Latest Healthcare Simulation News Articles From Around the World!

medical simulation news

Here’s the latest recap of healthcare simulation topics found from the global news stream:

Special Operations Medics Refine Tactical Combat Casualty CareAs a 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) battalion surgeon, Maj. Hunter Winegarner assists in the planning and execution of medical training across the Group. On April 6th, Winegarner led a group of medics through some of the most realistic training Fort Carson has to offer. To help close that gap as much as possible, Group medics use the Medical Simulation Training Center (MSTC) to provide realistic scenarios that they can work through. The MSTC provides training aids that simulate casualties who can bleed from their extremities, have difficulty breathing, and have eyes that are unresponsive to light.



WSU Provides Simulated Training to Enhance Medical Education Program: In August, Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine will debut its medical education program, which leads to a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree. The program will welcome 60 students to its charter class. “By integrating clinical, simulation, and case-based learning experiences, the College prepares graduates to lead health care teams,” says Dr. Ann Poznanski, pathologist and Associate Dean for Curriculum. “They learn to coordinate resources in new ways to improve patient care and the health of their communities.”


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Healthcare Simulation Programs in the News

simulation in the news

HealthySimulation.com loves to share the most recent news agency coverage of healthcare simulation programs around the world! The more our industry gathers public exposure and support the faster our methodology will be expected as the cultural norm, and the sooner we can improve patient safety and learning outcomes through simulation!

Here’s the latest collection of awesome medical simulation news stories from around the web:

  • Queen of the Valley Nurses Trained in Stroke Assessment with Simulators From Napa Valley Register – A “patient” named Hal has helped train some 450 nurses at Queen of the Valley Medical Center to fine-tune their stroke assessment skills. But Hal’s not human. He’s an advanced medical simulation mannequin. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, simulation training allows healthcare providers to apply theoretical knowledge in a controlled environment without risks to patients. “Simulation training supports our goal of providing patients with the highest quality of care,” said JoAnn Munski, nursing director of orthopedic, neuroscience, and rehabilitation services at the Queen. Many aspects of a real-life situation can be simulated, according to trainers Suzy Banuelos and Nancy Stump.
  • Tripler Army Medical Center Stays at Forefront of Technological Advancement From Hawaii Army Weekly – Doctors practice Laparoscopic surgery on a simulated pregnant patient in the Tripler Army Medical Center Simulation Center. The Simulation Center allows hospital staff the opportunity to hone their skills prior to a procedure in order to improve patient services. HONOLULU — Technological advancements have improved health care for years and the military Simulation (SIM) centers have strived to be at the forefront of that advance. That is why Tripler Army Medical Center recently received an upgrade to its SIM center by moving into its new facilities. This move quadrupled the workable space for the SIM center and provided the opportunity to train more staff members and obtain new equipment they didn’t have the space for prior to the move.
  • Simulation Center at Texas Children’s Hospital Prepares Doctors to Save Lives From ABC News 13 – Chief of Service in Anesthesiology, Doctor B. Wycke Baker told ABC13 these simulations are allowing team members to train for situations they might have not experienced yet in real life. “There are certain scenarios that don’t happen very often because of low frequency. But when they happen they’re very high impact,” Baker said. “So we had to resuscitate mother and deliver baby rapidly. So my role in that was the anesthesiologist, assuming care of her resuscitation, and basic and advanced cardiac life support and resuscitate her baby as well.” After every simulation, the team goes over what worked and where improvements are needed. Arnold said, “The debriefing, it is critical for learning. We’re talking about the things that went well so they can continue to do them. Were also talking about the things that didn’t go well so they can learn things for improvement on future clinical cases.”
  • Medical Education Tech Abounds at New Facility for OSU Center for Health Sciences From Tusla World – Construction on the $45 million project in west Tulsa began in October 2015 and is expected to be finished in time for this year’s fall semester. The 84,000-square-foot Tandy Medical Building will include a hospital-simulation center to provide training for students in the OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine. The simulation center will include a fully operational emergency room, operating room, intensive care unit, birthing suite and ambulance bay that will allow students to practice procedures and skills commonly used in hospitals throughout the country.

Stay tuned for more great medical simulation news with our free monthly newsletter!

New Medical Simulation Programs Get Covered in the News

simulation attention press media

Here are recap of recent news updates covering some new simulation programs across the United States and the UK:

  • Parkview Introduces Mobile Medical Simulation LabThanks to the Wabash Fire Department, which donated the ambulance late last year after upgrading its fleet, the ambulance will serve as a mobile simulation lab to provide a more realistic training experience to community hospitals and first responders. “The mobile lab will operate just as a lab in the Mirro Center would, and just as importantly, it gives us the mobility to take our training to other Parkview facilities and beyond,” said Rebecca Jensen, simulation lab manager, Parkview Mirro Center for Research and Innovation. “When we conduct off-site training, we often have to bring a lot of equipment along with us, in addition to large mannequins. We now have room to easily transport all our equipment, and we are extremely grateful to the Wabash Fire Department for giving us that flexibility.”
  • NOLA’s LSU Med Students Learn How to Save Your LifeWe can put the students into a situation where they can make mistakes, and we have people there who can correct them in their techniques and procedures,” said Dr. Richard DiCarlo, associate dean for undergraduate education. DiCarlo was largely responsible for integrating simulation into the School of Medicine’s curriculum. The technology allows students to engage in hands-on learning before they might be fully equipped to touch a living patient. In their first two years at LSU, each of the 200 medical students per class interact with the simulators on numerous occasions to learn 40 different procedural skills.

