SimulationIQ IPE Provides Case-Based Virtual Patient Training For Healthcare Teams

ipe learning system online

Did you know that half of the suggested 440,000 deaths attributed to medical error are communication related? By providing healthcare students and professionals with more ways to study case based simulations, online, in their own time, together — is certainly a must have for every healthcare organization. What attracts me to this learning system is that multiple learning participants can participate on a case scenario which follows a patient over time, letting educators see communication between IPE over a longer period of time, even ongoing!

Enter SIMULATIONiQ IPE. Education Management Solutions, providers of SimulationIQ, now provide this case-based virtual patient IPE solution replicates different disciplines working together on a common case using an innovative technology platform. The IPE solution can be used to augment existing IPE programs and allow your faculty to operate at maximum efficiency, so that instructors can focus on what they do best: educate.

 

Breakdown in Communication

SIMULATIONiQ IPE provides full visibility of case, actions, treatment plan across all professions to facilitate cross-discipline communication.


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  • Role-based practice simulation
  • Integrated chat and discussion forum functions

Misdiagnosis

To avoid misdiagnosis, SIMULATIONiQ IPE offers visibility to diagnosis and care plan across disciplines to facilitate shared decision making.  This integrated team approach is facilitated by:

  • An interactive team-based question solution
  • Robust communication options including – voice conferencing, screen sharing, chat and discussion forums
  • Simulation scenario sessions to augment online or traditional courses

Coordination of Care

To improve coordination of care it provides immediate feedback to actions and orders that inform and allow for better coordination of the patient care team.

  • Real-time lab and discussion results
  • Total visibility to all facets of patient care
  • Assessment of best practice care knowledge through team and role-based questions
  • Reflective debrief to develop critical thinking skills

Learn more at the SimulationIQ IPE Website!


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When Something Goes Wrong At The Hospital, Who Pays? Costs of Medical Errors

medical errors

Shefali Luthra of Kaiser Health News recently shared the story of one patient’s unfortunate experience — which represents a global problem with the costs of medical errors: 

Despite the Institute of Medicine’s landmark 1999 report, “To Err Is Human,” and, more recently, provisions in the 2010 health law emphasizing quality of care, entering the hospital still brings risk. Whether because of mistakes, infections or plain bad luck, those who go in don’t always come out better.

More than 400,000 people die annually, in part thanks to avoidable medical errors, according to a 2013 estimate from the Journal of Patient Safety. In 2008, the most recent year studied, medical errors cost an extra $19.5 billion in national spending, most of which was spent on extra care and medication, according to another report.

If a problem such as Thompson’s stemmed from negligence, a malpractice lawsuit may be an option. But this can take time and money. And lawyers who collect only when there’s a settlement or victory may not want to take on a case unless it’s exceptionally clear that the doctor or hospital is at fault.

That creates a Catch-22 situation, said John Goldberg, a professor at Harvard Law School and an expert in tort law. “We’ll never know if something has happened because of malpractice,” he said, “because it’s not financially viable to bring a lawsuit.” That leaves the patient responsible for extra costs.

Ann and Charles Thompson maintain that he experienced an avoidable error. The hospital denied wrongdoing, Ann said, and the physician’s notes indicated the Thompsons had been advised of the risks of the procedure, including injury to the colon. She and her husband tried pursuing a lawsuit but couldn’t find a lawyer who would take the case. The hospital and the doctor who performed the test declined to comment, with the hospital citing patient privacy laws.

Read the full article on the Kaiser Health News Website!

17th Annual NPSF Patient Safety Congress Early Bird Ends March 17th!

patient safety congress

Early Bird Registration Ends March 17
17th Annual NPSF Patient Safety Congress
April 29-May 1, 2015 | Austin, TX

Save $200 if you register by March 17, 2015*

Join NPSF and their expert faculty at the only meeting with global reach and a singular focus on patient safety.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

  • Lucian L. Leape, MD, one of the founders of the National Patient Safety Foundation; chair of the NPSF Lucian Leape Institute
  • Gerald B. Hickson, MD, Senior Vice President for Quality, Safety and Risk Prevention, Joseph C. Ross Chair in Medical Education and Administration, and Assistant Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Gary S. Kaplan, MD, FACMPE, Chairman and CEO, Virginia Mason Medical Center
  • Kaveh Shojania, MD, Director of the Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, University of Toronto, and editor-in-chief of BMJ Quality & Safety
  • Allan Frankel, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Safe and Reliable Healthcare,and an author of The Essential Guide for Patient Safety Officers
  • Kim Blanton, Patient and Family Advisor, Vidant Health
  • Chrissie Blackburn, Principal Advisor, Patient and Family Engagement at University Hospitals of Cleveland
  • Beth Daley Ullem, MBA, Patient Advocate and Governance Expert, Board of Directors, ThedaCare Hospital System and Solutions for Patient Safety

PRE-CONGRESS DAY, April 29

Full-day intensive sessions:
• Certified Professional in Patient Safety (CPPS) Review Course
• Leadership Day: Safer Health Care Through Transparency
• Keeping Kidz Safe During Kare: Advancements and Lessons from Pediatrics *NEW THIS YEAR*
• Sharing and Caring: Practical Initiatives for Advancing Patient and Family Engagement
• Patient Safety Science: Successful Practices to Optimize Root Cause Analysis (RCA)

EDUCATIONAL BREAKOUT SESSIONS in six theme tracks:

• Optimizing the Benefits and Minimizing Harms of Health Technology
• Creating and Sustaining Joy, Meaning, and Safety in the Workplace
• Patient Safety in the Ambulatory Setting
• Accelerating the Cost Case for $afety
• Partnering with Patients and Families for the Safest Care
• Advancing Safety Science Implementation

We’ll also have posters, live health care simulations, networking, award presentations, and more.

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What past attendees say:
“From a participant’s perspective, this year’s NPSF Congress was one of the strongest patient safety meetings I have attended in years.”

“It was an excellent event and really highlights the shift and progress made in the wider patient safety discussion, especially over the past few years.”

“Thank you, NPSF — you crafted a thought-inspiring, provocative, robust Congress — we leave with ideas, plans, and a sense of purpose!!!”
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*Members of the American Society of Professionals in Patient Safety atNPSF or the NPSF Stand Up for Patient Safety program save even more with member discounts. Log in to npsf.org and check the member pages for the discount codes.

Register online or learn more: http://bit.ly/NPSF_17


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Dr. John James, Author of Shocking 2014 Patient Safety Article on Medical Errors, Calls for National Patient Safety Board

patient safety regulations

To mark the anniversary of the Institute of Medicine’s watershed report “To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” West Health is running a series of interviews between their Chief Medical and Science officer Dr. Joe Smith and IOM committee members who helped produce the report (which estimates 440,000 lethal errors each year including hospital acquired infections), as well as other national health experts to examine what progress has been made in reducing medical errors in the US. Do you agree that we need a National Patient Safety Board to better regulate healthcare? Leave a comment and let us know!

This week’s Q&A features John T. James, PhD, former chief toxicologist for a federal agency, who has dedicated his life to patient safety after the loss of his teenage son to medical errors in 2002. He is the author of “A Sea of Broken Hearts: Patient Rights in a Dangerous, Profit-Driven Health Care System” and founder of Patient Safety America, a website that provides information for patients on the quality of healthcare in the U.S.

Excerpt from the West Health Article:

Joe Smith: Your recent publication on medical errors in the Journal of Patient Safety has achieved widespread notice, leading to medical errors being identified as the third leading cause of death in the United States, though your background is different than many involved in patient safety efforts. Could you please describe your background and what drove your interest in this important area?

John James: I recently retired from a federal agency where I was the chief toxicologist for 25 years. I am board certified in toxicology and earned a PhD in pathology in 1981 from the University of Maryland while working at a Baltimore hospital and doing research at the National Cancer Institute. In 2002, my 19-year-old son died while running. Three weeks earlier he had been evaluated by cardiologists for five days, primarily as an in-patient after experiencing a non-fatal collapse while running. After obtaining a complete set of his medical records, I realized that multiple, catastrophic medical errors had been made by his doctors. These included failure to follow a widely published guideline for potassium replacement in patients with heart arrhythmias, failure to make an obvious diagnosis of acquired long-QT syndrome and failure to communicate to him that he should not be running. He was also denied informed consent because he was deceived about the outcome of his cardiac MRI, which had not been properly performed. I did not find this information out until long after he died.

While reading medical literature and looked for root causes, I realized that lethal medical errors are not all that uncommon. In 2000, the late Barbara Starfield, MD, estimated far more lethal medical errors than in the 1999 IOM report. I also discovered that cardiologists board certified before 1990, such as my son’s lead cardiologist, are certified for life with no requirement to demonstrate continuing competency. Furthermore, the Texas Medical Board verifies Continuing Medical Education in only one percent of doctors each year. I also learned that getting doctors, especially cardiologists, to follow evidence-based clinical guidelines is a challenge and that diagnostic errors are common, but often go unrecognized. Doctor-to-doctor and doctor-to-patient communication errors are also common and occurred in my son’s case.

JS: What role do you think government plays in combating medical errors? What agency should have oversight and be charged with reducing medical error deaths?

JJ: Overall government agencies, including Congress, have not been assertive in addressing the problem of medical errors. In some ways, the Affordable Care Act has addressed some patient safety concerns without changing the fundamental culture that permits errors to continue. Government officials can be heavily influenced by money originating from medical industry special interests. Harmed patients or their survivors contribute little to political campaigns or PACs. A new agency controlled by leaders in the patient safety movement is needed. It could be called the National Patient Safety Board, modelled to some extent after the National Transportation Safety Board or Consumer Product Safety Commission. The goal of such an agency would be to discover, track and analyze medical errors, and where appropriate, enforce changes – all in a completely transparent way. The well-known limitations and secret-keeping of state medical boards and hospital accreditation organizations would become history. In addition, the agency would enforce a national bill of rights for patients. Violations of those rights would be as serious as civil rights violations or violations of OSHA standards that put workers in harm’s way.

Other West Health Series Articles on “To Err is Human”:

  • A Look Back, Behind the Scenes of the IOM’s Report on Errors: By William Richardson, PhD, Former Chair, IOM Committee
  • A Mother’s Perspective: Q&A with Sorrel King, Founder, The Josie King Foundation
  • 15 Years Later: Q&A with Molly Coye, MD, MPH, UCLA Health
  • Uniting for Patient Safety: Q&A with Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, National Patient Safety Foundation

Read the full interview and other Patient Safety Articles on WestHealth.org!

Video of U.S. Government Subcommittee Hearing on Primary Health and Aging

Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging on medical errors

Earlier this month a team of leading patient safety experts met at a Hearing with the U.S. Senate Committee on Health Education Labor & Pensions Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging , where the topic focused on preventable medical errors: the need to improve patient safety. The recent article in the Journal of Patient Safety concluded that up to an estimated 440,000 patients die a year due to medical error. This two-hour recording is a must watch for those interested in furthering the use of medical simulation to improve patient care and reducing medical errors.

About the Subcommittee

Welcome to the Primary Health and Aging home page. The Subcommittee Chairman is Senator Bernard Sanders (I-VT) and the Ranking Member is Senator Richard Burr (R-NC). The Subcommittee has oversight over many issues including: The Older Americans Act; elder abuse, neglect, and scams affecting seniors; long-term care services for older Americans, community health centers, The Health Resources and Services Act, oral health, health care disparities, Alzheimer’s disease and family caregiving . Please visit our homepage for the latest information on Subcommittee hearings, roundtables, and links to information and resources that relate to our Subcommittee’s issues.

Panel Members

  • John James, PhD , Founder, Patient Safety America, Houston, TX
  • Ashish Jha, MD, MPH , Professor of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
  • Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH , President, National Patient Safety Foundation; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Peter Pronovost, MD, PhD , Senior Vice President for Patient Safety and Quality and Director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Joanne Disch, PhD, RN , Professor ad Honorem, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis, MN
  • Lisa McGiffert , Director, Safe Patient Project, Consumers Union, Austin, TX

Download the Subcommittee Hearing Presentations here, and learn more about the Subcommittee here.


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