Syndaver Showcases Synthetic Cadaver and EMS SimulationIQ Partnership at IMSH 2016

syndaver recording simulationiq

In this video interview from the IMSH 2016 exhibit hall, we learn more about a new partnership between Syndaver and EMS SimulationIQ to increase the learning opportunities for those that are educating healthcare learners with synthetic cadavers. Watch this exclusive HealthySimulation.com video interview from the trade show floor to learn more about Syndaver’s Anatomy Model and this new A/V recording / statistics capturing partnership with EMS SimulationIQ:

About the New Partnership:

During the three-day conference the two companies will demonstrate what they believe to be the most medically accurate and comprehensive medical training simulation system built to date. This system will utilize a combination of SynDaver’s flagship Synthetic Patient model and EMS’s SIMULATIONiQ operating platform.


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The SynDaver Synthetic Human is the most life-like synthetic human mannequin ever created, while EMS’s SIMULATIONiQ platform provides software and equipment that drives the entire simulation process and provides feedback, debriefings and audio and visual playbacks.

“We are excited to form this partnership with SynDaver Labs,” said Anurag Singh, CEO of EMS. “By integrating with these mannequins, SIMULATIONiQ customers are able to analyze and assess data over time, enabling our customers to better track the progression of learning.”

By forming this partnership, SynDaver Labs and EMS hope to establish a new standard for medical simulation training systems and better prepare students in the healthcare industry for real-world medical emergencies and patient-care protocols.

“We are constantly looking for ways to provide better products to our clients, and this new partnership with EMS will allow us to do exactly that,” said Dr. Christopher Sakezles, President and founder of SynDaver Labs. “We are thrilled to begin demonstrating the SIMULATIONiQ platform in conjunction with our Synthetic Human at IMSH, and know this is a step in the right direction for the medical education industry as a whole.”

Learn more about Syndaver and EMS SimulationIQ!


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MedicCast Podcast Explores Healthcare Simulation Industry

ems podcast

Recently the famous MedicCast podcast provided an update of the growth of the healthcare simulation industry, and need for specialized simulation training for EMS programs integrating these technologies. Check out this awesome podcast and then learn more about the ProMed Podcast network which also covers Nursing, Disaster Response, and other key healthcare areas.

Listen to the MedicCast Simulation Podcast here:

EMS Tip of the Week: SimGHOSTS Help Educators Simulate Medical Care

According to conservative estimates, more than 440,000 patients die each year from medical errors in the United States alone, and millions more suffer associated injuries. Thankfully, emerging healthcare education simulation programs around the world are addressing this very issue through advances in modern technology. In these sim labs, new students and recertifying professionals enter realistic patient care environments that house high-fidelity, life-like patient manikins that speak, breathe, and react to medications.

In this episode I have Lance Baily on from SimGHOSTS and HealthySimulation. The Gathering of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose goal is to provide the technical and operational training support required by individuals and institutions around the United States and the World that are improving patient care outcomes by educating healthcare professionals via advanced simulated learning environments.

About MedicCast, Part of the ProMed Network 

ProMed Network’s affiliated healthcare online radio and video programming are among the most authoritative sources of their kind worldwide. The live and recorded shows are all dedicated to the improvement of patient care in the prehospital setting. The leading online health and medical podcast network, the ProMed Network shows meet the needs of the healthcare professionals with health related news, commentary, conference coverage, clinical articles, product reviews and more. The ProMed Network is a collection of the top medical and health internet programs produced by independent medical professionals in a variety of fields.

These internet radio and TV shows are commonly known as podcasts. The ProMed Network programs include over 45 programs in fields including medical school, nursing, psychology, virology, emergency medical services, disaster preparedness, and neurology. ProMed Network shows reach 100,000+ health care professionals monthly. The shows comprise some of the top programs in the medical podcasting space. The EMS Programs on the network include programs like:

  • The MedicCast (News, commentary, and tips for EMTs and paramedics)
  • Nursing Show (Interviews, education and news on nursing, education and patient care)
  • EMS Educast (Discussions with the leading educators in EMS and medicine)
  • Brain Science Podcast (Interviews with the leaders in neurology and brain science)
  • EMS 12-Lead Podcast (Focusing on improving cardiac care in communities worldwide)
  • DisasterPodcast.com (Focusing on disaster EMS services)
Listen to the whole podcast and learn more at MedicCast.com

Delta College Performs 6 Hour Trauma Simulation Scenario with Local Authories

long medical simulations

Recently this awesome update was shared by Lori Kloc, MSN, RN, CHSE Simulation Education Specialist at Delta College:

On April 5 Delta College brought seven healthcare disciplines together to participate in one 6-hour trauma scenario. The scenario centered around a victim of an auto accident and included trauma rescue/transport, triage, two surgical procedures, infant resuscitation, post-operative care, and rehabilitation. This scenario was important because it allowed students from various levels of education and disciplines to learn with, from, and about each other in collaborative care of two patients. Simulation is a method of active learning, where students have the opportunity to practice care in a safe setting, promoting teamwork and collaboration while reinforcing skills learned in their academic setting. The objective of simulated learning is the transfer of skills and behaviors to the clinical setting, positively impacting safe patient care.

In this simulation, Mobile Medical Response (MMR) joined the division to add their expertise as first responders for our victim. The simulation will included a mock automobile accident with trauma to a pregnant woman, two surgical procedures, emergency care for the newborn who will be born via C-section but will have sustained injury, and post-op/rehab care for the victim.

Read more on the Delta College Website


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Tomorrow: EMS Global Institute for Simulation Training Provides Free Webinar Series by Moulage Concepts

EMS Webinar

“Bridging the Gap in Simulated Training Exercises”

Our friends at GIST and MoulageConcepts.com are joining up to bring you a powerful webinar on the the utilization of Moulage to increase the realism of your simulation experiences!

Presented by:
Bobbie Merica
Moulage Concepts Inc.

Abstract: In this webinar, educators will learn to enhance realism in simulated nursing scenarios while providing best practice techniques. The use of medical moulage assists the learner in “bridging the gap” between simulated training exercises and real life events. Whether you are just getting started in moulage or looking to advance your techniques, the application of moulage to support patient assessment, injury recognition, and decision making provides a unique training opportunity that enhances the simulation experience.

Objectives:
1. Identify the role of moulage in creating lifelike simulation scenarios
2. Illustrate the benefits of incorporating moulage into the simulation settings
3. Explore strategies to creating powerful learning experiences combining human patient simulators, live actors, and interactive, odorous, three dimensional wounds
4. Discuss options for working within your time and/or budgetary constraints

Sponsored by
The Global Institute for Simulation Training,
the educational arm of
Education Management Solutions.

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

2:00 pm EST
(1:00 pm CST; 12 Noon MST; 11:00 am PST)

Webinars are one hour in length. Space is limited.

Click here to register for this FREE Webinar!

EMS Webinar Tomorrow Wed. Dec. 2nd 2PM EST – “A Look at the Statistics Behind Our Assessments”

ems simulation iq

Join EMS tomorrow Wednesday, December 2 at 2:00 pm EST (1:00 pm CST; 12:00 pm MST; 11:00 am PST) for a free and informational webinar “A Look at the Statistics Behind Our Assessments”.

Abstract: Statistics are ubiquitous in academia. They’re used to assess the performance of learners on a variety of objectives, and careful calculation of statistics is vital to properly evaluate the learners as well as the evaluator. Different rubrics and assessment tools cannot necessarily be subject to the same type of statistics. In this talk, the presenter will take a step back to the basic use of statistics for evaluating learners and convey an array of ideas and methods behind the statistical models. This presentation will not require a mathematical background.

Presented by:

Daniel J. Backlund, Ph.D.
Director of Simulation IT
The F. Marie Hall SimLife Center
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Click here to register.

More Updates from EMS SimulationIQ:

Med Students Crunch Data, Examine Trends – Every first and second year student at the NYU School of Medicine is required to do what’s called a ‘health care by the numbers’ project. Students are given access to an enormous database with more than 5 million anonymous records — information on every hospital patient in the state for the preceding two years. More>>

Trauma Patients Assessed More Quickly After Caregivers Receive Simulation Training – Injured patients were evaluated and received medical imaging tests 30% faster after an innovative performance improvement project was enacted at one hospital. More>>

Multitasking in the ER Means More Patient Safety Hazards – Even after emergency physicians had acclimated to a new commercial electronic health record (EHR), they increased their tasks performed per minute by nearly 12 percent, increasing the potential for patient safety hazards. The results of a study of one hospital’s transition from a homegrown EHR to a commercial EHR were published in Annals of Emergency Medicine. More>>

About Education Management Solutions (EMS)
Medical, nursing, and allied health schools, hospitals, and counseling programs use EMS’ suite of products to more efficiently manage clinical simulation centers, effectively evaluate learner performance, and digitally document simulated events. As the leader in clinical simulation management technology since its founding in 1994, EMS offers a single platform for mannequin- and actor-based medical simulation training with one-call support for both software and hardware. EMS provides a complete turnkey solution that includes integrated software and hardware, design and planning, engineering, configuration, installation, training, file backup, and support.

Visit SimulationIQ.com to learn more!


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SimUshare Lets Fire Instructors Go Beyond Imagination With Real Time Fire Effects Over Images & Videos

simushare

Recently learned of SimUshare’s Fire Training App, which enables you to add fire and smoke effects to a library of pictures and videos, including the ones you take! I definitely wish we had this app during fire academy, to enable our instructors to help us all be on the same page about what we “imaging” the scenario to be. With real time effects that are completely controllable by the instructor, it is easy to talk about an almost limitless number of simulated fire emergency cases with learners and professionals. I believe the app could also be utilized for pre-planning against possible fire scenarios in difficult locations in your district.

SimUshare Features:

  • Rapid Creation of Sims: SimsUshare’s user-friendly interface can be easily mastered without extensive training. Basic sims can be created in minutes; more elaborate sims might take just a little longer.
  • Fire Effects: SimsUshare comes with a large palette of special effects including eight kinds of smoke and fire, explosions, hazardous materials, a variety of people (characters) and much more.
  • Modify Effect Parameters: Change the volume, velocity, density, and color of smoke and fire. Show the effect of wind direction and speed. Narrow, widen or flip effects.
  • Masking Effects: With simple masking techniques fire and smoke will appear to come from behind or even inside objects for increased realism.
  • Time Sequencing: Make effects appear or disappear over a period of time. Effects can gradually increase in intensity. Create a developing situation.
  • Incident View Navigation: Use the easy navigation tools to move around all sides of a structure or even inside it. Perform 360s and site inspections as if you were on location.
  • Snapshots: Capture a snapshot during an operation. Use it later for incident review, analysis and critical thinking. Project it on a larger screen for group discussion.
  • Import Images: If you can take a picture of it, you can build a custom simulation around it. You can also import ready-made simulations from expert contributors in fire safety and training.
  • Capture Video: Capture video directly from within the app (iOS only currently). Upload files from mobile devices to your department’s training website.
  • Sharing: Copy your simulations to another device or save them to shared folders or Dropbox. Collaborate on specific training projects. (Network Edition only)

The app is available in a variety of formats for different operating systems. Learn more at the SimUshare website today!

EMS Simulation Video From Rappahannock Community College Demonstrates Power of Video Promotions

Recently, Rappahannock students in the Emergency Medical Services program took part in a live simulation at the Glenns Campus. The students were exposed to more complicated scenarios than were originally planned. These types of outstanding student experiences are only possible with a state-of-the-art mobile simulation lab. Videos like this one help promote the simulation program at your educational campus — attracting new students who can see the benefits of going to a school where simulation is taken seriously.

Looking to produce your own simulation program promotional video? Learn how in our multiple part series on media production!

For more information about the program visit the Rappahannock EMS website.

More EMS Thoughts of Simulation in EMS Paramedic Programs National Research Survey

ems simulation research

Over the past few months I have been covering the McKenna KD, Carhart E, Bercher D, et al. “Simulation use in paramedic education research (SUPER): A descriptive study.” (Read my report on the article and read the research here). Recently on JEMS.com Alexander L. Trembley, NREMT-P, Elliot Carhart, EdD, RRT, NRP & David Page, MS, NREMT-P added their thoughts with a review of the report as well:

 

“Think back to the roots of your EMS education. No matter when it was, there were probably manikins. From a simple CPR trainer to today’s high-fidelity manikins, the face of EMS education is evolving to include a focus on simulation because it provides consistency and creates clinical opportunities to assess and treat patients who students may not see during their clinical rotations.

Despite this great potential, it’s important to characterize the current use of simulation in EMS education before our profession can move forward in studying and developing best practices for the use of simulation. Researchers from the National Association of EMS Educators (NAEMSE) have filled this void through an effort to help the stakeholders of EMS education target educational initiatives and resources.

Background: Study authors, including Research Review contributor Elliot Carhart, sent surveys to 638 paramedic programs that were accredited or in the process of becoming accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education. The survey consisted of 56 items, primarily multiple-choice questions along with a limited number of open-ended responses for clarification purposes. The questions asked respondents if they had–or had access to–and if they used various types of manikins and other simulation equipment. The survey also captured information about other methods of simulation, such as standardized patients, computer-based scenarios and games, and virtual reality simulation. They also asked about training and the program’s personnel resources. Additional questions focused on how each program used simulation (e.g., teaching, testing, etc.), with other questions designed to capture the respondents’ perspective on the use of simulation in EMS education.

Thoughts: The results of this study suggest that a large portion of the EMS education community is experiencing similar problems with the use of simulation as a training modality. The findings regarding inadequate personnel resources aren’t surprising, as EMS educators must often wear many hats when incorporating simulation into their practical scenarios (e.g., operating equipment while facilitating a simulation). Trying to do too much with too little is likely to lead to frustrated educators, idle equipment and missed opportunities for learning.”

(Editors Note: SimGHOSTS was specifically developed to create the training necessary to empower administrators to increase the speed of medical simulation integration.)

Read the full article review on JEMS.com!

May 20th Webinar: How Mobile Tech Eliminates Disadvantages of a Centralized Simulation Recording System

On May 20th at 2PM EST SimGHOSTS will host yet another fantastic webinar entitled “How Mobile Tech Eliminates Disadvantages of a Centralized System” provided by SG15USA Silver Sponsor EMS.

Learn how to increase your technology utilization in this hour long webinar!

Date & Time: Wednesday May 20th 2PM EST

Registration: Sign up at SimGHOSTS.org

Presenters:

mobile simulation webinar
Deb Danforth MS, ARNP, FAANP
Director of the Charlotte E. Maguire, M.D. and
TMH Clinical Skills and Simulation Center Associate Professor
Florida State University College of Medicine

James McCrea
Regional Sales Specialist
Education Management Solutions

Webinar Abstract:

Little is known about the use of mobile technology for performance-based assessment in decentralized locations. Florida State University, College of Medicine is one of the first schools to take Formative Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (FOSCEs) and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) to faculty and students in six regional campuses and residency programs.

In this presentation, Deb Danforth MS, ARNP, FAANP, director of the Charlotte E. Maguire, M.D. and TMH Clinical Skills and Simulation Center and associate professor at the Florida State University College of Medicine and James McCrea, Regional Sales Specialist at EMS will talk about how the process of implementing OSCEs through mobile simulation training eliminates some of the disadvantages of a centralized program while providing many advantages.

They will also address the ease of integration between the mobile and centralized (enterprise) technologies. Ms. Danforth is an adult nurse practitioner at Neighborhood Health, where her clinical practice focuses on the primary care of African-American and Hispanic adults. She also is an instructor at the Florida AM University (FAMU) College of Pharmacy.

She has presented regionally, nationally, and internationally on topics including OSCEs, diabetes, hypertension, self-esteem in chemically impaired nurses, basic and advanced electrocardiography, and how to use the panoptic ophthalmoscope and macroview otoscope. She has also published numerous articles and book chapters.

Learn more & Register for the webinar on SimGHOSTS.org!

Simulation Use in Paramedic Education Research (SUPER): A Descriptive Study

Back in September we reported from the National Association for EMS Educators (NAEMSE) about Laerdal supported research regarding the utilization of simulation in EMS programs across the United States (Read that recap article here). Just this month the full article entitled “Simulation Use in Paramedic Education Research (SUPER): A Descriptive Study” has been released on informahealthcare.com, with the objective and conclusions shared below.

ems simulation research

Authors: Kim D. McKenna, Elliot Carhart, Daniel Bercher, Andrew Spain, John Todaro, and Joann Freel.

The authors acknowledge the assistance of the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions, the NAEMSE staff members and Justin Weiss.

Laerdal Medical Corporation, a corporate sponsor of NAEMSE, provided financial support for this research. K. McKenna and J. Todaro serve on the NAEMSE board of directors and J. Freel is the executive director. Funds were used to support committee meetings and expenses related to the study. The study was conducted independently of the funders.

“Objectives: The purpose of this research was to characterize the use of simulation in initial paramedic education programs in order assist stakeholders’ efforts to target educational initiatives and resources. This group sought to provide a snapshot of what simulation resources programs have or have access to and how they are used; faculty perceptions about simulation; whether program characteristics, resources, or faculty training influence simulation use; and if simulation resources are uniform for patients of all ages.

Methods. This was a cross-sectional census survey of paramedic programs that were accredited or had a Letter of Review from the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the EMS Professions at the time of the study. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-square analyses.

Results. Of the 638 surveys sent, 389 valid responses (61%) were analyzed. Paramedic programs reported they have or have access to a wide range of simulation resources (task trainers [100%], simple manikins [100%], intermediate manikins [99%], advanced/fully programmable manikins [91%], live simulated patients [83%], computer-based [71%], and virtual reality [19%]); however, they do not consistently use them, particularly advanced (71%), live simulated patients (66%), computer-based (games, scenarios) (31%), and virtual reality (4%). Simulation equipment (of any type) reportedly sits idle and unused in (31%) of programs. Lack of training was cited as the most common reason. Personnel support specific to simulation was available in 44% of programs. Programs reported using simulation to replace skills more frequently than to replace field or clinical hours. Simulation goals included assessment, critical thinking, and problem-solving most frequently, and patient and crew safety least often. Programs using advanced manikins report manufacturers as their primary means of training (87%) and that 19% of faculty had no training specific to those manikins. Many (78%) respondents felt they should use more simulation.

Conclusions: 

These results suggest that simulation in accredited paramedic programs mirrors the proverbial three-legged stool. To ensure simulation is used effectively, programs must have the appropriate equipment, faculty training, and resources. If any of these elements is missing, the stool topples and programs are less likely to use simulation. Administrators must recognize that to maximize the use of simulation within their program, they must view simulation as a fully integrated strategy within their education system. This research provides data for accredited paramedic program personnel to present to administrators to justify requests for faculty education and personnel resources to maximize the use of their simulation equipment.

It is incumbent on program directors to ensure that their faculty has adequate initial and ongoing simulation education, mentors to assist with adoption of new technologies, and sufficient personnel resources and equipment (representing patients of all ages) to promote the most effective use of simulation. Regional and national simulation work groups should be developed to allow faculty to collaborate on simulation best practices within accredited paramedic programs. While there are standardized resources to train nursing faculty on how to use simulation, and generic simulation instruction competencies for healthcare, no specific framework exists specifically geared to guide simulation best practices in the unique prehospital environment. The EMS community should collaborate to provide that framework so that the three-legged stool of simulation will stand firmly on a solid pedagogical foundation to serve as an essential tool for paramedic student learning.”

Thoughts:

Clearly the need for hands-on training in simulation technology is needed to ensure that investments in equipment and staff are made clear here. SimGHOSTS annual hands-on training events and online resources answer this specific call for technical training of simulation technologies. Master degree programs in healthcare simulation from institutions like NYIT, Drexel, and USF, add additional value to clinical educators and administrators of simulation programs. Conferences like INACSL, IPSSW, ASPiH, SESAM and IMSH provide annual discourse regarding the evolution of medical simulation theory and best practices. Courses like iSim provide hands-on training in clinical educator facilitation and debriefing.

The tools exist to provide the required training mentioned above but the real need now is the acknowledgement by administrators that this professional development and training is a necessary requirement to operating a medical simulation program!

Read the full SUPER article on Informa Healthcare here!