INACSL’s Latest Simulation in Nursing Journal Highlights Standardized Patients

nursing simulation journal

Suzie Kardong-Edgren, Director of the RISE Center at Robert Morris University, Drexel Faculty member, and INACSL Simulation in Nursing Journal editor recently shared “Standardized Patients have been a part of health professional education for over 50 years now. As an educational field that continues to grow in scholarship and practice, the editors of Clinical Simulation in Nursing feel the time is right to dedicate a special issue to examining ongoing contributions, share best practices and honour debates within the live simulation field relevant to its practitioners and health professional educators more broadly.”

INACL invites health professionals who are engaging standardized patients (SPs) in simulation education to submit manuscripts for a special issue to be published in July 2017.

Nancy McNaughton, M.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Director, Standardized Patient Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto and Mindi Anderson, PhD, ARNP, CPNP-PC, CNE, CHSE-A, ANEF, University of Central Florida College of Nursing will serve as the guest editors for this special issue.



When submitting manuscripts for this special issue, please select “special issue” when the choices appear.

Clinical Simulation in Nursing is the flagship journal of the International Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning. The journal provides a forum for research, innovation, review, and debate in simulation. The journal is dedicated to the advancement of simulation as an educational strategy to improve patient care. A double blind peer-review process is used for all submissions.

Manuscripts for consideration should be submitted to Clinical Simulation in Nursing (www.nursingsimulation.org) by 15 February, 2017.


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Supporting Transitions in Medical Career Pathways: the Role of Simulation-Based Education

advances in simulation journal

This article is also translated in Spanish!

Have you checked out the Advances in Simulation journal yet? Great news it’s free for everyone online thanks to the folks at SESAM! Just finished reviewing “Supporting transitions in medical career pathways: the role of simulation-based education” by Jennifer Cleland et al., and found it very useful for us all to consider!

About Advances in Simulation Journal

Advances in Simulation provides a forum to share scholarly practice to advance the use of simulation in the context of health and social care. Advances in Simulation publishes articles that cover all science and social science disciplines, all health and social care professions and multi- and inter-professional studies. The journal includes articles relevant to simulation that include the study of health care practice, human factors, psychology, sociology, anthropology, communication, teamwork, human performance, education, learning technology, economics, biomedical engineering, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, therapeutics, scientific computation, simulation modelling, population studies, theatre, craft, program evaluation and more.

Abstract

Transitions, or periods of change, in medical career pathways can be challenging episodes, requiring the transitioning clinician to take on new roles and responsibilities, adapt to new cultural dynamics, change behaviour patterns, and successfully manage uncertainty. These intensive learning periods present risks to patient safety. Simulation-based education (SBE) is a pedagogic approach that allows clinicians to practise their technical and non-technical skills in a safe environment to increase preparedness for practice. In this commentary, we present the potential uses, strengths, and limitations of SBE for supporting transitions across medical career pathways, discussing educational utility, outcome and process evaluation, and cost and value, and introduce a new perspective on considering the gains from SBE. We provide case-study examples of the application of SBE to illustrate these points and stimulate discussion.

Conclusions

Increasing doctors’ preparedness to perform the skills and behaviours required to fulfil the responsibilities of any new role is important for patient safety, service efficiency, and individual psychological well-being. Whilst true mastery of a role cannot be achieved until one is immersed within the workplace itself [6], the literature indicates that we can go some way to preparing individuals for the technical and non-technical elements of any new role, and indeed the associated psychological challenges, through the judicious and imaginative use of SBE. In this paper, we have provided an overview of some of the key factors associated with planning and evaluating SBE for transitions.

We have also highlighted a number of areas for future research in SBE to support medical career transitions. These include the development of understanding around the practical factors to be considered when designing SBE, ranging from the delivery of feedback and the incorporation of longer term outcome measures to analysis of the cost-effectiveness of the approach being undertaken, as well as the socio-cultural influences on learning in simulated settings. We urge those working in SBE research to consider how best to identify and evaluate concrete specific outcomes of SBE for this purpose. There remains the need for further investigation into the use of SBE to support the transition from medical student to junior doctor, but we urge those working in this area to not neglect examining the use of SBE to support later medical career transitions where “learners” are working with less supervision and increasing responsibility yet where (largely non-technical) issues pertinent to patient safety remain apparent.

