23rd Annual SESAM Simulation Meeting Opens in Paris

simulation paris 2017

Yesterday in Paris at the Centre Universitaire des Saints-Pères, the 23rd annual Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM), opened its exhibit floor and sessions to Europe’s medical simulation community. Tonight, attendees will be treated to a candlelight gala dinner on the top of the Eiffel Tower!

Today, François Taddei provided the opening address covering the history and state of education in healthcare. François Taddei is the Director of the CRI (Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity) in Paris, which offers dedicated facilities hosting visiting professors, a wide choice of courses and several student discussion clubs. CRI’s main role is to promote new pedagogies to help creative students take initiatives and develop their research projects, with the help of mentors, research institutions, private companies and foundations, such as the Bettencourt Foundation, which has supported many student-created activities. These activities range from the first French synthetic biology team (for the MIT-sponsored iGEM Competition) to the Paris-Montagne science festival and the Science Académie, an outreach program that allows high school students from deprived neighborhoods to discover the creativity of science.


Sponsored Advertisement:


SimGHOSTS, SoFraSimS and IPSS leadership helped provide additional session content, including a plenary session by Dr. Scott Crawford about the future of technology in healthcare.

Exhibit show highlights include SimCharacters Preterm Simulator Paul, SimforHealth’s VR learning platform MedicActiV, high-fidelity ventilation management with Laerdal’s SimMan 3G, new infant simulators from LifeCast Body, and SAM III from Cardionics.

The event continues through Friday afternoon with full days of keynotes, presentations and exhibit hall news — all of which you can follow along with the hashtag #SESAM2017.


Sponsored Advertisement:


Simulation Track Featured at Leaping Forward Oncology Lisbon 2017 Conference

leaping forward simulation

Our friend Filipe Costa, Diretor do Centro de Gestão- Oncologia Hospital da Luz in Portugal, recently shared about the simulation track taking place at the 2017 Leaping Forward Clinical Congress May 9th-13th in Lisbon:

Cancer is expected to be the leading cause of death in developed countries, considering the increase in life expectancy. On the other hand, due to better treatment results, the number of cancer survivors is also increasing. From 9 to 13 May 2017, Hospital da Luz will host the Leaping Forward Oncology – International Clinical Congress, taking place in Lisbon, at Centro Cultural de Belém. The event will gather many of the most renowned world experts in the field, to discuss and debate topics in disease-oriented sessions on gastrointestinal, lung, breast, urologic, gynecologic, hematology and central nervous system cancers.

These will be complemented by additional sessions dedicated to more transversal topics, such as Cancer Immunotherapy, Palliative Care, Cardio-Oncology, Diet and Cancer, Nursing in Oncology, and Simulation. A few afternoon sessions dedicated to Robotic Surgery, Interventional Radiology, and Endoscopy will provide hands-on experience. Hospital da Luz network is managed by Luz Saúde, one of the largest private healthcare groups in Portugal. The Leaping Forward Oncology – International Clinical Congress reflects our commitment to excellence and innovation in Medicine. Above all, it will be an ideal forum where participants can share knowledge and experience, concerning the best practice and innovative solutions in the field of Oncology.

SIMULATION IN ONCOLOGY TRACK

02:15 PM Opening & registration
02:30 PM Welcome and introduction Francisca Leite [PT] | Rui Maio [PT]
02:45 PM Innovation in Biomedical education Madalena Patrício [PT]
03:15 PM Educational technology and innovations to training and patient care using simulation Fernando Bello [UK]
03:45 PM Pro-con debate: the impact of simulation on translational patient outcomes Pro: William Mcgaghie [US] TBC Con: Nuno Freitas [PT]
04:15 PM F1 tech in the outside world – How Williams’s pit perfection can improve healthcare teams Gemma Fisher [UK] TBC
04:45 PM Coffee Break 05:15 PM Cancer and the medical simulation center – The MD Anderson´s experience Gregory Botz [US]
05:45 PM Post simulation era in medicine Richard Satava [US]
06:15 PM Closing remarks

Learn more about the Congress on the Leaping Forward Website!

HealthySim’s Favorite New Products from #IMSH2017

sym eyes healthcare simulator video eyes

This has been an amazing week for healthcare simulation with a huge number of new products proudly displayed at the 2017 International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare. Over the next few months we will start posting in-depth video interviews with vendors from across the floor — but for now we wanted to share the most awesome new product highlights that blew us away!

  • CAE Healthcare Sets new bar for high-fidelity simulator eyes: Sym Eyes are LCD screen eyes that react to movement in front of them AND light. Each pupil can be set to act independently as well, to demonstrate head injuries. They will be standard in new Maternal Birthing simulators and are estimated to last 5 years.
  • Laerdal Begins Campaign to Save Every Life with donations to NPSF:  Laerdal’s Every Life campaign acknowledges lives lost or harmed due to preventable medical error and strives to connect all of us to the common goal of improving patient safety. Please join them in raising awareness about this important cause!
  • EMS SimulationIQ Launches “Phone Video Capture” Capability: Imagine a world where you could simply your simulation program could use your smart phones to capture video content for your events? That world is coming thanks to SimulationIQ’s Training In Motion systems — details coming soon.
  • Gaumard Unveils Super Tory — Simulation’s first “moving” ManikinWeighing only 8lbs and completely wireless, Gaumard set the new bar for infant simulation with Super Tory S2200 explaining that “every visual assessment provides a wealth of health information. That’s why Super Tory features lifelike limb and facial movements and programmable skin coloration that can simulate the range of visual cues seen in ill and healthy newborns.”
  • iSimulate Improves Reality of Mobile Simulation Systems and Creates Realti: iSimulate, a company always on the edge of cutting edge innovations in medical simulation has updated their iPad based vital sign systems with realistic looking monitor designs, starting with ZOLL. They have also enabled programs to use iPads for real-time video capture and debriefing via Apple products. Their partner MDT also unveiled a new infant fidelity manikin prototype that was extremely realistic and had puppet like mouth controls.
  • SIMCharacters launches Paul, The World’s First High Emotion Simulator: (Note: The author of this article is currently consulting for SIMChracters). Paul was overwhelmingly praised as an extremely realistic preterm infant simulator aged at 27 weeks with a 3D printed airway based off real MRI scans of premature babies. Their facebook video went viral during the event crossing 4,000,000 views!
  • Medical-X Shows Us What Full Range of Manikin Motion Really Means: Medical-X, creators of the Nena showed the IMSH trade show floor what “real motion” meant with the latest of Adam-X, a full bodied adult manikin built on an actual bone metal skeleton, allowing for dynamic range of patient motion that is unmatched in the industry.
  • Simulab Launches PacerMan for Immersive Transvenous Pacing Training: A very large crowd gathered around the Simulab booth for a demonstration of the PacerMan system from Simulab, who know produce the only trainer for the effective training of Immersive Transvenous Pacing. The system comes with a computer interface system for educators to make specific training outcomes and real-time learner performance.

This is by far not a comprehensive list of the trade show floor but a quick recap of the amazing video interviews coming soon to HealthySimulation.com for those of you unable to attend or see it all!

Join our newsletter to ensure you get future emails regarding these video updates and more!


Sponsored Advertisement:


Integrating Scenario-Based Simulation Into Radiology Education Improves Learning Outcomes

radiology simulation research

Check out the conclusion of this Dovepress Journal Research entitled “Integrating of scenario-based simulation into radiology education to improve critical thinking skills”, which found that “the integration of scenario-based simulations in radiology education led to a positive impact on learning outcomes, formative interactive learning, and filling the gap between theory and practice. Moreover, it promoted critical thinking skills and allowed radiology professionals to demonstrate their knowledge of similar cases.”

The article was published November 7th, 2016 by authors Abuzaid MM and Elshami W from, Medical Diagnostic Imaging Department, College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

Introduction: For many years, conventional radiographic films have been used for radiology education. Nevertheless, advances in imaging modalities, image quality, and the number of images produced by various methods have seen a move toward digital formats. Certainly, a patient’s case has a significant value in medical education; it can transfer theoretical knowledge to real experiences. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of scenario-based simulations in radiology education and their impact on professional learning outcomes.

Materials and methods: Patient scenarios were collected and converted to digital teaching files, each supported by clinical history, anatomy illustration, as well as medical and radiological investigation. The scenarios were presented online to radiology professionals for 6 months. At the end of the study, the scenarios were evaluated regarding design, content, and their role in improving critical thinking.

Results: Twenty-two scenarios were published online covering various radiology areas. Two hundred and thirty-eight radiology professionals were invited, and 84% participated in the evaluation process. Each participant completed an average of 13 scenarios with an approximate time of 23 minutes for each. The majority of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the scenarios were well designed (94%), were appropriate to their level of knowledge (70%), and helped them in critical thinking and in understanding similar cases (79%).

You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

new tech in healthcare

Chris Merritt, recently wrote an article for McKnights News on the evolution of healthcare education through modern day technologies — which should be forwarded along to simulation discomfiters, or naysayers, in your simulation program! Chris theorizes that online gaming is the future of healthcare education!

The rapid advancements in technology continuously impact our lives on a daily basis and each new week brings a critical update to our attention. This has significantly changed the ways in which we receive and process information such as current events, the daily news, industry updates, association content, medical journals and even our educational materials. You do not need to look any further than a grade-school classroom in which personal tablets have replaced pencil and paper for our youngest generation. This transformation has occurred not because it is the cheapest alternative, in fact this migration can often times be more expensive on the front-end.

We are changing our educational delivery mechanisms due to improved learner experience, retention and overall knowledge outcomes. A 2008 study by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation reported that a great lecture can improve learning outcomes by 17%, while switching to a different delivery mechanism such as serious gaming can improve learning outcomes by 108%.

Many have acknowledged the explicit need for our healthcare professionals to have a safe environment in which to practice, make mistakes and increase their proficiency in the many critical decisions they make on a daily basis without putting a patient at risk. A 2015 study in The Journal of Clinical Nursing reported in 2015 that, “Finding a new platform to allow all nurses to practice difficult clinical decisions is key. A virtual immersive environment…can provide simulation for nurses to practice making such difficult decisions.”

The evidence is present that these online simulations increase learner engagement and retention while also resulting in improved patient outcomes and a positive impact on healthcare economics. One chronic disease specific online simulation called SiMCare Diabetes has published data which reports: improved glycemic control in patients with A1C >7%, a 60% reduction in the prescription of contraindicated medication and reduced cost by $71 per patient versus those professionals that did not train with the simulation.

Advances in medical education, clinical content, guidelines and standards of care now have a new and improved medium for dissemination. Online training simulations and educational games are continually updated in real-time and given the nature of the platform, content can be rapidly deployed around the globe with the click of a button.


Sponsored Advertisement:


ASPE Asia-Pacific Conference Opens at National University of Singapore

aspe 2016 singapore asia pacific standardized patients

HealthySimulation was on hand today for the opening of the Association for Standardized Patient Educators Asia-Pacific Conference which took place at the National University of Singapore Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine. Over 100 participants from around the region and the world came together for three days to focus on the methodology and application of Standardized Patient education within healthcare programs.

Grace Gephardt Director, PULSE Center at Arkansas Children’s Hospital and President of ASPE opened the show and reminded participants about the online learning opportunities on the ASPE website.

The opening keynote address was provided by Professor Carol Pfeiffer PhD, Professor Emeritus of Medicine at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine on the “History and Development of SP Methodology”. Her presentation helped to define SPs and assessment opportunities using them, described the historical history of SPs , provided a working definition of instrument validity, as well as cited several forms of evidence supporting the validity of SP training.

About ASPE

The Association of Standardized Patient Educators (ASPE) is the international organization of simulators educators dedicated to: promoting best practices in the application of SP methodology for education, assessment and research. ASPE fosters the dissemination of research and scholarship in the field of SP methodology and advances the professional knowledge and skills of its members. ASPE transforms professional performance through the power of human interaction.