  • USC Students get Real-world Medical Experience with ‘Sim Man’The patient presented all of the usual symptoms of a heart attack for a 50-year-old male with shortness of breath, excruciating pain and the feeling of a heavy weight crushing his chest. But Denny, lying on a gurney at the front of a classroom in Upper St. Clair High School, was never in any real danger. The high-fidelity human simulator mannequin is designed to teach the students of Laura Marks’ honors organic chemistry class about the role of a pharmacist in an emergency.

  • Robot Patients Help Guide Youngsters Into Medical CareersStudents considering careers in medicine have been given an invaluable insight into life in a hospital with the help of robotic “patients”. The youngsters from schools and colleges throughout County Durham and Darlington spent the day in a purpose-built training ward at Bishop Auckland General Hospital, discussing their ambitions with doctors and careers advisers. They even had the chance to practice on life-sized talking mannequins in the hospital’s pioneering clinical simulation centre.

Is your medical simulation program getting enough media attention? Such attention can attract new learners to your institution, bring in anonymous donors, and better educate the public about the important role your center plays in modern healthcare training.

Read our comprehensive guide to “Start the Presses: How to get Media Attention to Your Healthcare Simulation Program” to learn more!


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Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond Books and Train in New $1M Healthcare Simulation Center

Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond the Books, Train in Simulation CenterAnother article showcasing how the media can cover your simulation program! Read our tutorial on how to gather such public attention for your simulation program here!

Nursing students at the Hibbing Community College (HCC) are stepping out of the classroom, into a realistic hospital room setting and learning how to treat patients in life and death situations. The newly remodeled HCC Healthcare Simulation Center opened this semester and is transforming the way students train. The state-of-the art simulation allows the students to go beyond the book and gain real-life experience that comes without the risk of working on real people.

“Students can come in and practice clinical with patients from birth all the way up to death, and they can do it in a safe environment,” explained Sandy Gustafson, nursing program director at HCC. “They can actually do the hands-on care in critical or unusual situations that they wouldn’t get in a facility that’s in a rural area.” The mannequins talk, breath, blink, cough, puke and bleed like a real human would. One of the female robots even gives birth.

“We can assess them in a way that’s different than just learning from a book because we’re just pretending there,” said Brandy Mass, a first-year nursing student. “If you don’t have that experience behind you with the simulation, then you risk the chance of freezing or not knowing what to do or drawing a blank,” said Ashton Martin, a first-year nursing student. “This prevents us from feeling that nervousness.”

You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

new tech in healthcare

Chris Merritt, recently wrote an article for McKnights News on the evolution of healthcare education through modern day technologies — which should be forwarded along to simulation discomfiters, or naysayers, in your simulation program! Chris theorizes that online gaming is the future of healthcare education!

The rapid advancements in technology continuously impact our lives on a daily basis and each new week brings a critical update to our attention. This has significantly changed the ways in which we receive and process information such as current events, the daily news, industry updates, association content, medical journals and even our educational materials. You do not need to look any further than a grade-school classroom in which personal tablets have replaced pencil and paper for our youngest generation. This transformation has occurred not because it is the cheapest alternative, in fact this migration can often times be more expensive on the front-end.

We are changing our educational delivery mechanisms due to improved learner experience, retention and overall knowledge outcomes. A 2008 study by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation reported that a great lecture can improve learning outcomes by 17%, while switching to a different delivery mechanism such as serious gaming can improve learning outcomes by 108%.

Many have acknowledged the explicit need for our healthcare professionals to have a safe environment in which to practice, make mistakes and increase their proficiency in the many critical decisions they make on a daily basis without putting a patient at risk. A 2015 study in The Journal of Clinical Nursing reported in 2015 that, “Finding a new platform to allow all nurses to practice difficult clinical decisions is key. A virtual immersive environment…can provide simulation for nurses to practice making such difficult decisions.”

The evidence is present that these online simulations increase learner engagement and retention while also resulting in improved patient outcomes and a positive impact on healthcare economics. One chronic disease specific online simulation called SiMCare Diabetes has published data which reports: improved glycemic control in patients with A1C >7%, a 60% reduction in the prescription of contraindicated medication and reduced cost by $71 per patient versus those professionals that did not train with the simulation.

Advances in medical education, clinical content, guidelines and standards of care now have a new and improved medium for dissemination. Online training simulations and educational games are continually updated in real-time and given the nature of the platform, content can be rapidly deployed around the globe with the click of a button.


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Inova Fairfax Simulation Center Helps Doctors Actually Practice Medicine

Inova Fairfax Helps Doctors Actually Practice Medicine

NBC Washington reports on a new program at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia is giving the term “practicing medicine” a new meaning:

The Inova Center for Advanced Medical Simulation is an effort to keep doctors, nurses and medical students engaged both with the latest in medical techniques as well as some of the more usual challenges in medicine. “It is a laboratory for our physicians and nurses, students, any health care professional to train, whether they’re new or whether they’re a seasoned clinician,” said Director Dr. Craig Cheifitz, who helped develop the center.

The center has 14 rooms, including an operating room, and state-of-the-art technology. “We do have very high tech mannequins, which have the ability to bleed – artificial blood, of course — voice files, can even change their vitals,” Cheifitz said.

Health care professionals work in teams and deal with everything from infectious diseases to head wounds to complicated births. The exercises are done in real time, and the center is frequently at capacity, Cheifitz said. It’s one of seven medical simulation centers in Virginia.“Medical education for years has been such that after you graduate, you might learn more from a textbook or a conference,” Cheifitz said.

Shriners New Simulation Centre in Montreal Helps Train Medical Staff

simulation center montreal

Check out this CBC News article about the simulation center in Montreal which was built with support by a local Shriners group:

There are definitely some perks to being a journalist, among them knowing that I am unlikely to ever be directly responsible for saving someone’s life. That’s good news for me – and even better news for anyone who might have depended, hypothetically, on my care. This became painfully obvious at the Shriners Hospital Wednesday as I held poor little Jose’s rubbery head in my hands as he struggled to breathe.

Health professionals have been poking and prodding Jose for several weeks, doing their best to save him from one ailment or another. He’s been lying in a bed at the Shriners’ new pediatric simulation centre at the Glen site. Jose is eight years old, and real doctors at the hospital tell me the patient is either a boy or a girl, leaving me to decide the gender. (I chose boy). I guess it’s important to point out that Jose is, first and foremost, a mannequin. No matter how badly I screwed up, I really couldn’t have made his situation worse.

Read the full story on the Canadian Broadcasting Channel News Website!


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University of South Alabama Healthcare Simulation Program Covered by Local News

medical simulation alabama

From the WKRG website: USA Health Science students are using cutting edge technology to learn how to take care of patients. In the Department of Simulation, they are using mannequins that are programmed to have real life medical problems. Twenty-five of these mannequins are so high-tech, that they can simulate a woman in labor, or a patient having a heart attack in addition to about 100 other medical conditions. Instructors even use a red substance, to put blood in their veins, and these dummies have a pulse.

Read more at the WKRG website!

*Looking to get media attention to your simulation program? Read our guide!

Times Herald Interviews Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Sean Murphy

sim tech interview(Photo: Jeffrey M. Smith, Times Herald)

Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Sean Murphy from St. Clair County Community College’s simulation center was interviewed last month about his work in our “growing field”. Check out this excerpt:

“From his seat in the glassed-in control room of St. Clair County Community College’s simulation center, Murphy manipulates computerized human stand-ins lying in hospital beds in a mock emergency ward in the next room.

At the touch of a mouse, he can make the high-fidelity dummies “breathe,” their diaphragms rising and falling. He can produce an ever-present outflow of the patient’s vital stats, forcing the student nurses to constantly monitor heart rates and blood pressure as they rush about administering I.V. fluids and life-saving medications within a critical few minutes’ time. Throughout the exercise, he and instructor-coordinator Kim Murphy observe the students’ responses that are picked up and transmitted live to control room monitors. 

Murphy said health care training using simulated patients is a growing field involving working with manufacturers and sales reps and attending conferences to stay current. Hospitals are using the training with their own employees in addition to universities, and the military uses the technology to simulate combat situations among its medical technicians.

“I see it as a growing field. It’s a new and upcoming profession, and it’s very exciting, actually,” he said.”

Read the Full Story about Sean on the Times Herald Website!

Healthcare Simulation Lab Promotional Videos Showcase Facilities, Attract Learners & Donors

simulation lab promotional videos

Highlighting some of the latest medical simulation content on the web, today we view three different approaches to medical simulation program promotional videos from Beaumont Hospital, Orlando Medical Institute, and the University of South Dakota. Such videos not only demonstrate the successful installation of new products and spaces, but act as advertising media for prospective students, patients and donors. Explore the videos below and then learn how to bring media into your own simulation labs through our dedicated “Sim Lab Media Production” post!

Beaumont Hospital:

The Applebaum Simulation Learning Institute at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak is one of the most advanced medical training facilities in North America. It’s mission is to provide world-class leadership in education using state-of-the-art technologies to improve skills for all health care providers in a safe environment.


Orlando Medical Institute:

This video is to highlight the Simulation Center and types of scenario’s that are created to enhanced our student’s learning at Orlando Medical Institute. This training is provided to EMT, Paramedic, Nurses, Physicians and Law Enforcement Personnel through the many courses that are provided.


University of South Dakota:

This new center, located in the Andrew E. Lee Memorial Medicine and Science Building on the USD campus, is a 1,700 square foot simulated hospital training center, consisting of three patient simulation rooms with adjacent observation/debriefing rooms. Human patient simulators (high-tech mannequins) can be manipulated from a control room.

Learn how to add media to your Simulation Program website here!