International Conference on Communication in Healthcare October 8-11 in Baltimore

communication in healthcare

So much of simulation is about practicing communication that we thought we would share about a whole conference dedicated to the topic! Have you attended an ICCH event before? The AACH is hosting its annual International Conference on Communication in Healthcare & Health Literacy Annual Research Conference this October 8-11, 2017 at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront in Maryland. Registration is now open!

Join them for the 15th International Conference on Communication in Healthcare & Health Literacy Annual Research Conference featuring diverse workshops, symposia, poster sessions, and high-profile keynote speakers to inspire the ongoing work of improving communication in healthcare. ICCH & HARC bring together researchers, educators, and applied healthcare professionals from across North America and Europe to share the latest research and teaching methods related to communication and relationships in healthcare. This interdisciplinary event offers a wealth of information for academicians, physicians, nurses, pharmacists, counselors and other professionals interested in healthcare communication. Supporter Packages Available! Take advantage of the opportunity to reach hundreds of healthcare communication personnel from around the world! Current Conference Features


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Keynotes:

  • “Vulnerability- The Most Important Word in Medicine” – Pål Gulbrandsen, MD, PhD
  • “Factors in Communicating with Diverse Patients” – Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, MD
  • “What is it with female doctors?” – Marianne Schmid Mast, PhD
  • “Sweetening the Journey From Disparities to Social Justice” – Lisa Cooper, MD, MPH

Learn more and Register for ICCH 2017 here!


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Serious Games Conference Features Future of AR and VR in Healthcare – July 18-20 VA

ar in healthcare simulation

Is your program or institution looking specifically at VR and AR for healthcare applications? Check out this Serious Play Conference July 18-20 at the George Mason University!

Use of VR for Game-Based Learning Growing; Healthcare, Govt, Education Apps at Serious Play Thought leaders leading sessions at Serious Play Conference in July will share their experience using Virtual Reality to create education and training games. Speakers at the gathering, hosted by the Virginia Serious Game Institute (VSGI) at George Mason University’s Science and Technology Campus outside DC include many speakers and topics such as these presentations focusing on healthcare:

  • Mobile VR & AR Games for Healthcare by David Metcalf Institute for Simulation and Training, UCF
  • Clinical Tools VR for Complicated 3D Healthcare Structures Bradley Turner
  • How VR and AR Will Revolutionize Healthcare by Walter Greenleaf Stanford School of Medicine

Serious Play is a gathering where creators and learning professionals can have critical conversations about game design requirements and share their knowledge with peers. The focus of the conference is exploring opportunities, challenges and the potential of game-based learning. Their goal is to provide a forum for visionary educators, chief learning officers and heads of training programs in health care, government/military or other fields that want to learn how to improve the effectiveness of their program, and use the data collected to do even better.

Healthcare Track Sessions Include:

  1. Thomas Talbot USC Institute for Creative Technologies: Time to Leave the Lab, What Will it Take to Make Useful Games Viable for People and Businesses?
  2. David Metcalf Institute for Simulation and Training, UCF: Mobile Games Developed for Military Healthcare Training
  3. Scott Simpkins Applied Physics Laboratory Johns Hopkins: Using Games to Improve Clinical Practice and Healthcare Administration
  4. Alexander Libin Georgetown University: Predictive Analytics for an Embedded Assessment Framework: Developing Data-based Multimedia Technologies
  5. Students From Univ of Washington iSchool with Ran Hinrichs: Serious Play in Government Leadership Training
  6. Kevin Holloway Center for Deployment Psychology Uniformed Services Univ Of the Health Sciences: Virtual Professional Training in Evidence Based Psychotherapies, Gaming for Behavioral Health Providers
  7. Ran Hinrichs 2b3d Studios: Using Games to Study the Psychological Impact of Military Deployment
  8. Walter Greenleaf Virtual Human Interaction Lab Stanford University School of Medicine: How Virtual and Augmented Reality Technology will Revolutionize Healthcare
  9. Brad Tanner: Clinical Tools 3D Virtual Reality Using Oculus to Teach Complicated 3D Structures in Healthcare
  10. Doris Rusch DePaul University: Integrating Academia, Healthcare Professionals and Patients to Create a Learning Game for Chronically Ill Patient Diseases
  11. Dmitriy Babichenko Lorin Grieve, Jonathan Velez University of Pittsburgh: To Scope or Not To Scope: Challenges of Gamifying Clinical Procedures Training
  12. Kimberly Hieftje Yale Center for Health & Learning Games: Re-purposing Serious Games: Making the Development Time Count Twice (or More)
  13. Kenneth Bibbins PrepWorld Philliph Mutisya NC Central University: Trauma Informed Game Based Learning for Kids
  14. Beth Rogozinski Pear Therapeutics: The Challenges of Creating Mobile Games for Regulated Health Situations
  15. Lisa Marriott OHSU/PSU School of Public Health: Working with Local Schools on Nutrition Education
  16. David Wortley GAETSS, UK: Trends in Serious Games for Health and Well-Being

