Regional EMS Cadet Competition Utilizes Simulation For Recognition of Leading Students

South Orange Rescue Squad Cadets Bring Home Gold

Shouldnt all EMS programs utilize simulation for demonstration and training to new recruits on the lessons of first responding? Village Green NJ recently reported how last Saturday the South Orange Rescue Squad won the 5th Annual Bayshore EMS Cadet Competition in Keyport, New Jersey at the Keyport First Aid Squad. What a great way to utilize simulations to encourage healthcare professionals of tomorrow!

This event brought Emergency Medical Services cadet teams from New York and New Jersey together for a two day event that combines EMS skill competitions, educational experiences, training, and socializing with like-minded peers. