Watch: Gardaí Simulate Terror Attack at Dublin’s Docklands

Watch: Gardaí test response to terror attack in simulation at Dublin's Docklands

The Irish-based Gardai engaged with a counter-terrorism exercise in Dublin recently to test their response in the event of a mass casualty terrorist attack. The simulation, codenamed ’Sciath’, involved a number of actors at the Docklands railway station in Dublin’s north inner city and the garda units involved today had not been told ahead of time what would be involved.

Does your simulation program work with local Civil Service Groups to provide simulated training opportunities? The promotional opportunities to develop new business opportunities and showcase your simulation program are clearly evident!


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As part of the simulation, the men inside acted out assaulting a number of people inside the station. Armed officers used stun grenades and blank rounds, shooting one of the suspects and securing the scene. “Today has demonstrated the professionalism and the capability that we have,” Garda Commissioner Nóirín O’Sullivan told reporters after the training exercise was finished. “Incidents like this can happen. We have to make sure that we are ready to respond to those incidents. In the last few days we have given instructions to all of our members and I think we wanted to see how those instructions would work,” she said.

The Commissioner said simulations such as today’s operation are prioritised in high density areas like Dublin city, but she said further exercises will take place in other parts of the country to test response times outside the capital.


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EMSWorld Interviews Moulage Concepts Founder Bobbie Merica About Simulation Realism Through Makeup

EMSWorld recently interviewed Moulage expert Bobbie Merica of MoulageConcepts.com to learn how moulage makeup can improve the educational outcomes of simulation by increasing the realism for learners. Here are a couple of excerpts from the EMSWorld article entitled The Importance of Accuracy in Moulage Trainingby Valeria Amato:

What advice would you give people who are looking to implement more realistic and effective moulage into training regimens?

It’s like anything else: You need to plan and prepare. When you develop your case scenarios, decide what the takeaway is going to be. Is it triage-specific? If so, then your wounds should accurately represent wounds related to triage. A lot of the time, people will throw in the moulage piece at the end without giving it any thought. They won’t collectively decide what the full-thickness burn is going to look like, what the pediatric patient will look like and how they’re going to present it. Locate an accurate picture on the Internet of an actual case. Practice creating moulage so that everyone in your training knows what these wounds will look like.

Mostly it’s about the planning. You’d never run your training scenarios without a great deal of planning. When you’re building those scenarios, start building in those moulage components. Understand what story you want to tell. Understand what the training outcome is. Is intubation with a full-thickness burn the outcome, or is it identifying the smoke inhalation? If the training outcome is smoke inhalation, then you don’t need a full-thickness burn. It’s not difficult to clarify that a full-thickness burn in the upper airway in the chest and neck has smoke inhalation. If you really want to know if someone has smoke inhalation, bring it back and test it in multiple areas. Create that eye-reddening, some tears coming down, the reddening in the back of the throat. That little bit of hoarseness. Break it out into multiple training avenues, unless intubating the patient with a full-thickness burn is the skill set.

That makes sense, especially going back to what you said about using moulage in less of a theatrical capacity and for mass-casualty incidents.

If it’s a mass-casualty incident, you’re going to have some people who look like those first-line-of-response people, but often a lot of those people look the same. Certainly you should assess the woman screaming and covered in blood, but you might also want to look at that person quietly dying right next to her. It’s about creating all those aspects and using this as a tool to define where those strengths are and, more important, where those weaknesses are so you know how to align future training dollars.

I think every person, every entity and every training site should have access to this level of training. Moulage doesn’t have to be expensive and time-consuming. You can have amazing moulage that tells the whole story, allowing you to spend the next six weeks accurately training your participants to meet outcomes, that will cost you pennies.

Do you have a copy of Bobbie’s Best Selling Moulage Recipe Book? Check out our review here!

Regional EMS Cadet Competition Utilizes Simulation For Recognition of Leading Students

South Orange Rescue Squad Cadets Bring Home Gold

Shouldnt all EMS programs utilize simulation for demonstration and training to new recruits on the lessons of first responding? Village Green NJ recently reported how last Saturday the South Orange Rescue Squad won the 5th Annual Bayshore EMS Cadet Competition in Keyport, New Jersey at the Keyport First Aid Squad. What a great way to utilize simulations to encourage healthcare professionals of tomorrow!

