and giving back in our community! If it’s innovative, informative, and fun — you’ll find it on The PEAK!

About St. Luke’s Simulation Center

State-of-the-art clinical simulation centers, located at both the Philadelphia North Broad Street and the Bethlehem St. Luke’s campuses, provide students with outstanding opportunities to develop their clinical and procedural skills. These centers include both robotic simulators and standardized patients as well as a variety of procedural skills training equipment. High fidelity, programmable robotic simulators imitate physiologic and clinical scenarios that clinicians may encounter. Small groups of students work together to assess the “patient’s” problem and to develop and implement a management plan.

A faculty member observes the group, then debriefs the students about the encounter to develop their skills for future encounters with patients. Students develop their history-taking and physical examination skills and professional behaviors through sessions with standardized patients and patient instructors. The opportunity to work first with standardized patients (who simulate real medical cases) helps to build students’ confidence towards the time when they will encounter real patients. Life-like task trainers (arms, head/neck, torsos, and other portions of the body) allow students to build their skills in performing a range of procedures such as phlebotomy, airway management, suturing, and urinary catheterization.

Students interested in surgery may begin to develop basic surgical skills during their preclinical years by participating in surgical interest groups and electives.

Learn How to Gain Media Attention for Your Sim Lab!

U.S. Army Awards Portion of $135M Medical Simulation Contract to ECS

Engineering & Computer Simulations us army medical simulation

Big news for US federal investment into healthcare simulation today with news that recently the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has awarded two contracts to Engineering and Computer Simulations (ECS) for research & development services designed to demonstrate and advance state-of-the-art simulation and training technologies. The goal of the initiative, called Simulation, Training and Engineering Services (STES), is to produce training/simulation systems that can adapt over time to changing Army needs and conditions. STES addresses three technical areas — TA 1: advanced simulation; TA 2: medical simulation; and TA 3: squad and small-team research. ECS will be developing simulations for medical simulation and squad and small-team research.

Waymon Armstrong, CEO of ECS, said: “Our depth and range of simulation experience enables us to deliver effective simulations for both medical and warfighter training. Because our designers and engineers are highly skilled with decades of experience in all aspects of military executions, they quickly comprehend the need and design solutions that achieve the desired result. The training solution may be based on a platform we’ve already produced for another client or military Program of Record. That means significant cost saving to the client, or if needed we can custom design the training tool.’

ECS was awarded portions of the $135M U.S. Army contract, which may be the single largest investment into healthcare systems by a non-corporate vendor.

About ECS

Our values are also reflected in our commitment to listen to and to understand our customers’ challenges to provide them with the right solutions on time and on budget. ECS dedicates itself to using the highest business standards to produce solutions that are custom tailored to our clients’ needs. Our mission is to improve the quality and efficiency of learning and preparedness through the use of ECS’ advanced learning technologies. Most of our custom solutions and products are derived from these core competencies. In a sense, these provide the foundation for how many of our solutions are developed. However, we are always learning new skills and more importantly, how to apply new skills to maximize return on investment for our customers.

Learn more at the ECS website Press Release!

Top 9 Most Read Healthcare Simulation Articles from Summer 2016

top 9 medical simulation articles 2016

Sim Champs do you subscribe to our free monthly healthcare simulation email newsletter? If so you may have seen these awesome articles which are the Top 9 most read medical simulation from Summer 2016! We’re highlighting the ones that have read, shared, and clicked the most so far — as we are sure they will bring increased adoption and utilization of simulation to your healthcare education program!

  1. University of San Francisco Now Offering Master of Science in Healthcare Simulation Online

  2. Simulation in Healthcare Journal — June 2016 Article List

  3. SimGHOSTS USA 2016 Opens at Jump Trading Simulation Center Sponsored by SimulationIQ

  4. Supporting Transitions in Medical Career Pathways: the Role of Simulation-Based Education

  5. Do Checklists Change Human Behaviors? Thoughts from Medical Lawyer Dr. Argy

  6. Laerdal Asks Simulation Experts “Is Simulation Just About the Simulator?” and More…

  7. TEDx Talk: Simulation Necessary To Prepare for Birthing Emergencies

  8. Media Covers May BMJ Article: “Medical Error 3rd Leading Cause of Death in U.S.” – Call for New Hashtag #SimToZero!

  9. Delta College Performs 6 Hour Trauma Simulation Scenario with Local Authorities

Bonus Link:

Here is the Top 10 Most Read Healthcare Simulation Articles
from HealthySimulation.com ever!