Immersive Media Initiative Uses VR to Train Healthcare Students

Immersive Media Initiative uses virtual reality to train medical students

Almost weekly now, healthcare educational programs around the world are receiving grants and other financial support to explore the use of VR in healthcare education and training. Check out this recent article from the POST and an almost $1M grant to fund such research at Ohio University:

Alexa Hoynacke, a senior studying industrial systems engineering, plays a virtual reality game that involves touching targets as a part of the LEARNING study in Grover Center on November 5, 2015. Along with entertainment, virtual reality can also be used for healthcare purposes. With new virtual reality simulations, medical students can practice procedures and gain confidence in their craft faster. Since receiving an $878,000 grant from Ohio University’s Innovation Strategy program, the Immersive Media Initiative team was able to begin work on a handful of virtual reality projects — they have tackled filmmaking and enhanced journalism, and they have also been busy with multiple VR projects in the medical field.

Last summer, the Immersive Media Initiative shot 360-degree footage of emergency room patients. This was their first project in virtual reality healthcare. Eric Williams, associate professor of media arts and studies and co-creator of Immersive Media Initiative, consulted with Dr. Thanh Nguyn since he is in charge of training six medical students every semester. Williams said, “Here’s the technology we have, how can we help you train your interns better.” Williams said virtual reality lets you “go and and watch the same trauma bay procedure and figure out how everything works.” Medical students can benefit from using virtual reality as part of their training because traditional methods do not allow for as



Since receiving an $878,000 grant from Ohio University’s Innovation Strategy program, the Immersive Media Initiative team was able to begin work on a handful of virtual reality projects — they have tackled filmmaking and enhanced journalism, and they have also been busy with multiple VR projects in the medical field.

much access to bodies. There is only a limited supply of cadavers to work on, and the E.R. can receive an unsteady stream of new patients.

“Virtual reality not only makes it to feel like a person but makes it look like a person,” Fredricks said.


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Is This The Reason Healthcare Simulation Isn’t Main Stream?

clinical simulation in nursing

Key Nursing Educators have spoken against the use of simulation for a very bizarre reason. In the latest “Clinical Simulation in Nursing” Journal December 2016 Volume 12, Issue 12, INACSL Journal Editor Suzan “Suzie” Kardong-Edgren explains a major misunderstanding about the use of healthcare simulation.

In the edition, Suzie provides a powerful reminder about the challenges faced for simulation in nursing education, and “what simulation is and how it is evolving”. In my opinion, the laggards of simulation technology adoption will cite any and every reason to reject modern advances in educational practices as the scapegoat for systematic failures. Another must-read commentary by one of our community’s most influential thought leaders entitled “High Fidelity Educators” which you can read here:

“A recent Researchgate citation alert led me to a most interesting editorial by Dean, Williams, and Balnaves (2016) entitled Living dolls and nurses without empathy. The lack of general understanding about what simulation is and how it is evolving, demonstrated in the editorial, provided fodder for thoughtful commentaries from many in the simulation community. This evolving commentary can be found in the blog section of the Journal of Advanced Nursing. It is well worth a read.

It remains very clear that a segment of the nursing education community does not understand that simulation is not about the manikin. However, learner deficits identified during simulation can be easily scapegoated because of the use of simulation. The upshot of the Dean et al. editorial is that nursing students are demonstrating less empathy and that the use of plastic dolls contributes to this. I contend a noted lack of empathy is not new (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010) but that we can clearly see it now during simulation.

Part of the skill set required of a simulation educator is choosing the right kind of simulation (standardized patient, manikin, or task trainer) to accomplish a learning outcome. It is probably not ideal to have a learning outcome of empathy embedded in a manikin-based simulation, but it is certainly possible. Many of us have seen student learners crying at the end of a manikin-based scenario.

Simulation has allowed us to more clearly identify those students who might lean toward a less empathic nature. I might not have noticed a lack of student empathy with a real patient in the past because I, as the faculty member, was there, beside the student and interacting empathetically with a patient, whether the student was capable of doing so or not. In reality, we know our students’ skills and abilities much better after a simulation than we know their abilities within the clinical setting. I became a much more astute educator after seeing my verbally skilled students say some unbelievable things to patients, during simulation.

Working in simulation, one becomes a high-fidelity educator. Admittedly, manikins provide only partial fidelity. The facilitator sets the scene, the mood, observes, diagnoses, and debriefs the scenario. If fidelity is defined as the “degree of accuracy to which a simulation, whether it is physical, mental, or both, represents a given frame of reality in terms of cues and stimuli, and permissible action” (Tun, Alinier, Tang, & Kneebone, 2015 p. 164), it is the educator (facilitator) who orchestrates this fidelity and brings it home, during the debriefing. Students missing opportunities to develop or demonstrate empathetic communication skills can be debriefed in a simulation setting and can try it again, preparing for real patients and families. Arguably, the best clinical educators today are those who work in both simulation and the clinical setting. They are true high-fidelity educators.”

Featured Articles in This Edition:

  • Utilization of the Simulation Environment to Practice Teach-Back With Kidney Transplant Patients – Kara Mangold
  • Acting With a Purpose: The Lived Experience of Actors in the Role of Standardized Patients Portraying Mental Illness – Judith M. Jarosinski, Debra A. Webster
  • Generalizability Theory: An Introduction With Application to Simulation Evaluation – Susan K. Prion, Gregory E. Gilbert, Katie A. Haerling
  • Nursing and Social Work Trauma Simulation: Exploring an Interprofessional Approach – Sara J. Manning, David M. Skiff, Lizette P. Santiago, Andrew Irish
  • Logistical Planning and Making the Move to a New Simulation Space – Jan Barber, Ashley Eberhardt, Brooklyn Kennedy, Suzie Kardong-Edgren
  • Making Sense of Methods and Measurement: Lawshe’s Content Validity Index – Gregory E. Gilbert, Susan Prion

Read the latest edition on the Clinical Simulation in Nursing Website!

3D Digital Continuity is the Future of Healthcare Education

3-D Digital Continuity Is the Future of Human Health

Sim champions it won’t be long before the entire healthcare industry is surronded by 3D Animation! We already know that designing and testing devices using 3D physical simulation is a key part of developing a commercial product. Slowly we are convincing the world that simulating and testing healthcare providers will become a key part of developing a more effictive healthcare system. Imagine watching in real-time, the human patient’s case as it developed — in 3D on the wall during diagnosis. With faster computers like IBM’s Watson — its only a matter of time! Check out the use of animation from a recent Medical Device Summit:

Steve Levine reports on The Living Heart Project which enables realistic simulation. At a time when the industry is facing some of its toughest challenges, more than 200 regulators, engineers, and healthcare leaders came together in Chicago at the American Medical Device (AMD) Summit in October, to discuss the state of the medical device industry and focus on opportunities to accelerate innovation, with increased predictability and profitability. From a regulatory, patient and payer perspective, medical device business models are changing, creating an environment that has rendered sustainable innovation elusive for many medical device companies seeking to grow their top line as well as bottom line.

These shifts in the marketplace are pressuring the balancing act between corporate efficiency, time to market, and predictable patient outcomes. It has raised an essential question for the future of the medical device industry—how to restructure to remain competitive and compliant while simultaneously meeting the needs of the patient, provider, and enterprise? The healthcare industry is finding answers in an unlikely place, by turning to a resource traditionally associated with more traditional manufacturing industries such as automotive and aerospace.


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Latest Simulation in Healthcare Journal Article List from SSH

medical simulation research journal

The most recent Simulation in Healthcare Journal (October 2016 – Volume 11 – Issue 5
pp: 301-364) from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare has been posted online! This month’s journal provides a tribute to the “godfather” of medical simulation Dr. Gaba, and an exploration of new simulation technologies to improve healthcare learning outcomes:

  • Tribute to David Gaba on the Occasion of His Retiring as Editor-in-Chief of Simulation in Healthcare Cooper, Jeffrey B.; Issenberg, Barry S.; DeVita, Michael A.; Glavin, Ronnie
  • Comparison of 4 Laryngoscopes in 2 Difficult Airway Scenarios: A Randomized Crossover Simulation-Based Study Altun, Demet; Ozkan-Seyhan, Tulay; Orhan-Sungur, Mukadder; Sivrikoz, Nukhet; Camci, Emre
  • Mastery Learning of Video Laryngoscopy Using the Glidescope in the Emergency Department Ahn, James; Yashar, Michael D.; Novack, Jared; Davidson, Joey; Lapin, Brittany; Ocampo, Jose; Wang, Ernest
  • Preparation With Web-Based Observational Practice Improves Efficiency of Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Cheung, Jeffrey J.H.; Koh, Jansen; Brett, Clare; Bägli, Darius J.; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam
  • How Do Simulated Error Experiences Impact Attitudes Related to Error Prevention? Breitkreuz, Karen R.; Dougal, Renae L.; Wright, Melanie C.
  • Coaching From the Sidelines: Examining the Impact of Teledebriefing in Simulation-Based Training Ahmed, Rami A.; Atkinson, Steven Scott; Gable, Brad; Yee, Jennifer; Gardner, Aimee K.
  • The Role of Ultrasound Simulation in Obstetrics and Gynecology Training: A UK Trainees’ Perspective Patel, Hersha; Chandrasekaran, Dhivya; Myriokefalitaki, Eva; Gebeh, Alpha; Jones, Kate; Jeve, Yadava B; Midlands
  • Research Collaborative in Obstetrics & Gynecology Simulation for Operational Readiness in a New Freestanding Emergency Department: Strategy and Tactics Kerner, Robert L. Jr.; Gallo, Kathleen; Cassara, Michael; D’Angelo, John; Egan, Anthony; Simmons, John Galbraith
  • An Approach to Confederate Training Within the Context of Simulation-Based Research Adler, Mark D.; Overly, Frank L.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Davidson, Jennifer; Gottesman, Ronald; Bank, Ilana; Marohn, Kimberly; Sudikoff, Stephanie; Grant, Vincent J.; Cheng, Adam;
  • For the International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators Highlighting Instructional Design Features in Reporting Guidelines for Health Care Simulation Research Cheng, Adam; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Chang, Todd P.; Auerbach, Marc

SSH Members can read the latest journal edition here!

Peak TV Show Covers St. Luke’s University Health Network Simulation Medical School

simulation center interview

Medical simulation helps bridge the gap between classroom learning and real-life hands on experience for medical students. Joining us in the studio is Dr. Joel Rosenfeld, Chief Academic Officer for Temple University Medical School at St. Luke’s.

The PEAK is the Greater Lehigh Valley’s PREMIER lifestyle show featuring the latest medical news, personal fitness, healthy cooking and eating, exciting places and trends, and giving back in our community! If it’s innovative, informative, and fun — you’ll find it on The PEAK!

About St. Luke’s Simulation Center

State-of-the-art clinical simulation centers, located at both the Philadelphia North Broad Street and the Bethlehem St. Luke’s campuses, provide students with outstanding opportunities to develop their clinical and procedural skills. These centers include both robotic simulators and standardized patients as well as a variety of procedural skills training equipment. High fidelity, programmable robotic simulators imitate physiologic and clinical scenarios that clinicians may encounter. Small groups of students work together to assess the “patient’s” problem and to develop and implement a management plan.

A faculty member observes the group, then debriefs the students about the encounter to develop their skills for future encounters with patients. Students develop their history-taking and physical examination skills and professional behaviors through sessions with standardized patients and patient instructors. The opportunity to work first with standardized patients (who simulate real medical cases) helps to build students’ confidence towards the time when they will encounter real patients. Life-like task trainers (arms, head/neck, torsos, and other portions of the body) allow students to build their skills in performing a range of procedures such as phlebotomy, airway management, suturing, and urinary catheterization.

Students interested in surgery may begin to develop basic surgical skills during their preclinical years by participating in surgical interest groups and electives.

Learn How to Gain Media Attention for Your Sim Lab!

Esper Augmented Reality Trainer from 3D4Medical Will Change the Way We Learn Anatomy

augmented reality virtual learning anatomy

3D4Medical Labs makes award-winning medical and fitness software. Their applications are used daily by education and clinical organizations around the globe. They have over 12 million downloads, numerous prestigious awards, and appearances on stage at major industry events. Their anatomical models are the most detailed available on consumer devices, which they build by studying real anatomical structures, and combining them with world-class medical knowledge.

Straight from the 3D4Medical Lab, discover how you will interact with the anatomy using augmented and mixed reality with their new Project Esper. Take a look at the future of medical learning with the video above about this world-class education tool that utterly transforms the way people learn about the human body.

Learn more on the 3D4Medical Labs website!

INACSL’s Latest Simulation in Nursing Journal Highlights Standardized Patients

nursing simulation journal

Suzie Kardong-Edgren, Director of the RISE Center at Robert Morris University, Drexel Faculty member, and INACSL Simulation in Nursing Journal editor recently shared “Standardized Patients have been a part of health professional education for over 50 years now. As an educational field that continues to grow in scholarship and practice, the editors of Clinical Simulation in Nursing feel the time is right to dedicate a special issue to examining ongoing contributions, share best practices and honour debates within the live simulation field relevant to its practitioners and health professional educators more broadly.”

INACL invites health professionals who are engaging standardized patients (SPs) in simulation education to submit manuscripts for a special issue to be published in July 2017.

Nancy McNaughton, M.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Director, Standardized Patient Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto and Mindi Anderson, PhD, ARNP, CPNP-PC, CNE, CHSE-A, ANEF, University of Central Florida College of Nursing will serve as the guest editors for this special issue.

When submitting manuscripts for this special issue, please select “special issue” when the choices appear.

Clinical Simulation in Nursing is the flagship journal of the International Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning. The journal provides a forum for research, innovation, review, and debate in simulation. The journal is dedicated to the advancement of simulation as an educational strategy to improve patient care. A double blind peer-review process is used for all submissions.

Manuscripts for consideration should be submitted to Clinical Simulation in Nursing (www.nursingsimulation.org) by 15 February, 2017.

California Simulation Alliance Fall Calendar of Events

california simulation alliance

Hey Sim Champs – The CSA has shared their upcoming summer/fall schedule of courses, conferences and more! Check out the upcoming activities below.

2nd Annual CSA/USF Simulation Conference: “Making an Impact on Healthcare Education: Bridging the Gap Using Simulation”

October 13-15, 2016

All three courses are held at the University of San Francisco. Why not make a weekend of it and enjoy the city? We are securing a hotel block, which will be announced soon, at a discounted rate.

October 13: CHSE and CHSOS readiness review classes. Sponsored by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.

October 14: Special pre-conference debriefing workshop featuring Dr. Jenny Rudolph and Dr. Mary Fey! The Center for Medical Simulation at Harvard and the CSA are co-sponsoring this exciting pre-conference.

October 15: Simulation Conference: “Making an Impact on Healthcare Education: Bridging the Gap Using Simulation” Keynote speaker: Dr. Jenny Rudolph

2016 CSA Course Calendar

Simulation Evaluation: 2016
August 5, 2016
Location: University of San Francisco, Fromm Hall
Cost: $350
Course Description: In this seminar, learners will review current best practices for assessment and evaluation of simulation activities with special consideration for reliable and valid tools available in the literature. A thorough grounding in feedback, assessment and evaluation theory and practice will be provided, with opportunities for discussion and application to simulation practice.

Simulation Intensive
August 11-13, 2016
Location: Cal Baptist University, Riverside, CA
Cost: $1250 CSA subscribers; $1500 nonsubscribers
19.5 CEUs

Advanced Debriefing
August 22, 2016
Location: Sacramento State University
Cost: $300 CSA subscribers, $350 nonsubscribers
6.5 CEUs

Special Pre-Conference: Debriefing Workshop, Featuring Drs. Jenny Rudolph and Mary Fey
Sponsored by CSA and CMS
October 14, 2016
Location: University of San Francisco, McLaren Hall
Cost: $499 CSA subscribers; $550 nonsubscribers

2nd Annual Simulation Conference: “Making an Impact on Healthcare Education: Bridging the Gap Using Simulation”
Sponsored by CSA and USF Keynote Speaker: Dr. Jenny Rudolph
October 15, 2016
Location: University of San Francisco

Simulation Intensive
October 20, 21, & 22, 2016
Cal State University San Marcos, San Marcos, CA
Cost: $1250 CSA subscribers; $1500 nonsubscribers
19.5 CEUs

Learn more and Register on the CSA website today!

Microsoft Improves Healthcare Education with Launch of HoloLens Augmented Reality Glasses

hololens

Have you heard about the release of the Hololens from Microsoft yet? This oculus-like device will enable healthcare educators with a plethora of new tools to educate learners with the latest in virtual and augmented reality programs. Navigate anatomy, workspaces, and educational programs in 3d spaces. Track motion and spatial mapping to better learn how learners interact with learning programs. Watch this Microsoft demonstration by School of Medicine Dean Pamela Davis who shows how using holograms to teach anatomy dramatically enhances and accelerates learning:

About Microsoft HoloLens:

Microsoft HoloLens is the first fully untethered holographic computer running Windows 10. It is completely untethered–no wires, phones, or connection to a PC needed. Microsoft HoloLens allows you to place holograms in your physical environment and provides a new way to see your world.

Microsoft HoloLens generates a multi-dimensional image visible to a user so that he or she perceives holographic objects in the physical world. Holographic objects seen with Microsoft HoloLens can be placed in physical locations you choose, move according to their own rules, or remain in a specific location regardless of where you are or in which direction you are looking.

The holograms you’ll see with Microsoft HoloLens can appear life-like, and can move, be shaped, and change according to interaction with you or the physical environment in which they are visible. Use gestures to create, shape, and size holograms. Use your gaze to navigate and explore. Use your voice to communicate with your apps. Microsoft HoloLens understands your movements, gaze, and voice, enabling you to interact with content and information naturally. Using holograms, you can place your digital content, such as apps, information, and even multi-dimensional videos, in the physical space around you, so you can interact with it.

Learn more on the Microsoft HoloLens website!

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality (MMVR22) Launches in Los Angeles

mmvr 22

Today at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles the 22nd annual Medicine Meets Virtual Reality meeting launched to an international audience. HealthySim is on hand to provide updates throughout the day on our @HealthySim twitter account – and stay tuned tomorrow for a blog post covering more activities from the event. For now, learn more about MMVR below:

About MMVR

In 1992, Medicine Meets Virtual Reality first presented a daring vision of patient care and medical education transformed by computer technology. The evolving NextMed / MMVR engages researchers committed to intelligent healthcare—engineers, physicians, scientists, educators, students, industry, military, and futurists—with its creative mix of unorthodox thinking and validated investigation. Conference topics include:

    • Medical simulation and modeling
    • Data visualization and fusion
    • Virtual and augmented reality
    • Imaging devices and methods
    • Robotics, haptics, sensors
    • Human-computer interfaces
    • Data and decision networks, AI, mobile health
    • Wearable and implantable electronics
    • Projection systems
    • Learning and technology
    • Simulator design and validation
    • Physical and mental rehabilitation tools
    • Serious games
    • Surgical registration and navigation
    • Peri-operative guidance
    • Remote and battlefield care
    • Patient and public health monitoring and education

NextMed / MMVR promotes the creation and adoption of IT-enabled tools for patient care and medical education that support better precision, efficiency, and outcomes. The curriculum combines traditional assessment methods with unorthodox problem-solving to stimulate forward-thinking solutions to healthcare problems. Presentations are chosen to educate participants on:

    • Advances in simulation, modeling, and haptics that are upgrading medical education, skills  training, psychotherapy, and physical rehabilitation
    • Novel imaging, visualization, and data fusion methods that make clinical diagnosis and therapy more precise and personalized
    • Robotics and sensors that extend the caregiver’s reach and provide richer patient data
    • Medical intelligence networks that promote a collaborative healthcare environment and enhance decision-making
    • Broader goals, accomplishments, and challenges in the development and application of emerging healthcare technologies

Learn more at the Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Website!