Jump Trading Simulation Program Explores Collaborative Relationship with U.S. Air Force

osf innovation u.s. air force

Jump Simulation, hosts of the 2016 SimGHOSTS USA conference, announced recently that they are actively seeking training opportunities with the U.S Air Force. Such partnerships are crucial for the success of your program, and the field of simulation as a whole!

The reputation of Jump Simulation, a part of OSF Innovation, as being a leader in health care education and training is beginning to expand outside of the medical industry. The facility on the campus of OSF Saint Francis Medical Center recently hosted Brigadier General Lee Payne, the Surgeon General for Air Mobility Command (AMC). AMC is responsible for airlift, air refueling, and all aeromedical evacuation (aka life flight) for the U.S. Air Force. General Payne is the equivalent of a Chief Medical Officer for a health care system as large as OSF HealthCare.

He’s responsible for 12 locations around the world in providing medical benefits and coverage for active duty members, their families and retirees—amounting to about 450,000 people. He oversees more than one billion dollars’ worth of assets and an operating budget worth hundreds of millions of dollars. In addition to delivering superior health care every day, Gen Payne is also responsible for ensuring his teams are able to deploy in a moment’s notice anywhere around the world – often to very challenging post-natural disaster environments General Payne and his team, based out of Scott Air Force Base in southern Illinois, requested to visit Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center to see the space, meet the staff behind the innovative work taking place and explore ways the two organizations might collaborate in the future.


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“Areas we are looking to explore right now include inviting them to our simulation facilitator course, “ said Don Halpin, Health Care Systems Engineering and Sociotech Innovation Program Manager for Jump Simulation. “They would like to see how we run our sims and how we debrief our learners in the simulation environment. In turn, they are inviting us out to see their simulation system in the Air Force and what they do to get ready for people to deploy to austere environments.”

Overall, Halpin says his hope is that Air Mobility Command and Jump Simulation can work together in the future to solve health care problems and improve care for patients.

Learn more about Jump and OSF Healthcare here!


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SimGHOSTS USA 2016 Day 2 Opens with Laerdal Sponsored Plenary Address From ASPE President

simghosts aspe standardized patients

Today at SimGHOSTS 2016 USA Laerdal Medical sponsored the opening plenary address by Grace Gephart Director, PULSE Center at Arkansas Children’s Hospital and ASPE President.

About Grace

Grace Gephardt, MEd is the Director of the PULSE Simulation Center at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. She joined the PULSE Center in 2007 as their Standardized Patient Educator and became the Director in 2013. In her tenure, she has been involved in creating and implementing numerous comprehensive simulation scenarios for multidisciplinary use, including the development and launching of a national training in patient/family communications for pediatric chaplains. In 2014, she was nominated for and received the ‘Outstanding SP Educator of the Year’ award from the Association of Standardized Patient Educators and currently serves as President on the organization’s Board of Directors. Grace is also a member of SSH, SESAM and SimGHOSTS.

About ASPE

In 1963 a neurologist by the name of Howard Barrows discovered that a lay person could be trained to simulate illness and give feedback to medical students about their history and communication skills. He called this person a simulated patient and defined it as “a person who has been carefully coached to simulate an actual patient so accurately that the simulation cannot be detected by a skilled clinician. In performing the simulation, the SP presents the gestalt of the patient being simulated; not just the history, but the body language, the physical findings, and the emotional and personality characteristics as well.” Gradually, the use of the simulated patient began to grow in medical education. Educators found that simulated patients offered not only a variety of teaching opportunities for students, but also opportunities for testing student performance. Out of this testing environment grew the term “standardized patient” or “SP.”

As Gayle Gliva-McConvey explains, “An SP is a person trained to portray a patient scenario, or an actual patient using their own history and physical exam findings, for the instruction, assessment, or practice of communication and/or examining skills of a health care provider. In the health and medical sciences, SPs are used to provide a safe and supportive environment conducive for learning or for standardized assessments. SPs can serve as practice models, or participate in sophisticated assessment and feedback of learner’s abilities or services. The use of simulated scenarios involving humans is rapidly expanding to meet the needs of many high-risk service fields outside of human health care.” As simulated/standardized patient methodology grew, educators felt a need to develop an organization that could foster the growth of the profession that was creating and supporting this new methodology. Thus, in 2001, the Association of Standardized Patients was formed.