Learn more by following @HealthySim, @ASPE_tweets and visiting ASPEducators.org!

Poverty Simulation Helps Shape Future Healthcare Professionals

poverty simulation

Has your nursing program considered running a poverty simulation? Help your healthcare learners not only see the benefits of simulation outside the lab context, but also better understand the difficulties faced by less fortunate members of your community. Here’s how NDSU is using simulation to teach their nursing students about poverty:

Students at the NDSU School of Nursing at Sanford Health in Bismarck will get a glimpse into how a family in poverty navigates the complexities of life. More than 60 senior nursing students are scheduled to take part in a poverty simulation experience at Bismarck State College.

During the simulation, the nursing students will role-play the lives of low-income families, from single parents trying to care for their children to senior citizens trying to maintain their self-sufficiency on Social Security. The task of each family is to provide food, shelter and other basic necessities while interacting with various community resources.

Brittney Mueller, simulation coordinator at NDSU School of Nursing at Sanford Health, said the goal is to enable participants to view poverty from different angles and begin to understand what life is like with a shortage of money over an extended period of time. “As nurses embark on their careers, they will one day work with patients facing difficult decisions on a regular basis,” said Mueller. “Deciding whether to buy food or pay for health care is something that some people may face on a monthly basis.


Supported Organization:


The Newest Medical Simulation Center Designs May Surprise You!

designing a sim center

Looking for inspiration for your new sim center? Check out these four new simulation buildings, including a very innovative design from Columbia University:

1) The Vagelos Education Center, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler (as Executive Architect), is a new medical and graduate education building at Columbia University’s Medical Center. The building’s design—which weaves together state-of-the-art medical simulation clinics and labs, tech-enabled classrooms, communal areas for study and socializing, and event spaces—reflects how medicine is taught, learned, and practiced in the 21st century.

Learn more about the Vagelos Education Center at Columbia University

2) The Stephen F. Austin State University Richard and Lucille Dewitt School of nursing is one of only three facilities in Texas that has an onsite simulation lab: The Ed and Gwen Cole Simulation Laboratory, a Laerdal Center of Educational Excellence. The simulation lab is 9,000 square feet with a 10-bed medical surgical area, labor and delivery area, nursery and neonatal area, health assessment lab and an emergency room area. Real medical equipment like IV pumps and crash carts add to the reality of the simulation lab. “It’s a bridge between what we teach the students in class and actual clinical, face-to-face, live humans,” David Smith, coordinator of the simulation lab and clinical instructor, said. “It gives the students a chance to put into practice what they’re learning in class in a risk-free environment.”

Learn more about the new Austin State Sim Lab

3) Hibbing Community College: Over the past three years, Hibbing Community College has developed their new hi-tech Healthcare Simulation Center. They have three rooms that include two clinic bays, an OB and ICU unit, a homecare area, and an infectious control setup. “It’s just cutting edge. It’s preparing students for future practice and it’s real life right in front of them,” said the Director of Nursing, Sandy Gustafson. The health center features high-fidelity mannequins that breathe, have pulses and heart tones, and one even simulates child birth. Students get the hands-on experience they wouldn’t get just by watching in a real hospital setting.

Learn more about the Hibbing Community College Sim Center

4) St. Clair County Community College: The students were working in the newly renovated health simulation labs in the AJ Theisen Building. The renovation is the result of a $350,000 project that combined older medical and surgical simulation equipment with new tools and moved them to the annex of the Theisen Building. Having students work in simulation labs, in which the verbal manikin have pulses and students can hear their hearts and lungs, is not exactly a new concept for SC4 — they have been doing this for the past six years. However, the old simulation lab was in the basement of the Clara E. Mackenzie Building and in a less realistic setting.

Learn more about the St. Clair County Simulation Building

SimulationIQ IPE Provides Case-Based Virtual Patient Training For Healthcare Teams

ipe learning system online

Did you know that half of the suggested 440,000 deaths attributed to medical error are communication related? By providing healthcare students and professionals with more ways to study case based simulations, online, in their own time, together — is certainly a must have for every healthcare organization. What attracts me to this learning system is that multiple learning participants can participate on a case scenario which follows a patient over time, letting educators see communication between IPE over a longer period of time, even ongoing!

Enter SIMULATIONiQ IPE. Education Management Solutions, providers of SimulationIQ, now provide this case-based virtual patient IPE solution replicates different disciplines working together on a common case using an innovative technology platform. The IPE solution can be used to augment existing IPE programs and allow your faculty to operate at maximum efficiency, so that instructors can focus on what they do best: educate.

 

Breakdown in Communication

SIMULATIONiQ IPE provides full visibility of case, actions, treatment plan across all professions to facilitate cross-discipline communication.

  • Role-based practice simulation
  • Integrated chat and discussion forum functions

Misdiagnosis

To avoid misdiagnosis, SIMULATIONiQ IPE offers visibility to diagnosis and care plan across disciplines to facilitate shared decision making.  This integrated team approach is facilitated by:

  • An interactive team-based question solution
  • Robust communication options including – voice conferencing, screen sharing, chat and discussion forums
  • Simulation scenario sessions to augment online or traditional courses

Coordination of Care

To improve coordination of care it provides immediate feedback to actions and orders that inform and allow for better coordination of the patient care team.

  • Real-time lab and discussion results
  • Total visibility to all facets of patient care
  • Assessment of best practice care knowledge through team and role-based questions
  • Reflective debrief to develop critical thinking skills

Learn more at the SimulationIQ IPE Website!

SESAM Lisbon 2016 Day 2 Updates

sesam 2016

Day 1 Recap can be found here.

SESAM’s Clinical Simulation Conference with Dubai Update

Helen Henderson, Lead Simulation Educator from the Khalaf Ahmad Al Habtoor Medical Simulation Center in Dubai Healthcare City provided an update about the 3 year partnership between SESAM and the Dubai based simulation center for simulation conferences. Helen shared details about the past 3 years of events and invited attendees to the International Medical Education Conference in Dubai at the newly renamed Mohammad Bin Rashid Medical University March 2nd – 4th 2017, with the tagline “Health Professional Education in an Interconnected World”.

Plenary Address by Faizal Haji

Following this, Faizal A. Haji provided the presentation “Promises and pitfalls simulation in resource-limited settings”, highlighting updates from the International Pediatric Society in Simulation’s work to develop simulation training support for the African country of Malawi. Malawi, with a population of about 15 million only has about 1/3 of the health workforce it needs to serve its citizens. IPSS has been working with the Malawi Ministry of Health in 2013, starting with a needs assessment of the clinical training services available to healthcare professionals within the country using field notes, key interviews, site visits, and simulation demonstrations. When the number of healthcare professionals was increased, clinical training was reduced because of a lack of faculty — and the quality of providers drastically decreased over the past 10 years. The team investigated the use of telesimulation training to provide education across long distances live with visual aids. While the training programs worked, there was still a need to provide hands-on training but the time to receive such training was extremely limited. While resources such as simulation technology are available (through donations), but because of the limited clinical faculty training was rare.

Faizal highlighted the research article “Development of a simulation and skills centre in east Africa: a Rwandan – Canadian partnership” which succeeded because of:

  1. Long-term partnership
  2. Identification of need for dedicated funding for space/staff
  3. locally driven curriculum
  4. Ongoing mentorship beyond the initial train-the-trainers program.

Faizal concluded by reminding us that we need to be understanding of the health systems we are building simulation programs for, and that we are absolutely able to address high level system issues with low resource simulations to then do focused programatic training in key issue areas.

  • Partnerships make the project work
  • Context matters and educational interventions don’t exist in vaccuum
  • Process matters: how you implement training is just as important to consider as the content itself
  • Bad Habits are hard to fix so be sure to start training programs strong!

Stay tuned to this article for updates throughout the day, and follow the action on #SESAM2016!