Read the full article on the Advances in Simulation Journal

SSH Simulation in Healthcare Journal Publishes April Edition on Simulations for Communicable Diseases

healthcare simulation journal

Just received word that the latest issue (April 2016 – Volume 11 – Issue 2) of the Simulation in Healthcare Journal has been published. This journal is connected to the Society in Simulation in Healthcare. Over the next few months we will be reminding you about all the established and new journals out there relevant to those engaging in healthcare simulation. Stay tuned for more! Here is the articles in this issue, which focused on communicable disease Management:

Editorial

  • Introduction to Special Issue on Highly Communicable Disease Management Gaba, David M.
  • Ebola: Urgent Need, Rapid Response Adams, Jennifer J.; Lisco, Steven J.

Highly Communicable Disease Management Theme Issue

  • Health Worker Focused Distributed Simulation for Improving Capability of Health Systems in Liberia Gale, Thomas C. E.; Chatterjee, Arunangsu; Mellor, Nicholas E.; Allan, Richard J.
  • Rapid Development and Deployment of Ebola Readiness Training Across an Academic Health System: The Critical Role of Simulation Education, Consulting, and Systems Integration Phrampus, Paul E.; O’Donnell, John M.; Farkas, Deborah; Abernethy, Denise; Brownlee, Katherine; Dongilli, Thomas; Martin, Susan
  • Simulation as a Tool to Facilitate Practice Changes in Teams Taking Care of Patients Under Investigation for Ebola Virus Disease in Spain Rojo, Elena; Oruña, Clara; Sierra, Dolores; García, Gema; Del Moral, Ignacio; Maestre, Jose M.
  • Use of Simulation to Gauge Preparedness for Ebola at a Free-Standing Children’s Hospital Biddell, Elizabeth A.; Vandersall, Brian L.; Bailes, Stephanie A.; Estephan, Stephanie A.; Ferrara, Lori A.; Nagy, Kristine M.; O’Connell, Joyce L.; Patterson, Mary D.
  • Beating the Spread: Developing a Simulation Analog for Contagious Body Fluids Drew, Jonathan L.; Turner, Joseph; Mugele, Joshua; Hasty, Greg; Duncan, Taylor; Zaiser, Rebekah; Cooper, Dylan
  • Ebola Virus Disease Simulation Case Series: Patient With Ebola Virus Disease in the Prodromal Phase of Illness (Scenario 1), the “Wet” Gastrointestinal Phase of Illness (Scenario 2), and the Late, Critically Ill Phase of Disease (Scenario 3) Delaney, Heather M.; Lucero, Pedro F.; Maves, Ryan C.; Lawler, James V.; Maddry, Joseph K.; Biever, Kimberlie A.; Womble, Shannon G.; Coffman, Robert V.; Murray, Clinton K.

Empirical Investigations

  • Making an “Attitude Adjustment”: Using a Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Education Strategy to Improve Attitudes Toward Teamwork and Communication Wong, Ambrose Hon-Wai; Gang, Maureen; Szyld, Demian; Mahoney, Heather
  • The Correlation of Workplace Simulation-Based Assessments With Interns’ Infant Lumbar Puncture Success: A Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Study Auerbach, Marc; Fein, Daniel M.; Chang, Todd P.; Gerard, James; Zaveri, Pavan; Grossman, Devin; Van Ittersum, Wendy; Rocker, Joshua; Whitfill, Travis; Pusic, Martin; Kessler, David O.; for the INSPIRE LP Investigators Quantitative Feedback Facilitates Acquisition of Skills in Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Skinner, Alisha A.; Freeman, Rosario V.; Sheehan, Florence H.

Technical Report

  • A Hemodynamic Monitor as a Simulation Tool, a Novel Use of the PiCCO2: Technical Description of the Method and Its Application Eghiaian, Alexandre; Lanceleur, Antony; Le Maho, Anne Laure; Pouilly, Arnaud; de Kerlidy, Pierre Meudal; Blondel, Pascal; Suria, Stéphanie; Cerf, Charles

Erratum

Developing a Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Curriculum: Lessons From 11 Years of Advanced Cardiac Life Support: Erratum

Check out the complete Simulation in Healthcare Journal Here!


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BioMedCentral Interviews Advances in Simulation Editor Debra Nestel on Launch of New Journal

advances in simulation

Exciting news announced at IMSH 2016 by Debra Nestel and SESAM that a new Journal “Advances in Simulation” was launched during the event! BioMedCentral.com interviewed Professor Nestel about this new publication and the future of medical simulation. Debra Nestel is Professor of Simulation Education in Health Care at Monash University, Australia. For over 25 years she has used simulation as an educational method in the context of health care. Professor Nestel has a particular interest in human-based simulations and is experienced in research and development of several simulation modalities.

BioMedCentral.com Asked Debra, “What do you hope will be achieved in the field in the next ten years”?

The seeds of the achievements for the next decade are likely to be planted now. I’ll offer five ideas:

  • First, there is already sufficient simulation research to enable meaningful reviews. This is likely to lead to new theories (of the middle range rather than unified) that will shape further research and the work of simulation practitioners.
  • Second, we will see simulation embedded in curricula for all health and social care professionals. Access to simulation will widen and a greater breadth of modalities will be adopted.
  • Third, professional development for simulation practitioners will lead to greater simulation specialism with a parallel advance of all clinical teachers at minimum thinking about using simulation to design learning activities.
  • Fourth, there will be really exciting developments in technology-based simulations, especially with augmented and virtual realities.
  • Fifth, simulation will form part of patient (and where appropriate their carers) education as well as providing ways of giving the wider community access to health and social care practices such that they may help improve the very services designed for them.
  • Finally, all of these achievements will contribute directly or indirectly to improving patient safety.

Learn more about the new AiS Journal here and Read the Full BioMedCentral Article here!

MEdSim Magazine Advances Patient Safety Through Education and Training

medical simulation journal

Have you heard of MEdSim Magazine yet? MEdSim Magazine aims to promote the best education and training practices for the next generation of healthcare professionals. As a division of the world famous simulation group Halldale Media, the MEdSim professional publication covers topics specific to our world of medical simulation. In the past year I have attended two of Halldale’s simulation events including their new Healthcare Education Assessment Training and Technology (HEATT) meeting and their World Aviation Training & Simulation (WATS) conference, both of which were fantastic learning opportunities. Check out the latest copy below or visit the Halldale website to sign up for past and future editions.

About MEdSim Magazine:

MEdSim Magazine is written by professionals in medicine, simulation and training who are recognized leaders with a lifetime of experience.  MEdSim addresses the needs of medical practitioners, educators, and academicians around the world. MEdSim features innovative healthcare practice: it covers the latest simulations developed to train different medical professionals at different stages of their education and curriculum advancement to highlight the knowledge and skills needed to ensure patient safety and reduce healthcare cost.

Check out the latest edition and sign up to receive your MEdSim Magazine today!


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Free Medical Simulation Newsletter Crosses 2,500 Subscribers

medical simulation journal

More than 2,500 medical simulation champions from around the world now subscribe to HealthySimulation.com’s free monthly newsletter. This free email provides a monthly recap of all the “best of” content that gets posted on the free medical simulation resource website HealthySimulation.com. Simulation news, resources, links, tutorials, video interviews, product demos, and more are highlighted to subscribers in an easy-to-read newsletter. You can easily subscribe through the form below:

Subscribers also get free access to the opening session of HealthySimAdmin, valued at $150, an HD-recorded event which brought together administrators from a dynamic range of medical simulation programs to specifically focus on management issues identified by our community.

