IMSH 2017 Must Sees and Big Announcements

imsh 2017

Hello Sim champs! Excited to see many of you this weekend at #IMSH2017 in Orlando — where lots of great networking, product launches, and educational courses will be taking place! If you are attending, please be sure to stop by and say hi to HealthySimulation.com’s founder Lance Baily at the SimGHOSTS booth #825. Email me if you would like to setup a time to connect!

Here are some sneak peak announcements of must see items for IMSH we have already heard about from the community:

imsh 2017

Stories From the Heart Opening Keynote: Many of us have taken part in a healthcare simulation exercise and know the feeling of confidence it can bring. We understand that the knowledge gained can lead directly to improved patient safety, a change in our life, or even save a patient’s life. This is an incredible concept and many of us have a tale to tell. Come join us during our Opening Plenary Session to hear the powerful stories of how simulation has helped save a life! Discover how simulation can impact a medical professional’s career. Explore the ways that simulation has saved a patient’s life. Become reenergized in your practice by hearing how simulation positively impacts the work we do everyday!

simghosts sim training

SimGHOSTS launches online course development profit share opportunity & Raffles Off Oculus Rift! Interested in creating an online course to help others learn key aspects of healthcare simulation technology and operations? More interested in earning a share of the revenue earned from developing such a course as it sells to their international audience of simulation champions? Stop by their booth #825 to learn more about the types of course content they are seeking and how you can win an Oculus Rift DK2! They are also having their annual “Pub Crawl” Sunday night starting with the “Pub” right near the convention center at 9PM!

cardionics new products

Cardionics launches new products! Imagine a shirt you or your low-fidelity manikin could wear, that would enable your learners to auscultate actual pathological breathing and body sounds! Attend their launch presentation with Dr. Bill Boudreaux from the University of Texas Medical Branch, School of Medicine. Date: Monday, Jan 30th Time: 3 pm – 3:30 pm Location: Rainbow Springs Room 1 & 2 (conveniently located across the lobby from the exhibit hall) to learn more about the SimShirt, SAM Gen III, and more!



operative-experience-surgical-simulation

Operative Experience Launches First Major BoothLou Oberndorf, the man behind METI, is now helping Operative Experience grow their realistic surgical trainer product lines with some big new product announcements coming this week. We had a chance to see this technology a few years back during the military demonstration at IMSH, but with Lou connected to the project be sure to keep your eye out for Operative Experience.

preemie simulator

SIMCharacters’ North American Debut of Paul — World’s First High Emotion Preterm Simulator at simAlliance Booth – Very excited about this one readers! Come to the collaborative simAlliance booth #325 featuring Paul, the most advanced preterm infant simulation our industry has seen. Paul enables highly realistic critical care training in neonatology for improved learning and patient safety outcomes. He is a preterm simulator for neonates born at 27 weeks with realistic internal and external anatomy including 3D printed larynx which demonstrates authentic pathologies specific to preterm babies with physiological and pathological breathing patterns including RDS, BPD, cyanosis, and hyperoxia. Come see Paul and also learn more about SIMStation’s AV recording and debriefing systems, SimCore’s simulation center management tool, and the AV systems design and installation services of Level 3 Healthcare!

sim-learningspace-h1

CAE Healthcare Showcasing New LearningSpace Features to Current Customers! Monday Jan. 30th at 7:15-8:15AM in Discovery 45, CAE Healthcare team members will showcase sneak peaks to the latest features to their awesome LearningSpace system. If you are a new customer you can learn more about LearningSpace here or by visiting their booth #600 — the biggest booth this year! I also hear they will be showcasing some new VR technologies which I can’t wait to learn more about!

Got a hot tip on something else launching at IMSH 2017? Email us and let us know and we’ll add it here!

As always, stay tuned to @HealthySim for great tweets covering the show!


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CAE Healthcare Supports Development of Simulation Impact Tool with Leeds Beckett

Nurse academic works on tool to measure student learning

Nursing Times recently covered how CAE Healthacre is supporting the development of a tool that calculates the impact of a student’s simulated encounter with a patient with UK based Leeds Beckett University!

Ann Sunderland, director of clinical skills and simulation at Leeds Beckett University, has been selected to work with Canadian Aviation Electronics (CAE) Healthcare to develop a tool that calculates the impact of a student’s simulated encounter with a patient.

The project, Patient Impact Scoring, will build on Ms Sunderland’s PhD research, which centers around the impact of simulation-based education on patient outcomes. CAE Healthcare’s existing system in the university’s clinical skills suite is equipped with 13 cameras, including four mobile cameras, that allows educators to assess activity. Ms Sunderland will compare the effects on patient outcomes in relation to both simulation-based and scheduled learning activities in postgraduate students.

She will then work with CAE Healthcare programming experts in the US to develop a tool for calculating a score that reflects the overall impact of the student’s encounter with a patient – either a lifelike mannequin or simulated patient – during a simulated scenario.

Ms Sunderland, a nurse by background, said: “Simulation has become firmly embedded in healthcare education over the last few decades as there is overwhelming evidence to support its effectiveness. “Simulation-based education offers targeted learning experiences where knowledge, skills and attitudes can be learned and refined within a safe and supportive environment,” she noted. “The ability to replicate specific clinical scenarios with immersive and interactive participation from learners – both individuals and teams – is a powerful tool with which to enhance technical and non-technical skills, as well as being a useful method of assessment,” she said.

Top 51 Medical Simulation Posts of 2016!

top 51 healthcare simulation

The most read medical simulation articles of 2016. Happy New Years Medical Simulation Champions! Today, as we have every year since launching HealthySimulation.com in 2010 we are sharing the most read healthcare simulation posts of the past year. Did you know that since 2010 HealthySim has provided almost 1,000,000 article displays to more than 350,000 website visitors? Thank you for your continued support of this FREE medical simulation resource website!

Related to the General Use Simulation Across:

51. OSF HealthCare Partners with NIH and AHA to Create Online Medical Journal for 3D Hearts

50. Virtual and Augmented Reality Market To Reach $162 billion by 2020

49. Aviation’s Black Boxes Are Coming to Healthcare Training

48. Iqarus Provides Fully Immersive Live Action Combat Medicine Training Center in UK

47. Do Checklists Change Human Behaviors? Thoughts from Medical Lawyer Dr. Argy

46. You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

45. Vet Students Train with Simulators in New Lab at Cornell University

44. Toyota Utilizes VR to Showcase the Future of Driving Simulation

43. NASA Mars Mission Crew Emerges From Yearlong Simulation In Hawaii

News Stories Related to the Industry of Healthcare Simulation:

42. Tonight! Jeopardy Game Show to Feature Healthcare Simulation

41. Delta College Performs 6 Hour Trauma Simulation Scenario with Local Authories

40. UK TV Shows How CAE Healthcare Manikins ‘METIman’ are Made!

39. TEDx Talk: Simulation Necessary To Prepare for Birthing Emergencies

38. Homeland Security Simulation Center Offers Realistic Training for Disaster Preparedness

37. University of South Alabama Healthcare Simulation Program Covered by Local News

36. U.S. Army Awards Portion of $135M Medical Simulation Contract to ECS

35. Plymouth University Pennisula Offers Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and Masters in Simulation & Pt Safety

34. The Newest Medical Simulation Center Designs May Surprise You!

33. Lance Baily To Support the Launch of New Preterm Simulator from SimCharacters

Society and Organizational Updates:

32. INSPIRE Provides Support to Healthcare Simulation Pediatric Researchers

31. 3rd Annual Asia Pacific Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare Launches in Singapore

30. 2-Hour Laerdal SimMan 3G Programming Course Now Available Through SimGHOSTS

29. California Simulation Alliance Workshops and Conference in October

28. Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare Updates

27. SimGHOSTS USA 2016 Opens at Jump Trading Simulation Center Sponsored by SimulationIQ

Vendor and Simulator Related Articles:

26. Cardionics Provides SimScope Auscultation Simulator for Real-Time Standardized Patient Learning

25. Laerdal’s SimMom Receives Non-Gravid Abdominal Skin Product Update

24. SimMon iTunes Patient Monitor Vital Sign Simulator App

23. Simulation Champion Provides Laerdal SimMan Ankle Fix

22. Southern California Simulation Collaborative Hosts TeleHealth Robotics and Laerdal Mini-SUN

21. Debrief2Learn Aims to Improve Healthcare Outcomes with Effective Debriefing Practices

20. CAE Healthcare Shares Patient Safety Foundation Info Graphic

19. Polhemus Brings Micro Sensor Motion Tracking to Healthcare Simulation

18. Beyond Debriefing – Studiocode from Vosaic Enables for High Level Research Studies for Healthcare Simulation

17. WISER Provides Simulation Courses For All Staff Positions

General Advice for Healthcare Simulation Programs:

16. Online Leadership in Simulation Instruction and Management Graduate Certificate Program from RMU

15. Teaching Patient Handoffs to Medical Students in OB/GYN: Simulation Curriculum and Assessment Tool

14. Why You & Your Simulation Program Should Avoid Flying United Airlines

Healthcare Simulation Program Administration:

13. 7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program

12. The Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget

11. 3 Key Resources to Expand Your Simulation Program

Top 10 Medical Simulation Posts of 2016:

10. SimCharacters Celebrates #WorldPrematurityDay With Launch of Paul, The World’s First High Emotion Simulator

9. Where to get Free Medical Simulation Scenarios

8. Top 9 Most Read Healthcare Simulation Articles from Summer 2016

7. Complete Administrator’s Guide To Healthcare Simulation ‘HealthySimAdmin’ Program Series Now Available for Free!

6. Supporting Transitions in Medical Career Pathways: the Role of Simulation-Based Education

5. Updates from SimGHOSTS, The Leaders in Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Support

5. Media Covers May BMJ Article: “Medical Error 3rd Leading Cause of Death in U.S.” – Call for New Hashtag #SimToZero!

4. The Must-Own Healthcare Simulation Library *Updated for 2016

3. Medical Simulation Jobs Page

2. Top 11 Healthcare Simulation Articles of 2015 from the Top 51 Medical Simulation Articles of 2015.

1. Is This The Most Beautiful Healthcare Simulation Center in the World? You’ll never guess where one of the most beautiful healthcare simulation centers in the world is located!

Be sure to subscribe to HealthySim’s FREE email newsletter to stay up with all the best medical simulation articles!


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Cincinnati’s St. Elizabeth ‘Saves Christmas’ with New Simulation Center

St. Elizabeth 'saves Christmas' with new Simulation Center

Cincinnati’s Soap Box Media recently covered the launch of a new simulation center “SIM” at the St. Elizabeth Training Education Center:

Imagine you’re a nurse in a hospital delivery room, and immediately after giving birth the mother starts hemorrhaging. It’s a situation you rarely face, maybe once in your career, but if you don’t do exactly the right thing very quickly, the mother’s life will be in peril.

How does the hospital ensure that you know what to do when there’s no time to think? How do they train you, the physician, the anesthesiologist and the facility’s blood bank staff to pull together as a team and make the correct decisions? St. Elizabeth Healthcare is counting on its new Simulation Center to make the difference.

The SIM Center officially opened in late October as a 23,000-square-foot addition to the St. Elizabeth Training and Education Center, which itself opened in June. SETEC was fashioned from a former conference center in Erlanger to centralize all of St. Elizabeth’s staff training and development functions. The SIM Center utilizes lifelike mannequins in realistic hospital rooms with state-of-the-art equipment to create real-world scenarios for staff. And these aren’t the passive mannequins you might have seen used in CPR demonstrations.

SIM Center Manager Megan Vasseur says the mannequins have heartbeats, breathing sounds and pulses everywhere we have pulses, and some even blink, sweat and cry. One female mannequin delivers a baby, complete with a reservoir of blood and bodily fluids that do their thing at the appropriate time.

