New Healthcare Simulation Podcast Interviews HealthySimulation Founder Regarding Benefits of Video Production

medical simulation podcast

Hey Sim Champs! An awesome new healthcare simulation resource for you to check out today from our friends at Simulcast: Victoria Brazil and Jesse Spur! In these ad hoc mini-episodes the team attempts to “pause and discuss” a topic of interest in the simulation community, highlight upcoming conferences, grab vox pop style interviews with great simulationistas and generally stop, take five and appraise the landscape.

Victoria is an emergency physician and medical educator. Victoria is an enthusiast in the social media and FOAM world and a keen runner. Jesse is founder and editor of injectableorange.com blog and podcast, the Director of Simulation Education for the Teaching Institute, and a novice social media, simulation, and quality assurance researcher. Together they are providing audio interviews around the world with those engaging in healthcare simulation.

From Victoria & Simulcast:


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On Day 2 of APMSH I attended a fascinating workshop with Lance Baily of SimGHOSTS.org and HealthySimulation.com fame. Lance works out of Las Vegas and has established a global reputation in the technical aspects of conducting simulation, for maximal learning effect. Some of these skills are drawn from his previous life working in Hollywood, and our workshop was based on some of those:

  • Getting the right camera angle
  • Using tripods
  • Thinking about sound

Other Simulcast Resources include the Simulcast Journal Club, which is a monthly series heavily inspired by the ALiEM MEdIC Series. It aims to encourage simulation educators to explore and learn from publications on Healthcare Simulation Education. Each month we will publish a case and link a paper with associated questions for discussion. We will moderate and summarise the discussion at the end of the month, including exploring the opinions of experts from the field.

You can check out Lance’s interview there and connect with additional resources on the Simulcast website!


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ABC Covers Hillsborough Community College’s New Simulation Suite

medical simulation news story

Check out this local news story from ABC about the The  which has just created a “Simulation Suite.” The new lab is designed to look and feel like a real hospital, and gives students the chance to perform medical produces and diagnoses on dummy patients.

Hillsborough Community College (HCC) is now home to a fully functional, state-of-the-art health sciences simulation suite. Designed to simulate a hospital setting, the HCC simulation suite allows students to apply classroom concepts within a simulated clinical environment. Florida’s aging population is growing and so is the demand for the healthcare professionals who care for them. The simulation suite is currently being used to train respiratory, EMS and nursing students.

The students use life-sized, anatomically correct manikins in a number of settings to simulate a number of situations including, but not limited to, trauma with bleeding, childbirth and chest pain with cardiac arrest. According to the Florida Center for Nursing, “Statewide estimates for vacant nurse positions in the industries studied have increased since the 2013 survey with nearly 12,500 vacant RN positions, 2,654 vacant LPN positions, and 3,111 vacant CNA positions as of June 30, 2015.” This simulation suite will help train and prepare the next generation of professionals to provide care for patients.

“I can practice this and the mannequin is not going to judge me,” said Molly Gonzalez with a smile. On Wednesday, Gonzalez and her classmates got to use the lab for the first time since it was completed this summer. These kinds of labs are a popular training tool for colleges across the country, so if the HCC’s students were going to compete, the school needed to upgrade. Having the simulation lab now allows these students to get quality EMS and nursing education at community college prices. And gets them to working in this in-demand field very quickly.

Learn How to Gain Similar Media Attention for Your Sim Lab!

Peak TV Show Covers St. Luke’s University Health Network Simulation Medical School

simulation center interview

Medical simulation helps bridge the gap between classroom learning and real-life hands on experience for medical students. Joining us in the studio is Dr. Joel Rosenfeld, Chief Academic Officer for Temple University Medical School at St. Luke’s.

The PEAK is the Greater Lehigh Valley’s PREMIER lifestyle show featuring the latest medical news, personal fitness, healthy cooking and eating, exciting places and trends, and giving back in our community! If it’s innovative, informative, and fun — you’ll find it on The PEAK!

About St. Luke’s Simulation Center

State-of-the-art clinical simulation centers, located at both the Philadelphia North Broad Street and the Bethlehem St. Luke’s campuses, provide students with outstanding opportunities to develop their clinical and procedural skills. These centers include both robotic simulators and standardized patients as well as a variety of procedural skills training equipment. High fidelity, programmable robotic simulators imitate physiologic and clinical scenarios that clinicians may encounter. Small groups of students work together to assess the “patient’s” problem and to develop and implement a management plan.

A faculty member observes the group, then debriefs the students about the encounter to develop their skills for future encounters with patients. Students develop their history-taking and physical examination skills and professional behaviors through sessions with standardized patients and patient instructors. The opportunity to work first with standardized patients (who simulate real medical cases) helps to build students’ confidence towards the time when they will encounter real patients. Life-like task trainers (arms, head/neck, torsos, and other portions of the body) allow students to build their skills in performing a range of procedures such as phlebotomy, airway management, suturing, and urinary catheterization.

Students interested in surgery may begin to develop basic surgical skills during their preclinical years by participating in surgical interest groups and electives.

Learn How to Gain Media Attention for Your Sim Lab!


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Hull Institute of Learning and Simulation Featured on ITN Show ‘Doctors of the Future’

hull institute of learning and simulation

Check out this awesome ITN (UK’s Independent Television Network) interview of the Hull Institute of Learning and Simulation Center! Healthcare professionals are using simulation training at the Hull Institute of Learning and Simulation to continue their professional development, improving patient care. This video is part of the Royal Society of Medicine’s news-style programme ‘Doctors of the Future’, produced in partnership with ITN Productions.

About Doctors of the Future

In a unique communications partnership, the Royal Society of Medicine and ITN Productions have launched a news and current affairs-style programme. ‘Doctors of the Future’ looks at the transformations in medical education as well as innovations in medical research and technologies that will shape the healthcare of tomorrow.

The programme premiered at the 12th Medical Innovations Summit on Saturday 16th April 2016 at The Royal Society of Medicine. Watch the reaction to the programme here. Introduced by national newsreader Natasha Kaplinsky, the programme features key industry interviews and news-style reports, along with sponsored editorial profiles of some of the leading organisations in the sector.

Learn more about the Hull Simulation Center here and
Watch the full Doctors of the Future Program here! 

Times Herald Interviews Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Sean Murphy

sim tech interview(Photo: Jeffrey M. Smith, Times Herald)

Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Sean Murphy from St. Clair County Community College’s simulation center was interviewed last month about his work in our “growing field”. Check out this excerpt:

“From his seat in the glassed-in control room of St. Clair County Community College’s simulation center, Murphy manipulates computerized human stand-ins lying in hospital beds in a mock emergency ward in the next room.

At the touch of a mouse, he can make the high-fidelity dummies “breathe,” their diaphragms rising and falling. He can produce an ever-present outflow of the patient’s vital stats, forcing the student nurses to constantly monitor heart rates and blood pressure as they rush about administering I.V. fluids and life-saving medications within a critical few minutes’ time. Throughout the exercise, he and instructor-coordinator Kim Murphy observe the students’ responses that are picked up and transmitted live to control room monitors. 

Murphy said health care training using simulated patients is a growing field involving working with manufacturers and sales reps and attending conferences to stay current. Hospitals are using the training with their own employees in addition to universities, and the military uses the technology to simulate combat situations among its medical technicians.

“I see it as a growing field. It’s a new and upcoming profession, and it’s very exciting, actually,” he said.”

Read the Full Story about Sean on the Times Herald Website!


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Chicago Sun Times Sits Down with Sim Entrepreneur Dr. John Vozenilek

john vozenilek

This weekend Sandra Guy of the Chicago Sun Times did a piece on Jump Trading Simulation Center Director and SimNext Chief Strategy Officer Dr. John Vozenilek. As the Vice President and Chief Medical Officer for Simulation at Jump, Dr. Vozenilek provides central coordination and oversight for OSF HealthCare undergraduate, graduate, interdisciplinary, and continuing medical education programs.

The Peoria-based innovative Jump Trading Simulation Center is the host of the 6th annual hands-on healthcare simulation technology training event SimGHOSTS, taking place August 2nd-5th which you can learn all about on SimGHOSTS.org.

Under John’s direction, OSF HealthCare and University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria has created additional organizational capabilities and infrastructure, building resources for educators who wish to use innovative learning technologies for teaching and assessment. Dr. Vozenilek is actively involved in the academic programs across traditional departmental boundaries and in clinical practice at OSF. In addition to his role in simulation, Dr. Vozenilek serves as faculty teaching in formal programs in engineering, healthcare quality, and safety.

About SimNext

SIMnext is working directly with clinicians and guided by real-time patient data to provide the bridge between learning environments and real-life clinical experience. Our company is built on a culture of open, agile exploration with partners, including the University of Illinois Schools of Medicine and Engineering and the OSF Healthcare System, that enables our team of engineering, medical and business experts to aggressively pursue answers to complex healthcare simulation and training problems. Through this model we are able to offer our partners and clients fully tested, nuanced products that are the key to developing expertise.

Interview Excerpt:

Q: So a nurse uses the curriculum on a tablet, rather than rely on something learned in a lecture hall?

A: “Nurses are constantly working with machines, whether that’s a dialysis machine or programming ventilators or smart pumps. Studies show that, about one in five times, small errors can occur. Most of the time, they don’t affect patients, thank goodness. But when they do, it can be devastating. Our company’s curriculum on a tablet lets the nurses do a safety double-check at the moment it’s most important. We’re receiving orders from medical schools, nursing schools and academic medical centers. We’re distributing the products in eight countries.

We produce free 3-D models of the upper torso to train in life-saving airway surgeries, free models of congenital heart disease so it can be treated, and we sell the DR Doppler ultrasound training device that gives simulations of blood flow starting at $500.”

Learn more about Dr.Vozenilek through the Chicago Sun Times Interview,
SimNext Products and the Jump Trading Simulation Center!

Washington Post Highlights B-Line Medical & President Hartley Thompson

hartley-thompson-b-line-medical

A fantastic behind-the-scenes look at the leadership behind B-Line Medical, one of the world’s most innovative groups behind medical simulation recording technologies, by Thomas Heath of The Washington Post. This insider look reveals the challenges and successes that have defined the company, from startup to now over 70 employees worldwide.

Having met many of the team from B-Line Medical I can attest that they are innovative people dedicated to improving learning outcomes at simulation centers around the world. HealthySimulation.com had the opportunity to interview B-Line Medical Co-Founder Chafic Kazoun about the latest innovations unveiled at IMSH 2016 — and as I am every year — I left impressed! Stay tuned for more but in the mean time check out this great article:

“Thompson grew up in the Bahamas, in Freeport. His easygoing nature belies his ambition. His parents pushed him early on to learn the importance of money and entre­pre­neur­ship. His father has started various businesses. His mother owns an event-planning company. “My dad really pushed me and my brothers to go out and make your own money,” he said. “At 8 years old, we started a window-washing and car-washing business.”

“I fell in love with just providing a service to somebody and a product and actually getting paid for it,” he said. He attended Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., on scholarship, graduating with a degree in management information systems.

Thompson joined B-Line Medical in 2007 as employee No. 12. The company was 18 months old. He found the job on CareerBuilder.com. “We were not making money when I got here,” he said. “Like any start-up, we were having lean days. Some bills didn’t get paid.”

Thompson’s plan was to get experience, then start his own company in a few years. But he loved B-Line. “I just showed a passion for the business and a hunger to take on more responsibility and keep learning,” said Thompson, who has a master’s degree in information management from the University of Maryland. B-Line’s breakthrough came when its technology was purchased by Washington University in St. Louis and by Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

“When we landed those two, things started snowballing,” Thompson said.”

Read the full article on The Washington Post website


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HealthySimulation.com Founder & Entrepreneur Lance Baily Interviewed by Modern Outcomes

healthcare simulation modern outcomes

Last month HealthySimulation.com founder and Simulation Evangelist Lance Baily was interviewed via podcast by Matthew Stoltz of Modern Outcomes. The podcast covered Lance’s background and journey into medical simulation, his career, and the many entrepreneurial simulation projects he helped to create including HealthySimulation.com and SimGHOSTS.org.

What You Will Learn:

How SimGHOSTS tackles core issues facing technical simulation specialists today:

  • Training facilitation
  • Professional development processes
  • Showcasing the value of the technical support staff role

How you can validate simualtion purchases with validated customer input

How Healthy Simulation acts as an equalizer ensuring that simulation resources are available across the globe.

Listen to the full podcast on Modern Outcomes today!

Browser-Based Viewer for OpenSim — An Interview w/ Dr. Doug Maxwell

Wrapping up this week’s coverage of all things simulation on LinkedIn comes and interesting story from Kay McLennan, Ph.D. Professor of Practice of Tulane SCS Metaverse. Anyone interested in virtual education systems has to check out these great links!

virtual-sim-interview

I first learned about the U.S. Army Research Simulation and Training Technology Center (STTC) work on a browser-based viewer for OpenSim in a Hypergrid Business e-magazine article entitled “US Army working on browser-based viewer for OpenSim” (by Maria Korolov, October 23, 2015).  In turn, since an OpenSim browser-based viewer would be a game changer for the educators (like me) using this type of virtual world in our e-courses, I asked Dr. Doug Maxwell — a Science and Technology Manager at STTC — if he would answer a few more questions about his team’s work on a browser-based viewer (with the machinima video clip interview below).  Also, learn more about the Military Open Simulator Enterprise Strategy project or MOSES project/grid @http://militarymetaverse.org/ .

Read the full article on LinkedIn and learn more about the simulation resources available on LinkedIn

Dr. John James, Author of Shocking 2014 Patient Safety Article on Medical Errors, Calls for National Patient Safety Board

patient safety regulations

To mark the anniversary of the Institute of Medicine’s watershed report “To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” West Health is running a series of interviews between their Chief Medical and Science officer Dr. Joe Smith and IOM committee members who helped produce the report (which estimates 440,000 lethal errors each year including hospital acquired infections), as well as other national health experts to examine what progress has been made in reducing medical errors in the US. Do you agree that we need a National Patient Safety Board to better regulate healthcare? Leave a comment and let us know!

This week’s Q&A features John T. James, PhD, former chief toxicologist for a federal agency, who has dedicated his life to patient safety after the loss of his teenage son to medical errors in 2002. He is the author of “A Sea of Broken Hearts: Patient Rights in a Dangerous, Profit-Driven Health Care System” and founder of Patient Safety America, a website that provides information for patients on the quality of healthcare in the U.S.

Excerpt from the West Health Article:

Joe Smith: Your recent publication on medical errors in the Journal of Patient Safety has achieved widespread notice, leading to medical errors being identified as the third leading cause of death in the United States, though your background is different than many involved in patient safety efforts. Could you please describe your background and what drove your interest in this important area?

John James: I recently retired from a federal agency where I was the chief toxicologist for 25 years. I am board certified in toxicology and earned a PhD in pathology in 1981 from the University of Maryland while working at a Baltimore hospital and doing research at the National Cancer Institute. In 2002, my 19-year-old son died while running. Three weeks earlier he had been evaluated by cardiologists for five days, primarily as an in-patient after experiencing a non-fatal collapse while running. After obtaining a complete set of his medical records, I realized that multiple, catastrophic medical errors had been made by his doctors. These included failure to follow a widely published guideline for potassium replacement in patients with heart arrhythmias, failure to make an obvious diagnosis of acquired long-QT syndrome and failure to communicate to him that he should not be running. He was also denied informed consent because he was deceived about the outcome of his cardiac MRI, which had not been properly performed. I did not find this information out until long after he died.

While reading medical literature and looked for root causes, I realized that lethal medical errors are not all that uncommon. In 2000, the late Barbara Starfield, MD, estimated far more lethal medical errors than in the 1999 IOM report. I also discovered that cardiologists board certified before 1990, such as my son’s lead cardiologist, are certified for life with no requirement to demonstrate continuing competency. Furthermore, the Texas Medical Board verifies Continuing Medical Education in only one percent of doctors each year. I also learned that getting doctors, especially cardiologists, to follow evidence-based clinical guidelines is a challenge and that diagnostic errors are common, but often go unrecognized. Doctor-to-doctor and doctor-to-patient communication errors are also common and occurred in my son’s case.

JS: What role do you think government plays in combating medical errors? What agency should have oversight and be charged with reducing medical error deaths?

JJ: Overall government agencies, including Congress, have not been assertive in addressing the problem of medical errors. In some ways, the Affordable Care Act has addressed some patient safety concerns without changing the fundamental culture that permits errors to continue. Government officials can be heavily influenced by money originating from medical industry special interests. Harmed patients or their survivors contribute little to political campaigns or PACs. A new agency controlled by leaders in the patient safety movement is needed. It could be called the National Patient Safety Board, modelled to some extent after the National Transportation Safety Board or Consumer Product Safety Commission. The goal of such an agency would be to discover, track and analyze medical errors, and where appropriate, enforce changes – all in a completely transparent way. The well-known limitations and secret-keeping of state medical boards and hospital accreditation organizations would become history. In addition, the agency would enforce a national bill of rights for patients. Violations of those rights would be as serious as civil rights violations or violations of OSHA standards that put workers in harm’s way.

Other West Health Series Articles on “To Err is Human”:

  • A Look Back, Behind the Scenes of the IOM’s Report on Errors: By William Richardson, PhD, Former Chair, IOM Committee
  • A Mother’s Perspective: Q&A with Sorrel King, Founder, The Josie King Foundation
  • 15 Years Later: Q&A with Molly Coye, MD, MPH, UCLA Health
  • Uniting for Patient Safety: Q&A with Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, National Patient Safety Foundation

Read the full interview and other Patient Safety Articles on WestHealth.org!