The HealthySim newsletter is only sent out once a month and is full of original content specifically linked to medical simulation – so join over 2,500 of your peers today and get the best of HealthySimulation.com!

Joint Commission Journal Publishes “Eight Critical Factors in Creating and Implementing a Successful Simulation Program”

Recently the The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety published an article by Elizabeth H. Lazzara, PhD; Lauren E. Benishek; Aaron S. Dietz, MA; Eduardo Salas, PhD; David J. Adriansen, EdD, NREMT entitled “Eight Critical Factors in Creating and Implementing a Successful Simulation Program under their Teamwork and Communication series.  The article, available for free online, provides numerous tips for the eight key topic areas suggested as necessary to create a successful medical simulation program.

medical simulation success factors

Article-at-a-Glance:

Background: Recognizing the need to minimize human error and adverse events, clinicians, researchers, administrators, and educators have strived to enhance clinicians’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes through training. Given the risks inherent in learning new skills or advancing underdeveloped skills on actual patients, simulation-based training (SBT) has become an invaluable tool across the medical education spectrum. The large simulation, training, and learning literature was used to provide a synthesized yet innovative and “memorable” heuristic of the important facets of simulation program creation and implementation, as represented by eight critical “S” factors—science, staff, supplies, space, support, systems, success, and sustainability. These critical factors advance earlier work that primarily focused on the science of SBT success, to also include more practical, perhaps even seemingly obvious but significantly challenging components of SBT, such as resources, space, and supplies.

Systems: One of the eight critical factors—systems—refers to the need to match fidelity requirements to training needs and ensure that technological infrastructure is in place. The type of learning objectives that the training is intended to address should determine these requirements. For example, some simulators emphasize physical fidelity to enable clinicians to practice technical and nontechnical skills in a safe environment that mirrors real-world conditions. Such simulators are most appropriate when trainees are learning how to use specific equipment or conduct specific procedures.

Conclusion: The eight factors—science, staff, supplies, space, support, systems, success, and sustainability—represent a synthesis of the most critical elements necessary for successful simulation programs. The order of the factors does not represent a deliberate prioritization or sequence, and the factors’ relative importance may change as the program evolves.

Read the entire Eight Critical Factors in Creating and Implementing a Successful Simulation Program Article here!


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Simulation in Healthcare Education: A Best Evidence Practical Guide

medical simulation management

Dr. Barry Issenberg, Director of the Gordon Medical Simulation Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and co-author of AMEE Guide #82 “Simulation in Healthcare Education: A Best Evidence Practical Guide PART-2″ reminds us here of the importance of considering the practical implementation of medical simulation. While Part-1 focused on simulation program development and operations, part-2 focuses on clinical educators and getting ROI on learning outcomes. Think of these articles as a great “How To Get Started” guide to medical simulation!

Simulation in Healthcare Education: A Best Evidence Practical Guide Part -2 Abstract:

Over the past two decades, there has been an exponential and enthusiastic adoption of simulation in healthcare education internationally. Medicine has learned much from professions that have established programs in simulation for training, such as aviation, the military and space exploration. Increased demands on training hours, limited patient encounters, and a focus on patient safety have led to a new paradigm of education in healthcare that increasingly involves technology and innovative ways to provide a standardized curriculum. A robust body of literature is growing, seeking to answer the question of how best to use simulation in healthcare education. Building on the groundwork of the Best Evidence in Medical Education (BEME) Guide on the features of simulators that lead to effective learning, this current Guide provides practical guidance to aid educators in effectively using simulation for training. It is a selective review to describe best practices and illustrative case studies.

This Guide is the second part of a two-part AMEE Guide on simulation in healthcare education. The first Guide focuses on building a simulation program, and discusses more operational topics such as types of simulators, simulation center structure and set-up, fidelity management, and scenario engineering, as well as faculty preparation. This Guide will focus on the educational principles that lead to effective learning, and include topics such as feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, and curriculum integration – all central to simulation efficacy. The important subjects of mastery learning, range of difficulty, capturing clinical variation, and individualized learning are also examined. Finally, we discuss approaches to team training and suggest future directions. Each section follows a framework of background and definition, its importance to effective use of simulation, practical points with examples, and challenges generally encountered. Simulation-based healthcare education has great potential for use throughout the healthcare education continuum, from undergraduate to continuing education. It can also be used to train a variety of healthcare providers in different disciplines from novices to experts. This Guide aims to equip healthcare educators with the tools to use this learning modality to its full capability.

To download part-2 of the FREE article visit here. Part-1 is located here.

Latest Clinical Simulation in Nursing Journal Published

Have you ever read the International Nursing Association’s Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL.Org) “Clinical Simulation in Nursing” journal? This monthly research and publication journal has a plethora of great healthcare simulation peer-reviewed content.

nursing simulation journal

Touching on this year’s INACSL 2013 keynote address which you can review here, Clinical Simulation in Nursing’s Editor-in-Chief Suzie Kardong-Edgren, PhD, RN, ANEF, CHSE covered in this month’s Editorial how Nursing can use simulation as an evidence-based practice tool:

“Were you as impressed as I was with Bernadette Melnyk’s keynote address at the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning conference in June? Melnyk mentioned an outstanding article by one of our own society’s board members, Michelle Aebersold. 

Aebersold (2010) provides a roadmap for the introduction and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) guidelines into hospitals. One could argue the same thing could be done to refresh academic clinical education faculty. Many staff nurses and faculty tend to maintain their clinical practice based on what they were originally taught. However, many recent important research discoveries that directly impact patient care are made and published, but sit in unread journals, piling up next to the bed on the nightstand, in the bathroom, underneath the couch…it happens to everyone. Thus, it is not uncommon that our patients are not benefitting from current best clinical practices. To compound this problem, many hospitals reflexively cut back education department clinicians every time there is a need for cost saving, further eroding practicing nurses’ access to those paid to keep us current, in best practices.

Best EBP guidelines can be introduced, implemented, and reinforced using simulation. Aebersold wrote a scenario using the current EBP guidelines for nurses to recognize and treat sepsis. Although many nurses correctly diagnosed sepsis during the simulation, only half treated the patient correctly, using the current EBP guidelines for sepsis. Nurses unaware of the changes in sepsis care practice were updated during the debriefing process and left feeling positive and educated.”

If you are a member of INACSL you can read the rest of Suzie’s article or check out any of these awesome topics in the November issue:

If you are not a member and are a Nurse Educators utilizing simulation, you should strongly consider joining INACSL today!

Free Journal Promotes Educational Technology

Last week Suzie Kardong-Edgren PhD, RN, ANEF, editor of the Clinical Simulation in Nursing Journal shared with INACSL the Journal of Educational Technology & Society.

journal for simulation technology education

From the website:

Educational Technology & Society is a quarterly journal (January, April, July and October).

Educational Technology & Society seeks academic articles on the issues affecting the developers of educational systems and educators who implement and manage such systems. The articles should discuss the perspectives of both communities and their relation to each other:

  • Educators aim to use technology to enhance individual learning as well as to achieve widespread education and expect the technology to blend with their individual approach to instruction. However, most educators are not fully aware of the benefits that may be obtained by proactively harnessing the available technologies and how they might be able to influence further developments through systematic feedback and suggestions.
  • Educational system developers and artificial intelligence (AI) researchers are sometimes unaware of the needs and requirements of typical teachers, with a possible exception of those in the computer science domain. In transferring the notion of a ‘user’ from the human-computer interaction studies and assigning it to the ‘student’, the educator’s role as the ‘implementer/ manager/ user’ of the technology has been forgotten.

The aim of the journal is to help them better understand each other’s role in the overall process of education and how they may support each other. The articles should be original, unpublished, and not in consideration for publication elsewhere at the time of submission to Educational Technology & Society and four months thereafter.

The FREE journal includes serveral topics on Simulation and Healthcare Educational Technology so be sure to check it out!