Learn more and Register on the Serious Games Website today!

 

University of Nebraska Medical Center Breaks Ground on $119M Davis Global Simulation and Training Center

davis simulation center

What wonderful news for the University of Nebraska healthcare program! On Monday, the University of Nebraska Medical Center held a ceremonial groundbreaking for a planned health care simulation center that will change education of students in the health professions, as well as practicing health professionals in Nebraska. The $118.9 million center, called the Dr. Edwin Davis & Dorothy Balbach Davis Global Center for Advanced Interprofessional Learning — Davis Global Center for short – will transform health care education at UNMC. The center is scheduled to open in September 2018.

As aviation simulation changed the flight industry – health care simulation will propel the training of doctors, nurses and allied health professionals into the next generation with emerging virtual and augmented reality. UNMC’s goal? To provide the highest quality of patient care and safety to improve human performance and effectiveness in health care.

The multi-level Davis Global Center at 42nd and Emile Streets in Omaha will:

  • Result in new and relevant learning methods, including the creation of 3-D/Virtual and Augmented Reality content, clinical and surgical training modules, research and development opportunities, and interprofessional learning.
  • Feature such state-of-the art technology as the iEXCEL Helix – a unique extended 280-degree curved screen creating a 2-D/3-D immersive environment; the first-of-its-kind laser-based 3-D iSpace – a five-sided virtual immersive reality environment; and a 130-seat holographic theater.
  • Form the hub of a statewide network of interconnected simulation centers for the professional development of health care providers across the state.
  • Collaborate with industry to provide new research and development opportunities.
  • Contribute to workforce development and economic growth for Nebraska, creating up to 325 well-paying jobs.
  • Generate an annual economic impact in Nebraska of approximately $40 million (Tripp Umbach study).
  • Offer specialized training opportunities in simulation technology and 3-D/Virtual and Augmented Reality content development.

The nearly 192,000-gross-square-foot center has been developed to help transform health care education from the traditional lecture-based model to embrace more “hands-on” engagement that addresses skills competencies, including teamwork. Studies show that experiential learning yields greater retention than lectures, as well as improves proficiencies. As a result, the traditional “See one, Do one, Teach one,” model will be supplemented with human patient simulators; surgical simulation; and interactive visualization technology such as head-mounted displays; 2-D interactive, touch-screen learning walls; and 3-D and Virtual Immersive Reality (VIR) environments. “Incorporating experiential learning into the curriculum is important,” said UNMC student Cindy Chou, who will graduate in May with her M.D., Ph.D. “Studies have shown that with traditional lectures, there is about a 5 percent retention rate of knowledge, whereas if you have hands-on practice or immediate application, it increases the rate up to 90 percent. So, in that sense, we really need to be doing more active learning and more practicing.”

Learn more about this wonderful new center on the UNMC website!

 


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7 Pasos para Lograr un Crecimiento Récord en su Programa de Simulación Medica: Parte 1

growing a simulation program

This is a Spanish translation of our article 7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 1 transcribed by Alfred de Jesús Toledo de Lima Director del Centro de Simulación COSMOS en Universidad Nacional Pedro Henríquez Ureña! Thanks Alfred!

Este mes hemos estado cubriendo consideraciones clave de negocios que su personal de simulación necesita tener en cuenta para construir o expandir el programa. Los artículos anteriores en esta serie incluyen el “Lenguaje de las ventas – cómo aumentar su presupuesto para simulación” y “3 recursos dominantes para ampliar su programa de simulación”.

En el artículo de hoy comparto cómo, siendo Director del Centro de Simulación Clínica de Las Vegas, pude obtener $ 250,000 USD en contratos de negocios externos en sólo dos años. Estos fondos adicionales ayudaron al centro a contratar personal adicional y a comprar nuevos equipos. Por lo tanto, tenga en cuenta que aunque este artículo se centra en los contratos externos, centrarse en los materiales presentados aquí también le ayudará a ampliar sus servicios de simulación hasta en los departamentos internos dentro de su institución.

La discusión se centra en 7 áreas clave necesarias para crear un embudo de ventas exitoso para sus servicios de simulación, los primeros 3 de los cuales cubriremos hoy:

  1. Obtención de apoyo
  2. Construir un programa
  3. Aprovechar oportunidades
  4. Mercadearse usted mismo
  5. Proporcionar servicios de calidad
  6. Obtención de retroalimentación
  7. Perfeccionamiento de los sistemas
  1. Obtencion de apoyo

Antes de que yo empezara a construir un programa de simulación externo, sabía que tendría que obtener el apoyo del liderazgo ejecutivo de nuestro departamento para dedicar tiempo y energía concentrándome en clientes fuera de nuestros grupos de interés internos. En el CSCLV este liderazgo eran los Decanos de las escuelas colaborativas compartiendo el espacio (todos los cuales estaban bajo el techo del Sistema de Educación Superior de Nevada UNLV, NSC y UNSOM).

Después de nuestro primer año de utilización, pude demostrar a los decanos que los espacios de nuestro centro no estaban siendo utilizados durante muchas noches y fines de semana. Esto fue seguido por el recordatorio de la oportunidad de “alquilar” esos espacios a grupos que podrían estar interesados en capacitar a sus estudiantes de atencion medica o estar en un centro que se vea como de atención médica pero sin pacientes reales. Los decanos acordaron que una exploración del desarrollo de negocios externos podría ayudar a cubrir los costos no sólo del tiempo de trabajo necesario para manejar esos compromisos, sino tambien el tiempo de trabajo adicional para ayudar a nuestros propios programas y también para pagar por nuevos equipos en el futuro cuando fuera necesario.

Los decanos me recordaron que tendría que obtener permiso para una cuenta especial del sistema estatal para obtener ingresos, y que tendría que generar una plantilla de contrato para los usuarios externos para proteger el centro – una que exigiera a los programas externos una prueba de estar asegurados para cubrir cualquier accidente. Después de esto me reuní con el soporte legal del Centro de la UNLV para tratar todas estas preocupaciones con el fin de obtener la aprobación final en el inicio de un programa externo.

  1. Construir un programa

Lo más importante a recordar al iniciar el desarrollo de un nuevo programa de simulación, interno o externo, es comenzar en pequeño. Al crear un programa exitoso que sea manejable y repetible, su equipo puede “enjuagar y repetir” en modo automatico mientras reserva energías de desarrollo para proyectos más grandes. Recuerde que el personal se fatiga con información nueva, nuevos procesos, nuevas tecnologías y nuevos sistemas. Al apuntar demasiado alto al principio, nos arriesgamos a agotarnos nosotros mismos y nuestros programas. Con un programa más pequeño, podemos estar seguros de no extender nuestros recursos demasiado rápido y agotarlos. Recuerde, el objetivo es el éxito a largo plazo del programa – y pasos más pequeños nos ayudarán a construir sobre nuestros logros y, en última instancia, avanzar más lejos, más rápido.

Esta mentalidad ayudó a nuestro equipo a escoger nuestro primer cliente externo, el curso de ATLS del Hospital del Condado que quedaba junto a nosotros. El grupo estaba buscando un nuevo anfitrión que les proporcionara el espacio para el entrenamiento, y para almacenar los materiales necesarios para los cursos. Sus educadores proporcionarian el entrenamiento, y el mercadeo local. Nuestro personal almacenaría su equipo, les proporcionaría espacio, proporcionaría mercadeo adicional y aseguraría una pequeña tarifa por nuestro trabajo.

Este reducido programa de 2 días permitió a nuestro equipo trabajar con cientos de situaciones que surgieron sin sobrecargar nuestro horario de trabajo de “8 a 5” dedicado a los usuarios internos de nuestro programa de simulación. Puntos como catering, recolección de pagos, horarios, contratos y preocupaciones de seguridad fueron abordados durante los 2 meses previos al primer evento. ¡Cómo resolveriamos con el aparcamiento y direcciones al salon mismo tambien necesitaba ser considerado! Las ganancias de este programa fueron pequeñas, apenas unos $ 1500 USD por evento de fin de semana.

Evidentemente aprendimos muchas cosas del primer programa en el Centro que luego incorporamos en eventos futuros (más sobre esto luego). Lo importante a destacar aquí es que después de este curso ahora podríamos manejar programas más grandes, más largos y más caros para clientes externos. Después de esto, lanzamos cursos de capacitación basados en simulación en colaboración con un consultor externo que duraron entre 4-5 días y requirieron mucho más apoyo por parte de nuestro personal en cuanto a experiencias de simulación, marketing y administración. Los beneficios de estos eventos aumentaron a unos $ 6.000 USD por evento.

Después de completar con éxito varios de estos entrenamientos, estábamos listos para programas de varias semanas con hospitales locales y escuelas privadas que terminaron generando $ 50,000 USD + contratos. Si hubiéramos empezado desde la nada a este alto nivel de servicio, estoy seguro de que no habríamos podido proporcionar programas de alta calidad los cuales son necesarios para asegurar relaciones de apoyo a largo plazo y testimonios positivos, mientras minimizamos los niveles de estrés del personal.

  1. Aprovechar oportunidades

Considere ¿Que hace que su programa de simulación sea especial? ¿Qué servicios puede proporcionar su equipo, centro, programa que los interesados internos o clientes externos pueden necesitar? Piense en pequeño y piense en grande: ¿qué grupos locales podrían beneficiarse de los contratos de capacitación permanente a largo plazo y qué grupos internacionales visitarían su centro para programas de capacitación especializada? ¿A qué equipo poco común tiene acceso su programa actualmente? ¿Está usted ubicado en un destino de viaje?

El CSCLV está ubicado en Las Vegas, lo que significa que puede atraer a personas de todo el mundo que estén interesadas en obtener Certificados de Educacion Continua mientras viajan a una ubicación divertida. ¿Qué oportunidades únicas ofrece su equipo, facultad, programa y ciudad a los clientes potenciales?

Otro beneficio de Las Vegas es su proximidad a Hollywood, que ayudó a Nuestro Centro De Simulación A Tener Su Día Más Rentable De La Historia. Las compañías de producción pagarán mucho dinero para alquilar instalaciones que parezcan localidades clínicas pero que no tengan pacientes reales de los que preocuparse.

Saber lo que puede ofrecer a los clientes locales, regionales, nacionales e internacionales le permitirá identificar y construir programas que hablarán y atraerán nuevos negocios a su programa.

¿Está interesado en una inmersión más profunda en estos temas?

¡Eche un vistazo a las 8 sesiones grabadas del evento HealthySimAdmin de forma gratuita después de inscribirse en el boletín mensual de HealthySim!

* Actualización: La segunda parte de esta serie de artículos ya está disponible, la cual nos proporciona 4 ideas más necesarias para hacer crecer su programa de simulación: ¡Marketing, entrega, retroalimentación y crecimiento!

Sports Training Demonstrates Future Use of VR in Healthcare Simulation

training in VR

The potential of VR is unlimited when it comes to hand-eye coordination. Identification and initial action will be huge opportunities with the immersive technology. Imagine being able to train residents from 5 different countries in an OR procedure at the same time, or train doctors in a new skill based off emerging technology that no one has ever used before, or having a new nursing student do patient safety assessment without the need for a million dollar sim lab room? All of these things and more will be possible through the advancement of VR training platforms.

Over on UploadVR.com they recently interviewed the Clemson Football coach, on how they are already using VR to help players identify a blitz:

“I didn’t know what to expect early on from (the VR), but it’s been great for us,” Clemson coach Dabo Swinney says. “We’ve learned how to maximize the efficiency of it. Deshaun might go through yesterday’s blitz script. (Linebacker) Ben Boulware can go in and practice without having to practice. Sometimes a guy who is hurt can still get mental reps. There’s just so many uses for it. It’s been a great teaching tool.”

While the NFL may be welcoming a QB partially molded by VR, it’s not known if he’ll continue to utilize it with his next team. Clemson, however, is already grooming Watson’s successor by having him split time meeting with his QB coach and going through concepts in VR. Though the value of physical talent won’t be diminishing, it’s going to be interesting to see how a generation of players sharpened by VR do over time.

The NFL is reportable using VR to help refs make the best calls:

In statements made while interviewing with BizTech, the NFL’s SVP, Chief Information Officer Michelle McKenna-Doyle stated the the league was “in the early phases of developing VR training materials for referees”. The NFL has already fostered a relationship with VR companies via concussion recognition, various film and video series, and post-game coverage, so it makes perfect sense to bring it to officiating as well.

Emulating the angles and slow motion clips that referees get access to during replay review in live games shouldn’t be an issue for virtual reality, but hopefully the VR simulations will be detailed enough that refs can watch plays unfold in natural game speed with enough definition to notice things a bit better. It’s tough to imagine this tech being efficient while officials are still part-time, but hopefully this technology will find a home within the league.

Sports franchises are always investigating the use of latest technologies to gain a leg up on the competition, and are thus much faster at adopting new technologies — so certainly healthcare simulation champions should look into the sports industry from time to time to see what is sticking — because it will soon be on our doorstep!

Read these stories on UploadVr!


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How Realistic Can Environments Get in VR?

photorealism medical simulation vr

Last week HealthySimulation was on hand at the VR Fest at CES to learn more about the latest in AR/VR technologies– over the next few weeks we will be recapping some of the highlights from those events as well as related content that we believe will have an impact into medical simulation in the future. “Forget 360 Videos, Photogrammetric Virtual Reality Is Where It’s At” suggests Leif Johnson from VICE.

Today we start with a video highlighting the opportunity for photorealistic environments in VR scenes from Realities.io. You won’t believe the level of detail that is possible in complete 3D as you move about these interior spaces. The implications for healthcare simulated environments should be obvious!

FAQ from the Website:

  • What does realities do? Realities lets you explore a growing library of interesting and mesmerizing places from all around the globe in virtual reality that are explorable in photorealistic quality. Travel to places that were out of reach before, e.g. famous tourist sites, archeological and cultural heritages sites and lost places.
  • How do you create the VR environments? Most of our scans are based on photogrammetry. We also use other scanning techniques like LiDAR when necessary.
  • What do I need to experience Realities? Currently we only support HTC Vive, Oculus Rift support will be added soon. Further you need a computer fulfilling the recommended specs for VR (Intel i5 / 4GB RAM / GeForce GTX 970 or equivalent)

Learn more about these environments and download some examples for the HTC and Oculus on the Realities.io Website!

Upcoming Military Healthcare Summit Looks to Connect Simulation Industry to DoD

military healthcare simulation conference

The Military Healthcare Conference Feb. 27th –  March 1st 2017 in Washington D.C. promises to provide a forum to examine the complex construct of the Military Healthcare System and determine the best courses of action to address current operational and readiness challenges while maintaining the excellent standard of care U.S. Service members and their families deserve. Some of these discussions will focus on whether the community should rely on Military MTF’s to provide beneficiary care while maintaining military deployable readiness, or outsource more of the Military Healthcare construct. They will also examine critical focus areas such as new tools and techniques for clinical and combat education and training, combat medicine facility readiness, and new advances in medical research and development – truly addressing the full spectrum of Military Healthcare Operations. Don’t miss the opportunity to understand and support the current and future requirements of our medical stakeholders as they commit to the continuous improvement of healthcare delivery to our troops and their families!

With the DoD Unified Medical Budget expected to be $48.8 billion this year, military execs are now looking to invest Military Health Systems and advance in areas such as:

  • Medical Education/Training
  • Medical/Patient Simulation
  • EHR
  • Medical Technology
  • Clinical Care Innovation
  • Combat & Amputee Care

The Military Healthcare Summit, this February 27th-March 1st is the industry platform designed to elevate your organization and provide you with the opportunity to connect with key U.S. military healthcare executives including our lead speaking faculty:

  • Stacy Cummings, Program Executive Officer, PEO Defense Health Management Systems
  • Matt Hepburn, Program Manager, Biological Technologies Office, DARPA
  • Christopher Ivany, Chief, Army Behavioral Health, U.S. Army
  • James Dienst, Director, Education and Training Directorate, Defense Health Agency
  • …and much more!

Sponsorship and Exhibition Opportunities Still Available via contact Stephen Aponte on the website!

Learn more at the Military Healthcare IQPC website today!


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3D Digital Continuity is the Future of Healthcare Education

3-D Digital Continuity Is the Future of Human Health

Sim champions it won’t be long before the entire healthcare industry is surronded by 3D Animation! We already know that designing and testing devices using 3D physical simulation is a key part of developing a commercial product. Slowly we are convincing the world that simulating and testing healthcare providers will become a key part of developing a more effictive healthcare system. Imagine watching in real-time, the human patient’s case as it developed — in 3D on the wall during diagnosis. With faster computers like IBM’s Watson — its only a matter of time! Check out the use of animation from a recent Medical Device Summit:

Steve Levine reports on The Living Heart Project which enables realistic simulation. At a time when the industry is facing some of its toughest challenges, more than 200 regulators, engineers, and healthcare leaders came together in Chicago at the American Medical Device (AMD) Summit in October, to discuss the state of the medical device industry and focus on opportunities to accelerate innovation, with increased predictability and profitability. From a regulatory, patient and payer perspective, medical device business models are changing, creating an environment that has rendered sustainable innovation elusive for many medical device companies seeking to grow their top line as well as bottom line.

These shifts in the marketplace are pressuring the balancing act between corporate efficiency, time to market, and predictable patient outcomes. It has raised an essential question for the future of the medical device industry—how to restructure to remain competitive and compliant while simultaneously meeting the needs of the patient, provider, and enterprise? The healthcare industry is finding answers in an unlikely place, by turning to a resource traditionally associated with more traditional manufacturing industries such as automotive and aerospace.

Aeromedical Evacuation Crews Score Their First Flight Simulators

Aeromedical Evacuation Crews Score Their First Flight Simulators

Combining aviation and healthcare simulation into one experience? That’s the power of working with CAE Healthcare! In today’s story we share how the Air Force is combing simulation experiences for both aviation and healthcare crews:

In the back of a C-130 Hercules, a woman is giving birth. Like many other women, she is confused and nervous during the process, lashing out when a nurse touches her arm and anxiously calling out for her baby after delivering.

As lifelike as the scenario is, almost everything about the situation is fake, from the aircraft itself — actually a training system meant to replicate the fuselage of the C-130 — to the woman, a mannequin capable of blinking, speech and delivering a small mannequin baby. To the military nurses and medical technicians taking care of the clockwork woman and her newborn, this is as close to real as they can possibly get until they’re face-to-face with a human patient.

Air Force pilots typically practice their skills via ground-based fuselage trainers, as do many specialized crew positions like the C-17 loadmasters responsible for air dropping supplies. But until just recently, aeromedical personnel were forced to rely on either flight-based training or less immersive ground-based simulations where they would act out scenarios in a normal classroom, said Lt. Col. Chad Corliss, deputy commander of the 94th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron.

Aviation’s Black Boxes Are Coming to Healthcare Training

black boxes in healthcare

This summer I was thrilled to provide the SESAM closing plenary address where I shared the past, present and future of healthcare simulation — and made direct calls for healthcare to integrate a “blackbox” into healthcare. The argument is simple: recording devices have been successfully improving aviation training and performance outcomes since the 1970s — and in a day and age where police body cameras are becoming affordable for every single officer, clearly healthcare is on a similar path. Today here is more support for such a conversation from Richard Corder, Partner at Wellesley Partners which provides Executive Coaching in Boston and throughout the Northeast:

There are many industries, other than healthcare, that work in complex environments where the actions of one human can impact the life of another. Healthcare leaders need to acknowledge the reality that we have much to learn from other industries. While we cannot mimic others entirely, the same general operating principles (including mindfulness that serves as the overarching organizational spirit) that are the foundation for other high reliability organizations (i.e.: aviation, nuclear power) can work just as well to prevent harm from occurring in health systems.

One example of a safe practice or technology that could shared across industries is the in-flight data recorder found on all commercial airliners. It was because of the in-flight data recorder on board the two Boeing 747s that crashed into one another on the island of Tenerife in 1977 that we learned so much about the decisions and behaviors resulting in that game-changing airline disaster.  The time stamped voice commands of those at the controls were captured in real-time, and provided a blueprint of what “not to do” along with a snapshot of what needed to be changed.

Now envision this: following a surgical procedure, regardless of the outcome, we have the opportunity to review every piece of data related to the procedure.

Read the full article on Healthcare Executives Network