“These mannequins are very realistic, which is kind of a strange experience at first if you’re not used to it,” Vasseur said. “But they provide a much higher level of experience for our staff and help them develop better skills than the old way of working on each other or on live volunteers. We focus a lot of our simulation work on low-volume, high-risk situations that don’t happen all that often, but when they do, you have to be proficient at fixing them. With these mannequins, if you make a mistake it’s not life and death — you learn from your mistakes, practice your skills and get better.”

Interested in getting such media attention to your simulation program? Read our Press Tutorial Guide here!

Mount Sinai Unveils Medical Modeling Core: Will Provide Virtual Reality, Simulation, and 3D Printing Services

Mount Sinai Unveils Medical Modeling Core: Will Provide Virtual Reality, Simulation, and 3D Printing Services

Both 3ders.org and 3Dprint.org covered the recent launch of the Medical Modeling Core which will “provide virtual reality, simulation, and 3D printing services, with quick turnaround times, on a low-cost, fee-for-service basis.”

The wonders of 3D printing in the medical field are far-reaching. You can create better spinal care , make a wide variety of prosthetics , or even 3D print amazing, origami-inspired self-folding medical implants . New York’s Mount Sinai Health System is certainly no stranger to 3D printing : the hospital’s chief of pathology and laboratory medicine recently worked with 3D printed bone material . Yesterday, they announced the creation of their new Medical Modeling Core, where clinicians can confer and order 3D prints for their cases. Led by the Department of Neurosurgery , this collaboration will provide virtual reality, simulation, and 3D printing services, with quick turnaround times, on a low-cost, fee-for-service basis.

This resource is the first of its kind, catering to the patient-specific 3D modeling requirements for the Mount Sinai clinicians. The simulation, prototyping, and 3D printing resources developed at Mount Sinai are pretty rare for a medical institution. The 3D printed models will be used in the planning stages for minimally invasive approaches, and can also be used in a surgery trial run. They will also be invaluable during the patient consultation process. 

“We’re unique because we can leverage our technological tools with the expertise of radiology and the printing lab to complete projects on a rapid time scale,” said Dr. Costa. “We’re talking about days as opposed to weeks. Mount Sinai is a large institution with a high volume of cases and our patients will benefit from 3D modeling.”

Read the full 3Ders Article here and the 3DPrint Article here!

HealthySimulation Now Hosts Largest Medical Simulation LinkedIn Group in the World

medical simulation linkedin group

Recently HealthySim’s Medical Simulation LinkedIn Group crossed 3,000 subscribers — becoming the largest in the world! Our daily articles are posted there along with many others from simulation champions such as yourself who also comment an start discussions. Those interested in daily medical simulation updates on top of our free monthly email newsletter, can subscribe to the channel and its free daily group update. Looks like the online social networking platform just got a new design so its the perfect time to check it out.

Not on LinkedIn yet? You should be! Consider why this “Professional Facebook” is an important online resume and networking tool for modern careers with our article on the topic here. Microsoft thought so much of LinkedIn — they bought it this year!

Are you looking to advertise simulation products, services, or jobs? Email us to learn how you can connect the global medical simulation community today on our website, newsletter, twitter feed and our newsletter.

Join Your Global Sim Champ Peers by Subscribing Today to HealthySim LinkedIn Group!

Also, be sure to follow @HealthySim on twitter!

Is This The Reason Healthcare Simulation Isn’t Main Stream?

clinical simulation in nursing

Key Nursing Educators have spoken against the use of simulation for a very bizarre reason. In the latest “Clinical Simulation in Nursing” Journal December 2016 Volume 12, Issue 12, INACSL Journal Editor Suzan “Suzie” Kardong-Edgren explains a major misunderstanding about the use of healthcare simulation.

In the edition, Suzie provides a powerful reminder about the challenges faced for simulation in nursing education, and “what simulation is and how it is evolving”. In my opinion, the laggards of simulation technology adoption will cite any and every reason to reject modern advances in educational practices as the scapegoat for systematic failures. Another must-read commentary by one of our community’s most influential thought leaders entitled “High Fidelity Educators” which you can read here:

“A recent Researchgate citation alert led me to a most interesting editorial by Dean, Williams, and Balnaves (2016) entitled Living dolls and nurses without empathy. The lack of general understanding about what simulation is and how it is evolving, demonstrated in the editorial, provided fodder for thoughtful commentaries from many in the simulation community. This evolving commentary can be found in the blog section of the Journal of Advanced Nursing. It is well worth a read.

It remains very clear that a segment of the nursing education community does not understand that simulation is not about the manikin. However, learner deficits identified during simulation can be easily scapegoated because of the use of simulation. The upshot of the Dean et al. editorial is that nursing students are demonstrating less empathy and that the use of plastic dolls contributes to this. I contend a noted lack of empathy is not new (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010) but that we can clearly see it now during simulation.

Part of the skill set required of a simulation educator is choosing the right kind of simulation (standardized patient, manikin, or task trainer) to accomplish a learning outcome. It is probably not ideal to have a learning outcome of empathy embedded in a manikin-based simulation, but it is certainly possible. Many of us have seen student learners crying at the end of a manikin-based scenario.

Simulation has allowed us to more clearly identify those students who might lean toward a less empathic nature. I might not have noticed a lack of student empathy with a real patient in the past because I, as the faculty member, was there, beside the student and interacting empathetically with a patient, whether the student was capable of doing so or not. In reality, we know our students’ skills and abilities much better after a simulation than we know their abilities within the clinical setting. I became a much more astute educator after seeing my verbally skilled students say some unbelievable things to patients, during simulation.

Working in simulation, one becomes a high-fidelity educator. Admittedly, manikins provide only partial fidelity. The facilitator sets the scene, the mood, observes, diagnoses, and debriefs the scenario. If fidelity is defined as the “degree of accuracy to which a simulation, whether it is physical, mental, or both, represents a given frame of reality in terms of cues and stimuli, and permissible action” (Tun, Alinier, Tang, & Kneebone, 2015 p. 164), it is the educator (facilitator) who orchestrates this fidelity and brings it home, during the debriefing. Students missing opportunities to develop or demonstrate empathetic communication skills can be debriefed in a simulation setting and can try it again, preparing for real patients and families. Arguably, the best clinical educators today are those who work in both simulation and the clinical setting. They are true high-fidelity educators.”

Featured Articles in This Edition:

  • Utilization of the Simulation Environment to Practice Teach-Back With Kidney Transplant Patients – Kara Mangold
  • Acting With a Purpose: The Lived Experience of Actors in the Role of Standardized Patients Portraying Mental Illness – Judith M. Jarosinski, Debra A. Webster
  • Generalizability Theory: An Introduction With Application to Simulation Evaluation – Susan K. Prion, Gregory E. Gilbert, Katie A. Haerling
  • Nursing and Social Work Trauma Simulation: Exploring an Interprofessional Approach – Sara J. Manning, David M. Skiff, Lizette P. Santiago, Andrew Irish
  • Logistical Planning and Making the Move to a New Simulation Space – Jan Barber, Ashley Eberhardt, Brooklyn Kennedy, Suzie Kardong-Edgren
  • Making Sense of Methods and Measurement: Lawshe’s Content Validity Index – Gregory E. Gilbert, Susan Prion

Read the latest edition on the Clinical Simulation in Nursing Website!

Canadian Simulationists Breathe Life Into Training Manikins

Simulationists breathe life into training manikins

The press coverage of healthcare simulation continues to catch the public’s attention at facilities across the world! Recently this awesome article covered the work of Canadian-based Fanshawe College nursing simulations, and the connection to Ontario’s SIM-One group:

Fanshawe nursing students work with a simulator to hook up a colonoscopy bag. Christine Link sits inside a small room with two-way glass, watching a young woman in the classroom beyond. The nursing student seems unsure what to do with an elderly male patient in the bed in front of her. She lingers by the supply cart, as if looking for something. Link speaks through a microphone, which comes out of the manikin as a scratchy, old-man’s voice. She is playing the role of George, a grumpy senior with a respiratory condition. “Get me a drink of water,” commands Link. George has dirty tissues filled with fake mucus scattered around him. As the student fetches a cup, Link explains that she is waiting for the perfect teaching moment. “I would have the student hold it up to my mouth, and that’s when I’d cough.”

Link is one of a growing number of simulation experts working in medical, paramedic and nursing programs across the country. “Health care has really come a long way in how we teach and present material,” she says. “No longer are we injecting into an orange.” Link, who graduated from the practical nursing program at Fanshawe College in 2007, returned to the Ontario school as a part-time lab technician the following year. After stints as an instructor, in 2013 she became the simulation technologist, now responsible for running 15 manikins.

At SIM-one in Toronto, a non-profit, national networking, training and R&D organization with 1,700 members involved in health-care simulation, CEO Timothy Willett says every college and university in the country has adopted the technique. In Ontario alone, 78 different programs and labs are using a total of 1,236 manikins and thousands more simulation tools.

SIM-one offers several online and in-person courses, including the brand-new 12-week Simulation Scenario Writing, Roleplay Theatre and Simulation Wizardry. They also train experienced simulationists to run their own courses, and each year about 15 to 20 are certified as simulation educators after they have completed three courses at a total cost of about $2,000. “As far as I know, there’s no kind of college programs you can go to with the intent of getting into that role,” says Willett.

Vet Students Train with Simulators in New Lab at Cornell University

Vet Students Train with Simulators in New Lab at Cornell University

Did you know that the use of high-fidelity simulators is increasing rapidly for veterinary sciences? Check out these recent developments from Cornell University:

The Tetlow and Roy Park Veterinary Innovation Laboratory functions as a classroom and a workshop that will change the way veterinary medicine is taught. The laboratory was built with generous support from the Parks and the Triad Foundation, and is housed in Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM).

The lab is the brainchild of Daniel Fletcher , a veterinarian and biomedical engineer who teaches and practices emergency and critical care at CVM and Cornell’s Companion Animal Hospital.

Fletcher the engineer was fascinated with the computer-operated human simulators used to train medical students to address symptoms such as rapid heartbeat and labored breathing. Fletcher the educator wondered why there weren’t animal simulators for veterinary students. He purchased a human simulator and began stripping it for parts. The first “smart” pet, a dog, debuted in 2010 . By 2013, Fletcher was heading a simulation center and helping to develop new manikin products!

Center for Medical Simulation Hosts Alaskan Healthcare Providers for Frontline Training

CMS Hosts Alaskan Healthcare Providers

The opportunity to train for frontline medical cases in rural areas is limitless with simulation. Recently Harvard’s CMS hosted Alaskan healthcare educators to provide a master course in the latest simulation learning best practices:

Recently, Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation hosted two Alaskan healthcare providers, Susan Davis, EMT, CHP-c, and Danita Koehler, MD. Susan and Danita came to CMS representing Eastern Aleutian Tribes , a healthcare corporation working alongside the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium to provide health services to communities in the Aleutian Islands and on the Alaska and Kenai peninsulas. These programs are part of the Alaska Community Health Aide Program, which provides resources to a network of more than 550 healthcare providers serving more than 170 rural villages throughout Alaska. ANTHC is Alaska’s second largest healthcare employer, with over 2,500 employees.

Susan and Danita attended the CMS Comprehensive Instructor Workshop in order to further their goal of bringing simulation training to these healthcare programs. The Community Health Aides / Practitioners who work in the CHAP program are the primary providers in their communities, working with limited resources to provide health education, prevent disease and injury, and ensure safe water and sewer services. These community providers work in conjunction with remote providers at hospitals, using teleconferencing to examine patients, discuss treatment options, and determine whether medevac resources are required in critical situations.

Simulation training will allow these frontline providers to safely train on and improve response times to many potential clinical situations, including early recognition of crucial signs and symptoms for issues like shock, sepsis, and psychiatric distress. Having spent a week at CMS training with an international and interprofessional team of healthcare providers, Susan and Danita are now better equipped to create, operate, and evangelize simulation programs for their healthcare organizations and their communities.

Do you train for rural healthcare with simulation? Tweet us @HealthySim and let us know how!