This event brought Emergency Medical Services cadet teams from New York and New Jersey together for a two day event that combines EMS skill competitions, educational experiences, training, and socializing with like-minded peers. Many volunteer ambulance squads across the state have cadet programs where teenagers train alongside adult members to provide emergency medical care to their community. Explained South Orange Rescue Squad President Troy Balog, “these cadet groups are valuable feeder programs to help critical volunteer shortages in squads.”

He added, “we’ve had our cadet program for three years and many former cadets are now active adult members, including our current 1st Lieutenant! We are all volunteer, do not charge for our services and exist on donations, so people who give so much of their time are highly valued.” Competing against 35 other cadet teams, the South Orange Rescue Squad team won both first place in the “Advanced Team” category as well as the “Grand Champion” award for highest all around score. This is the first time the South Orange squad has entered the competition. “I wasn’t sure what to expect.” said team member EMT Cole Fitzsimmons, “we train a lot at South Orange so I felt that we were ready for it.”

Cadet teams could enter the “Basic” level competition or the “Advanced” level. Basic teams consisted of CPR or first aid trained cadets and were evaluated in stations consisting of Vital Sign, CPR, and bleeding control. The “Advanced” teams had to have at least two Emergency Medical Technicians and their three stations consisted of a simulated fall down to flights of stairs with two broken legs, a Heart Attack/Cardiac Arrest simulation, and a serious car accident where two critical patients were entrapped in the vehicle. “For the car accident station we had to work with the fire department to use the Jaws of Life to remove doors from the vehicle,” shared EMT team member Victor Rothstein. The victims in each of the scenarios were either role played by a volunteer with medical make-up or a high-tech simulator mannequin. Cadets were evaluated in each station by Paramedics, EMT Instructors, or Physicians who provided detailed feedback to the teens after each test.


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Canadian First: Mobile Air Ambulance Simulator from Alberta Health Services

air ambulance simulator

“Alberta’s new air ambulance simulator is a Canadian first”,
says Rob Csernyik of the Edmonton Journal!

Have you ever seen anything like this? A mobile, motion air ambulance simulator to help medics train under realistic air conditions! Sadly we can’t embed the video so be sure to visit the website through the link below to see it in

On Thursday, Alberta Health Services unveiled a Canadian first — a mobile air ambulance simulator that will be used for training medics. The 12-metre simulation trailer, developed in-house by Alberta Health Services and partners, allows hands-on medical simulations to be run in the fuselage of a King Air 200 aircraft.

Because the fuselage, donated by Lakeland College, is on hydraulics, takeoffs and landings are simulated for medics. Before, they could only experience arrivals and departures in the air. Brent Thorkelson said the biggest challenge for AHS was that it was unchartered territory. “I’ve designed and built three ground simulators,” said the Emergency Medical Services staff development officer and project lead. “I’ve done nothing like this.”

The $739,000 mobile simulator went from conception to reality in approximately 13 months and was funded by a Government of Alberta grant. Health Minister Sarah Hoffman said the government is proud to support the innovative new approach to training. “This new EMS flight simulator will give air ambulance paramedics critical hands-on experience in providing emergency patient care in an aircraft,” she said. “Because this simulator is designed to travel, this true-to-life training experience will be available to paramedics right across the province.”

Approximately 225 Emergency Medical Services air ambulance paramedics at the 10 air ambulance bases across the province will be trained using the mobile simulator.

Check out the video of the new Air Ambulance Simulator on the Edmonton Journal website!

iSimulate Sponsors Award of 2017 Recipient of Street Medicine Society Award

JEMS and PennWell Corporation Announce the 2017 Recipient of John P. Pryor, MD/ Street Medicine Society Award

Last week Jeremy T. Cushman, MD, MS, EMT-P, was awarded the 2017 John P. Pryor, MD/Street Medicine Society Award at the EMS Today conference in Salt Lake City, UT which was sponsored by iSimulate. ohn P. Pryor, MD, FACS, an EMS physician, was killed on Dec. 25, 2008, while serving in Iraq. Dr. Pryor posthumously received the first award in his name at the 2009 EMS Today Conference. Each year the SMS awards a physician who has come up through the ranks as an EMS provider and constantly demonstrates a sincere and ongoing dedication to the betterment of EMS through clinical excellence or educational, logistical and/or humanitarian initiatives.

The award, sponsored by iSimulate, recognizes Dr. Cushman’s exemplary service to the field of emergency medicine and, specifically, emergency medical services (EMS). In 2006 Dr. Cushman became the medical director for the Gates Fire District in New York. Today he represents almost 30 fire and 10 ambulance agencies in a county with a population of 750,000 people. JEMS (Journal of Emergency Medical Services) seeks to improve patient care in the prehospital setting and promote positive change in EMS by delivering information and education from industry leaders, change makers and emerging voices. Dr. Cushman has been instrumental in developing, coordinating and implementing many programs and policies for his agencies over the last 10 years, including:

  • First responder naloxone procedure and delivery;
  • The Check & Inject New York project, which has saved millions of dollars across the state by having EMS use syringes to deliver epinephrine;
  • A county-wide firefighter rehabilitation and safety program; and
  • A program for influenza and Ebola preparedness that allows for an appropriate response without exposing responders to unnecessary risk.

Additionally, Dr. Cushman revised the Gates Fire Districts’ Quality Assurance and Quality Inspection program for patient care reports, creating a real-time process that provides valuable education to EMTs and assisted the 9-1-1 center with the emergency medical dispatch coding program to ensure responses optimize patient outcome.

Founded in July 1995, the mission of the Street Medicine Society (SMS) is to provide an informal forum for the growing group of physicians who got their start as EMS professionals, providing inspiration and expertise for the industry and to serve as advocates and mentors for the modern EMS professional.

ABOUT iSimulate
iSimulate uses the best of current mobile technology to create products that are more advanced, simpler to use, and more cost effective than traditional medical simulation solutions. iSimulate recently launched some of our favorite new products from IMSH 2017 which you can learn more about here! Learn more about iSimulate here.


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Stimulating Simulation 2-Day EMS Simulation Workshop March 13 & 14 – Ventura, CA

stimulating simulation workshop

“Stimulating Simulation”
A 2-day class on EMS Simulation Techniques
March 13 and 14, 2017: 0800 – 1700

Hosted by
SCCRC Deputy Sector Navigator – Health Workforce Initiative &
Ventura College EMS Program at Ventura College
4667 Telegraph Road, Ventura, CA 93003

This interactive two-day course for EMS, Nursing and Allied Health Faculty, Educators, and Preceptors will expand your knowledge about best practices in healthcare simulation.  Participants will leave the course with the fundamental knowledge to better implement simulation activities into their programs.

Participants are encouraged to bring an existing simulation activity/scenario with them to the course.

Objectives: Upon completion of this two-day program the learner will be able to:

  • Provide an overview of the fundamentals of simulation scenario design;
  • Identify simulation modalities and their use within simulation scenario design;
  • Describe the importance of simulation realism and how to achieve it for EMS simulation;
  • Practice applying the fundamentals required for evidence based simulation activities;
  • Describe debriefing techniques.

*Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #13152 for 12.5 contact hours,College of the Canyons Nursing Program

 

FACILITATORS

Jennifer McCarthy – Paramedic Science Program Director and Associate Professor
Bergen Community College and Fairleigh Dickinson University

Jennifer McCarthy MAS, NRP, MICP CHSE serves as the founding member, Associate Professor and Director of the Paramedic Science Program at Bergen Community College in Lyndhurst, NJ. As the founding member, she designed a 5,000 square foot emergency medicine laboratory and a 6,000 square foot Inter-professional simulation center.  Her daily responsibilities include strategic leadership of the Paramedic Science Program, faculty member for the curriculum and competency assessment of overall student learning.  In addition, Jennifer is the simulation task force co-chairperson for the health profession division leading efforts to improve IPE simulation initiatives and advancement of science based medical simulation activities within the division which includes 10 health profession programs.  Jennifer is national presenter at both EMS and medical simulation conferences presenting about innovative topics.  She has a passion about the use of medical simulation to advance learning and use to formalize education practice within the EMS profession. She has won numerous teaching excellence awards and serves on several state and national committees that address the advancement of EMS and medical simulation. Most notably Jennifer has received recognition for the EMS Career Lifetime Achievement presented by the New Jersey Department of Health Office of Emergency Medical Services and the New Jersey EMS Council.

Andrew Spain, M.A., NCEE, EMT-P – Director of Accreditation and Certification
Society for Simulation in Healthcare

Andrew Spain is the Director of Accreditation and Certification for the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.  He came to SSH in November of 2010 first as the Manager of Certification, and then later became the Director of Certification, and has since been made the Director of Accreditation as well.  He is a Nationally Certified EMS Educator, and also is a currently licensed Paramedic in the State of Missouri.

Andrew received a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Northern Colorado in 1990.  He discovered Prehospital Medicine during this time while working at Ben Delatour Scout Ranch in Red Feather Lakes, CO.  He became an EMT in 1991, and then a Paramedic in 1992.  He first worked in Littleton, CO with Columbine Ambulance, subsequently moving to Columbia, MO in 1994.  He worked as a Paramedic and Flight Paramedic with the University of Missouri Health Care, and eventually became the Manager of the EMS Education program for this Level 1 Trauma Center, a position he held for five years prior to coming to SSH.

Andrew has been active in many areas of EMS, including with the MO State Time Critical Diagnosis Initiative, various committees for EMS, and also working with the Missouri Hospital Association to set up a National Disaster Life Support (NDLS) Regional Training Entity.  He continues to teach disaster response and preparedness courses, and also continues in clinical care at Mid-Mo Ambulance District.  He has presented at a number of national/international EMS conferences, and even was on the winning team for the National EMS Trivia Competition in 2010.

Register here for this awesome simulation workshop in California!

SimulationIQ IPE Provides Case-Based Virtual Patient Training For Healthcare Teams

ipe learning system online

Did you know that half of the suggested 440,000 deaths attributed to medical error are communication related? By providing healthcare students and professionals with more ways to study case based simulations, online, in their own time, together — is certainly a must have for every healthcare organization. What attracts me to this learning system is that multiple learning participants can participate on a case scenario which follows a patient over time, letting educators see communication between IPE over a longer period of time, even ongoing!

Enter SIMULATIONiQ IPE. Education Management Solutions, providers of SimulationIQ, now provide this case-based virtual patient IPE solution replicates different disciplines working together on a common case using an innovative technology platform. The IPE solution can be used to augment existing IPE programs and allow your faculty to operate at maximum efficiency, so that instructors can focus on what they do best: educate.

 

Breakdown in Communication

SIMULATIONiQ IPE provides full visibility of case, actions, treatment plan across all professions to facilitate cross-discipline communication.

  • Role-based practice simulation
  • Integrated chat and discussion forum functions

Misdiagnosis

To avoid misdiagnosis, SIMULATIONiQ IPE offers visibility to diagnosis and care plan across disciplines to facilitate shared decision making.  This integrated team approach is facilitated by:

  • An interactive team-based question solution
  • Robust communication options including – voice conferencing, screen sharing, chat and discussion forums
  • Simulation scenario sessions to augment online or traditional courses

Coordination of Care

To improve coordination of care it provides immediate feedback to actions and orders that inform and allow for better coordination of the patient care team.

  • Real-time lab and discussion results
  • Total visibility to all facets of patient care
  • Assessment of best practice care knowledge through team and role-based questions
  • Reflective debrief to develop critical thinking skills

Learn more at the SimulationIQ IPE Website!


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Homeland Security Simulation Center Offers Realistic Training for Disaster Preparedness

response simulation for ems and ed

Utilizing a newly designed self-built simulator, Concordia’s Center for Homeland Security Studies, provides students with a way to learn disaster response scenarios. Learners deal with real world changing environment which includes traffic, wind conditions, fire movement and more.

Excerpt from Disaster Management:

The simulation center, part of Concordia’s Center for Homeland Security Studies, offers specific training on disaster preparedness and response for the university’s students and for outside groups. The centerpiece is the Advanced Disaster Management Simulator virtual reality platform.

During an exercise, the simulator allows first responders to progress through a scene using avatars. Others are down the hall at a command post, receiving information through a computer feed and being interviewed periodically by actors pretending to be reporters.

This strategic messaging piece is critical, said Cliff Gyves, director of the Homeland Security Simulation Center. “We give them a sense of information chaos through our fake newscasts,” he said. “The kids all have phones. You can tell them not to post, but they will, and it’s going to get picked up by the regular media.”

Clients from the local area as well as other states have used the simulator, often at the end of a one- or two-day training session. Although schools wanting to simulate their response to an active shooter are frequent clients, other scenarios involve situations such as a disaster at a large construction site, or a biohazard. The center has a mobile version of the lab that can do smaller simulations too.

“We can take a client’s existing plan, develop a scenario around that, and have them run through the simulation to recognize any gaps,” said Scott Winegar, director of Concordia’s Center for Homeland Security Studies. They can then modify the plan to correct the problems and do a final exercise to see if the modifications worked.

The simulator, which has been operational for about six months, took several months to develop and install. It is currently being used on average at least once a week. For most services that include a simulation — normally formal classroom training with a capstone simulation — the rate is $2,000 for four hours and $3,500 for a full eight-hour day, Gyves said.

Read the full article on the Emergency Management website!

Action Training Provides Video Recording Services for EMS/Fire Fighter Training Departments

video recording training fire department

Is your EMS or Fire Fighter department seeking video production services for your training program? Then you have to check out the awesome team from Action Training Systems! Action Training Systems’ focus is providing superior training programs for emergency responders in both the private and public sector. They started out with linear programs on VHS as companion products to written manuals and have branched out to include Online interactive courses, streaming video and DVDs. Providing training programs at all levels makes them effective at program delivery regardless of your training style or needs. Check out this example below for safety procedures:

The above video is Fireghter Safety: Part I. This Essentials of Fire Fighting series presents an overview of fire department and firefighter responsibilities under NFPA 1500. Describes the Incident Command System, control zones at emergency response scenes and how to meet the physical demands of the job through fitness and wellness programs. I wish we had more videos like these during my fire academy!

Learning Opportunities From the Action Training Website:

We offer over 200 Fire and EMS training programs. Our programs are designed to be used as instructor resources in and out of the classroom. Each course thoroughly covers a distinct set of learning objectives with high quality visual examples. For example our EMT training series has 27 titles, each of the videos run between 17 and 28 minutes, short enough to hold learners attention, but also long enough to cover necessary information. Interactive courses take approximately 1 hour to complete. The courses contain the same video content as the DVD but also include interactive questions, chapter quizzes and final exams.

Learn more about Action Training System on their website,
and be sure to tell them HealthySimulation.com sent you!

Syndaver Showcases Synthetic Cadaver and EMS SimulationIQ Partnership at IMSH 2016

syndaver recording simulationiq

In this video interview from the IMSH 2016 exhibit hall, we learn more about a new partnership between Syndaver and EMS SimulationIQ to increase the learning opportunities for those that are educating healthcare learners with synthetic cadavers. Watch this exclusive HealthySimulation.com video interview from the trade show floor to learn more about Syndaver’s Anatomy Model and this new A/V recording / statistics capturing partnership with EMS SimulationIQ:

About the New Partnership:

During the three-day conference the two companies will demonstrate what they believe to be the most medically accurate and comprehensive medical training simulation system built to date. This system will utilize a combination of SynDaver’s flagship Synthetic Patient model and EMS’s SIMULATIONiQ operating platform.

The SynDaver Synthetic Human is the most life-like synthetic human mannequin ever created, while EMS’s SIMULATIONiQ platform provides software and equipment that drives the entire simulation process and provides feedback, debriefings and audio and visual playbacks.

“We are excited to form this partnership with SynDaver Labs,” said Anurag Singh, CEO of EMS. “By integrating with these mannequins, SIMULATIONiQ customers are able to analyze and assess data over time, enabling our customers to better track the progression of learning.”

By forming this partnership, SynDaver Labs and EMS hope to establish a new standard for medical simulation training systems and better prepare students in the healthcare industry for real-world medical emergencies and patient-care protocols.

“We are constantly looking for ways to provide better products to our clients, and this new partnership with EMS will allow us to do exactly that,” said Dr. Christopher Sakezles, President and founder of SynDaver Labs. “We are thrilled to begin demonstrating the SIMULATIONiQ platform in conjunction with our Synthetic Human at IMSH, and know this is a step in the right direction for the medical education industry as a whole.”

Learn more about Syndaver and EMS SimulationIQ!