Center for Medical Simulation Hosts Alaskan Healthcare Providers for Frontline Training

CMS Hosts Alaskan Healthcare Providers

The opportunity to train for frontline medical cases in rural areas is limitless with simulation. Recently Harvard’s CMS hosted Alaskan healthcare educators to provide a master course in the latest simulation learning best practices:

Recently, Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation hosted two Alaskan healthcare providers, Susan Davis, EMT, CHP-c, and Danita Koehler, MD. Susan and Danita came to CMS representing Eastern Aleutian Tribes , a healthcare corporation working alongside the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium to provide health services to communities in the Aleutian Islands and on the Alaska and Kenai peninsulas. These programs are part of the Alaska Community Health Aide Program, which provides resources to a network of more than 550 healthcare providers serving more than 170 rural villages throughout Alaska. ANTHC is Alaska’s second largest healthcare employer, with over 2,500 employees.

Susan and Danita attended the CMS Comprehensive Instructor Workshop in order to further their goal of bringing simulation training to these healthcare programs. The Community Health Aides / Practitioners who work in the CHAP program are the primary providers in their communities, working with limited resources to provide health education, prevent disease and injury, and ensure safe water and sewer services. These community providers work in conjunction with remote providers at hospitals, using teleconferencing to examine patients, discuss treatment options, and determine whether medevac resources are required in critical situations.


Sponsored Advertisement:


Simulation training will allow these frontline providers to safely train on and improve response times to many potential clinical situations, including early recognition of crucial signs and symptoms for issues like shock, sepsis, and psychiatric distress. Having spent a week at CMS training with an international and interprofessional team of healthcare providers, Susan and Danita are now better equipped to create, operate, and evangelize simulation programs for their healthcare organizations and their communities.

Do you train for rural healthcare with simulation? Tweet us @HealthySim and let us know how!


Sponsored Advertisement:


Jenny Rudolph from Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation Reminds Us “Excellent Debriefing is Invisible”

medical simulation documentary

On the Center for Medical Simulation’s website there was recently a short post from Jenny Rudolph PhD, Senior Director of the Institute for Medical Simulation, reminding us that “excellent debriefing is invisible”. Jenny connects subtle interviewing techniques to simulation debriefing to show us how the participant should remain the center of the conversation.  As a documentary film-maker, I have spent countless hours learning the delicate craft of interviewing. Check out my articles on the Lessons from Documentary Film-Making for Simulation Champs, and Creating Realism in Simulation to learn more about this fascinating topic!

 

From Jenny:

“When I watch or listen to interviews I’ve noticed something.  In excellent interviews like in excellent debriefings, the questions and questioner seem to fade into the background and the story and ideas of the learner or interviewee stand out.  Like a well-designed setting for a precious gem, or good lighting in the theater, good debriefing and interviewing is not that noticeable. This is ironic because it takes some effort and practice to master the interview and debriefing techniques to be invisible. 

A lovely 2.5 minute example of this is Joshua Gubitz’s interview of his 85 year-old friend Len Berk. When Berk retired as a CPA he got himself hired as a salmon slicer at a gourmet deli in NYC.  Although this clip no doubt benefitted from skillful audio editing, you will notice that Josh Gubitz just taps the topic along, with little follow-up questions, or a chuckle of encouragement.  He doesn’t get in the way of Berk telling his story.  Gubitz’s underlying feeling of interest and positive regard for Berk and Berk’s inherent love of salmon slicing do the rest.”

Listen to the 2.5 minute interview and learn more about CMS Training Programs here!

Boston Children’s Hospital ‘SIMPeds’ Program Provides Expanded Simulation Resources

simpeds

At IPSSW 2015 I had the opportunity to learn more about Boston Children’s Hospital’s SIMPeds program, which enables area wide simulation training, testing, networking, and innovative engineering opportunities — as well as consulting for programs with specific needs. Lead by Peter Weinstock MD, PhD, Anesthesia Chair in Pediatric Simulation Senior Associate in Critical Care Medicine Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, SIMPeds has recently expanded its programs into a number of key areas encompassing the “SIMPeds Ecosystem”:

simpeds ecosystem

SIMPeds SIM Network division reaches beyond walls to connect Boston Children’s to its families as well as local and regional pediatric healthcare community. Goals of SIM Network are to produce novel mechanisms to cascade BCH “know how” throughout the community as well as to develop sustainable simulation activities to occur on-site to support partnering institutions. Partners include the BCH Network Hospitals, Pre-hospital/EMS, Massachusetts Fire and Police Departments. SIM Network innovatively reaches our families and caregivers by providing pre-discharge SIM education to mitigate anxiety through education and prepare and facilitate easy and safe transitions. SIMPeds can consult to assist with the development of your international simulation center. Click the link below to learn more.

Read the rest of this entry »


Sponsored Advertisement:


Center For Medical Simulation Emphasizes Simulation Instructor Reflection

harvard medical simulation

Gary Rossi, Chief Operating Officer at Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation recently shared this video interview of Jenny Rudolph, Associate Director for the Institute for Medical Simulation, which was taken during a visit to Spain’s Hospital Virtual Valdecilla:

Earlier this summer during a faculty retreat at the Hospital Virtual Valdecilla (HvV), Jenny Rudolph recorded this video where she talks about the importance of people and their ability to reflect and understand their thinking and emotions as simulation instructors.

The Hospital Virtual Valdecilla is an Affiliate of the Center for Medical Simulation. It serves a reference Center for Simulation throughout Spain, Mexico, Central and South America. 

About CMS:

Founded in 1993, CMS was one of the world’s first healthcare simulation centers and continues to be a global leader in the field.

Simulation training at CMS gives healthcare providers a new and enlightening perspective on how to handle real medical situations. Through high-fidelity scenarios that simulate genuine crisis management situations, the CMS experience can open new chapters in the level of healthcare quality that participants provide.

At CMS the focus is on communication, collaboration, and crisis management in order to develop skills and teamwork behaviors that are best learned actively under realistic conditions. Since it first opened in 1993, CMS has run over two thousand courses and trained thousands of participants using its innovative and challenging scenarios. We are proud to feature:

  • A multidisciplinary, expert staff, affiliated with some of the world’s most well-known and well-respected hospitals, medical universities and colleges
  • Exceptionally high-quality and innovative programs in full-environment facilities
  • A breadth of course offerings

CMS has been a leader in the healthcare simulation field since putting its first mannequin simulator into service in 1994. We have developed courses for clinicians, healthcare educators, administrators and managers, conducted research on a spectrum of topics, helped manufacturers to conduct human factors trials of their technologies and continue to initiate an array of healthcare simulation activities.

For more information about CMS’ Affiliate Program , Consulting & Training Services be sure to visit the CMS Website!

Center for Medical Simulation Holds Instructor Workshop

medical simulation instructor training

Another note from Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation for those clinical educators looking to receive simulation-based training.  CMS is holding an Instructor Workshop from October 2nd – 5th in New York.

CMS Faculty will be heading to New York where they’ll teach the internationally recognized Institute for Medical Simulation (IMS) “Simulation as a Teaching Tool” Simulation Instructor Workshop at the Institute for Medical Simulation and Learning (IMSAL)at the Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx.

Taught by CMS’ Harvard faculty, the Simulation as a Teaching Tool Workshop is a 4-day intensive immersion in healthcare simulation that is specifically designed for those educators seeking to develop high quality simulation programs. It covers high level elements and concepts involved in using simulation as a teaching tool.

The daily formats vary and include simulation scenarios, lectures, small and large group discussions, and practical exercises with feedback. Ample opportunities are provided for networking and sharing experiences. Attendees join a growing community of Institute graduates who are positioned as leaders in the field.

Download the CMS October Training Flyer

Dates: October 2-5
Tuition for this workshop is $4,225

To learn more about the workshop, or to apply, visit the Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) website’s IMS webpage at http://www.harvardmedsim.org/ims/html.


Sponsored Advertisement: