3D-Printed Hearts — A Training Tool for Canadian Surgeons via Norfolk News

3d printed heart

Interesting article today out of Canada and the Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, which is working with 3D printing technology to help with clinical education:

About a dozen trainees — from Canada and such countries as Norway, Oman, Mexico and the United States — have come to watch master surgeons demonstrate the highly complicated techniques used to repair a number of congenital heart abnormalities and to safely practise those skills on models of their own. Three-dimensional copies have been created of five hearts from real infants with cardiac anomalies using a high-tech 3D-printer, which almost perfectly reproduces the organ’s structure using a photopolymer resin, based on sophisticated MRI and CT imaging.

“Each of the models represents a very specific form of disease that is very different,” says Dr. Glen Van Arsdell, chief of cardiovascular surgery at Sick Kids. “I can look at the model and tell you what the diagnosis is.” The 3D-printed hearts — some orange, others whitish in colour — were produced by Dr. Shi-Joon Yoo, a cardiac radiologist at the hospital.



Depending on its size, a duplicate of a child’s heart can take anywhere from four to 12 hours to produce, as layer upon layer of the resin is built up, he says. While the current cost is somewhat prohibitive – estimated at about $2,000 per model — Yoo says the technology means hundreds of copies can be printed after imaging a single child’s heart to demonstrate a particular defect.

“Anybody can practise on the same structure, so that is the real value of that.” Van Arsdell says the trainees have come to Toronto to learn procedures that would typically take years to learn by watching and assisting senior surgeons before they would be allowed to perform the operation on their own. For some, such expertise isn’t available in their home countries.

Read the full article on the Norfolk News website!


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Featured Job Posting: Simulation Education Specialist at Arizona St. Joseph’s Hospital

simulation job

Looking for a new position in medical simulation? Today we have a featured job posting from Dignity Health out of Arizona which is a featured position from our medical simulation jobs listing page!

Simulation Education Specialist:

At St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, part of Dignity Health, we provide a wide range of health, social and support services in the heart of Phoenix, Arizona. In addition to being a nationally recognized center for quality tertiary care, medical education and research, we’re consistently named an outstanding place to work. What’s more, AZ Business Magazine recognizes us as one of Arizona’s Most Admired Companies. So if you’re ready to join a healthcare organization that’s respected both locally and nationally, pursue the following opportunity:

In this position, you’ll help design and implement simulator-based educational/training activities to improve the overall performance of personnel providing medical care. This will involve developing simulated scenarios, troubleshooting operating systems and equipment, and identifying, implementing and managing hardware, software and multimedia resources that will enhance the operations of our simulation center. Bring your unique talents to our tight-knit team, and make a big impact on our future and yours.

Qualifications:

  • A bachelor’s degree in a relevant field
  • 5 years of professional experience related to medicine, nursing and/or emergency response

Preferred qualifications:

  • A master’s degree in a relevant field
  • Certification in simulation education
  • Current AZ RN licensure
  • Experience with AV simulation and scenario development software
  • Experience operating task trainers as well as low- and high-fidelity simulations/mannequins

We offer a competitive salary and a generous benefits package that includes comprehensive medical and dental plans, matched 403b retirement and pension plans, and much more. You also may be eligible for an incentive plan after your first year of service.

For more information, visit us at www.dignityhealth.org/stjosephs or contact Jackie Schierenberg at Jackie.Schierenberg@DignityHealth.org.

Learn more and apply directly here!

Clinical Skills Lab Coordinator Standard Operating Procedures Example

healthcare simulation lab coordinator policies

Recently I shared the Standard Operating Guide developed at the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas for both the IT and Clinical Simulation Technology Specialists. Today, I am sharing the “SOPs” for the position of Skills Lab Coordinator, who was responsible for:

  • Managing supplies for the entire center including
    • Inventory
    • Stocking
    • Location
    • Barcoding
    • Ordering
    • Checkout
    • Disbursement
  • Coordinating with faculty regarding skills lab setups/tear-downs
  • Managing volunteers and student workers
  • Skills labs signups
  • Setting up and taking down lab setups for
    • Ward
    • Two skills labs
    • Classrooms
  • Task trainer maintenance, tracking and storage
  • “Other duties as assigned”

These SOPs act as a guide with regards to the responsibilities breakdown of the position and were developed to help new staff better understand the position as well as help demonstrate policies and procedures to clinical faculty. As a former director of a healthcare simulation space, I highly recommend you have all current staff create such an SOP document in-order to easier deal with staff rotation, as well as annual reviews of job performance and HR salary increases.

