Teaching Patient Handoffs to Medical Students in OB/GYN: Simulation Curriculum and Assessment Tool

mededportal simulation

MedEdPortal, a division of AAMC, just released this healthcare simulation curriculum and assessment tool for those teaching patient handoffs to medical students in OB/GYN. You must be a subscriber to the website to get the full toolkit.

Abstract


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Patient handoffs, the communications required for the safe transfer of patient care, are known to be a common source of medical errors. Simulation exercises are effective techniques for teaching the procedures and patient interaction skills involved in a handoff. We developed a teaching tool that allows students to individually interact with a simulated patient, develop a treatment plan, and practice a handoff to another provider. The curriculum is a flexible instructional tool to teach patient handoffs in the context of a simulated obstetric emergency for learners at the clerkship through first-year obstetrics and gynecology resident levels. The curriculum secondarily teaches management of first-trimester bleeding with acute blood loss and can be adapted to allow advanced learners to practice obtaining informed consent.

To evaluate this simulation for educational effectiveness, we developed a faculty observation assessment tool. The simulation assessments for history taking, fund of knowledge, and interpersonal skills were predictive of subsequent clerkship clinical grades. Eighty percent of students agreed the exercise was realistic, 95% agreed it was relevant to the clinical curriculum, 90% agreed the simulation taught handoff skills, and 73% agreed the simulation increased confidence in handoff skills. Students uniformly found the curriculum to be relevant, realistic, and effective at teaching handoff skills. Use of this curriculum has the potential to improve students’ communication skills, handoff performance, and confidence during an obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. The assessment tool may allow early identification of students in need of improvement in communication skills.

Read the full article and get the toolset here on MedEdPortal!


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Implementing Curriculum Using Simulation To Augment Pediatric Emergency Medicine Rotation

ped simulation research curriculum

Shared by our friends at B-Line Medical this Med Ed Online article “Development and assessment of a pediatric emergency medicine simulation and skills rotation: meeting the demands of a large pediatric clerkship” by Elaine K. Fielder and colleagues can help us expand simulation into our programs.

Objective: To implement a curriculum using simulation and skills training to augment a Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) rotation within a pediatric clerkship.

Background: PEM faculty are often challenged with a high learner to teacher ratio in a chaotic clinical setting. This challenge was heightened when our pediatric clerkship’s traditional 1-week PEM rotation (consisting of 4 students completing four 8-hour ED shifts/week) expanded to 8 students every 2 weeks. We sought to meet this challenge by integrating simulation-based education into the rotation.

Methods: Clerkship students from March to June 2012 completed our traditional rotation. Students between July and October 2012 completed the new PEM-SIM curriculum with 19 hours ED shifts/week and 16 hours/week of simulation/skills training. Pre/post-tests evaluated 1) medical management/procedural comfort (five-point Likert scale); and 2) PEM knowledge (15 multiple-choice questions).

Results: One hundred and nine students completed the study (48 traditional, 61 PEM-SIM). Improvement in comfort was significantly higher for the PEM-SIM group than the traditional group for 6 of 8 (75%) medical management items (p<0.05) and 3 of 7 (43%) procedures, including fracture splinting, lumbar puncture, and abscess incision/drainage (p<0.05). PEM-SIM students had significantly more improvement in mean knowledge compared to the traditional group (p<0.001).

Conclusions: We have successfully integrated 16 hours/week of faculty-facilitated simulation-based education into a PEM rotation within our clerkship. This curriculum is beneficial in clinical settings with high learner to teacher ratios and when patient care experiences alone are insufficient for all students to meet rotation objectives.

Read the full article on Med Ed Online!