Since that time, our membership has grown along with the concept of standardized patients. Its use has expanded into many fields including dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and allied health professions. Over the last decade, three simulation modalities have become intertwined – scenarios may now include SPs, task trainers and/or manikins; commonly known as “hybrid” simulations.

About Laerdal

The Laerdal Company was established in 1940. During our first two decades, we created innovative toys and books for children. In 1958, the company started to dedicate itself to advancing the cause of resuscitation and emergency care. In 1960, the first patient simulator Resusci Anne manikin was introduced to the market. A new logo was needed to reflect our mission. Our founder, Åsmund S. Laerdal, chose the image of the Good Samaritan. It depicts the ancient tale of the traveller whose selfless compassion and care saved the life of a total stranger. This became our emblem and our inspiration.

Today, Laerdal Medical is dedicated to helping save lives with product solutions, services, and system solutions that support the Chain of Survival. The Good Samaritan logo symbolizes our commitment to every health professional and volunteer who has learned how to save the life of a family member, friend, or stranger in need. The vision of Laerdal is that no-one should die or be disabled unnecessarily during birth or from sudden illness or trauma. Since its creation of the pioneering, and now world famous CPR practise manikin in 1960, the Resusci Anne; many more innovative products have followed to improve and support education for Healthcare Professionals around the world, as well as facilitate the spread of CPR knowledge and skills to the would be Samaritan in the wider lay community.

Laerdal has developed break-through technologies that have helped to define its portfolio of simulation, micro-simulation, virtual reality, automated external defibrillators and emergency therapeutic products as reputable market leaders. Other well-known brands include SimMan,SimBaby, SimNewB, HeartStart, Q-CPR, Stifneck, the Pocket Mask and BaXstrap.

Learn more about ASPE and follow #SG16USA for all the latest!

Chicago Sun Times Sits Down with Sim Entrepreneur Dr. John Vozenilek

john vozenilek

This weekend Sandra Guy of the Chicago Sun Times did a piece on Jump Trading Simulation Center Director and SimNext Chief Strategy Officer Dr. John Vozenilek. As the Vice President and Chief Medical Officer for Simulation at Jump, Dr. Vozenilek provides central coordination and oversight for OSF HealthCare undergraduate, graduate, interdisciplinary, and continuing medical education programs.

The Peoria-based innovative Jump Trading Simulation Center is the host of the 6th annual hands-on healthcare simulation technology training event SimGHOSTS, taking place August 2nd-5th which you can learn all about on SimGHOSTS.org.

Under John’s direction, OSF HealthCare and University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria has created additional organizational capabilities and infrastructure, building resources for educators who wish to use innovative learning technologies for teaching and assessment. Dr. Vozenilek is actively involved in the academic programs across traditional departmental boundaries and in clinical practice at OSF. In addition to his role in simulation, Dr. Vozenilek serves as faculty teaching in formal programs in engineering, healthcare quality, and safety.

About SimNext

SIMnext is working directly with clinicians and guided by real-time patient data to provide the bridge between learning environments and real-life clinical experience. Our company is built on a culture of open, agile exploration with partners, including the University of Illinois Schools of Medicine and Engineering and the OSF Healthcare System, that enables our team of engineering, medical and business experts to aggressively pursue answers to complex healthcare simulation and training problems. Through this model we are able to offer our partners and clients fully tested, nuanced products that are the key to developing expertise.

Interview Excerpt:

Q: So a nurse uses the curriculum on a tablet, rather than rely on something learned in a lecture hall?

A: “Nurses are constantly working with machines, whether that’s a dialysis machine or programming ventilators or smart pumps. Studies show that, about one in five times, small errors can occur. Most of the time, they don’t affect patients, thank goodness. But when they do, it can be devastating. Our company’s curriculum on a tablet lets the nurses do a safety double-check at the moment it’s most important. We’re receiving orders from medical schools, nursing schools and academic medical centers. We’re distributing the products in eight countries.

We produce free 3-D models of the upper torso to train in life-saving airway surgeries, free models of congenital heart disease so it can be treated, and we sell the DR Doppler ultrasound training device that gives simulations of blood flow starting at $500.”

Learn more about Dr.Vozenilek through the Chicago Sun Times Interview,
SimNext Products and the Jump Trading Simulation Center!


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