Download the Clinical Skills Labs Coordinator Standard Operating Procedure

Then check out the Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists Standard Operating Procedures


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Bridging The Gap Between Clinical and Non-Clinical Simulation Technicians

Educating Non-Clinical Sim Techs in Need to Know PathophysiologyWritten By Guest Author Simulation Technician Lisa Schwaberow

training sim techs

The field of Simulation in the medical community is an exciting and fulfilling way to make a living. For those that are clinical it is a way to pass on what they know to others. For the non-clinical Sim Techs, it is a way to give back to the community. Assisting with the training of medical professionals who will save a life is very rewarding. In a way, the non-clinical person is helping save lives by helping others learn what they know. How gratifying it is to know that as a Sim Tech you are saving lives, and making a difference in this world. Being a Sim Tech is not just a 9-5 job, where you bring home a paycheck each week. The paycheck is a bonus. A Sim Tech, clinical or non-clinical is a very gratifying career.

There is a division in the field of Simulation Technology. There are Sim Techs that are clinical and Sim Techs that are not clinical. A Simulation center cannot exist without either of these roles. A clinical person will struggle with how the software works, or what to do when something goes wrong with the technology that is a big part of the simulation experience.  On the other hand the Sim Tech who is great with running the situation, they struggle with when to raise or lower the blood pressure in certain scenarios, or creating scenarios for clients that are medically accurate. They are both vitally important to one another.

Yes, a non-clinical Sim Tech can learn the terminology, reactions and pathophysiology of the human body. But if you are hiring a fairly new non-clinical Sim Tech don’t expect them to learn the terminology, the medicine effects, the circulation systems and all that Simulation entails, in a few months. Remember a clinical Sim Tech has been immersed in this knowledge for years. Be patient with the non-clinical Sim Tech, teach them what they need to know, help them in their journey to being a medical Sim Tech that can be a valuable part of the team. Chances are the non-clinical Sim Tech has an interest in medicine or they wouldn’t have gravitated towards this field.

If you are a non-clinical Sim Tech you may be asking what you can do to learn more about the pathophysiology of the human body. Hopefully you work in an environment that is supportive of your desire to learn. If you are not that fortunate, there are many apps for the ipad/iphone for assisting with this process. Here are several that are useful:

Resuscitation
Here is an app that is great if you like to have fun while learning. This app is not a game but has some game like qualities. The app has quite a few cases. It involves a patient that has been admitted to the hospital and you must diagnose and treat them. You can choose to let the app give you a random case or you can choose the specific case you would like to test your skills on. There are cases for Emergency Medicine, Neurology, Gynecology, EMS Paramedic, Labor and Delivery, and Pediatrics. The starting screen is your patient lying on a hospital bed.  You then decide what to do next. You can read the history of the patient, and their symptoms. You then choose to hook up the patient monitor, start an IV, give a nasal cannula, run tests, and order consults. After you feel you have all the information you need you then put in a diagnosis. If you ran the tests that were necessary, and consulted the specialists, made a diagnosis and put it in, then you are ranked….it is very exciting to rank above student! This is a great way to practice what is being taught in the simulation classes.

GFlash+
If you like to learn by memorization then this app might be appealing to you. It is the old fashion way of having index cards and flipping them, in a new high tech way. The beauty of this app is that you can create your own stack of cards or you can download sets that others have created. Most all of them are at little to no cost. Here is a screen shot of just a few of the stacks that are available.

clinical education for technicians

ACLS Megacodes – AHA Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support

This app is questions about ACLS. There are AHA Megacodes you “run”, choosing what you would do and it goes to the next question.  This app also has the ACLS Provider Manual, but you must purchase each module at $2.99. Another nice feature is the ACLS Calculators, everything from Glasgow Coma Scale to Unit Conversions. The useful calculators are included in the app and include 21 different modules. ACLS Flash cards are also included in this app. These are broken down into groups such as Bradycardia, Tachycardia, Cardiac Arrest and more, at no additional cost.

mega codes for sim tech training

Looking for a great Sim Tech? Lisa is looking to bring her technical experience to a new Sim Lab program so contact Lisa Schwaberow on LinkedIn!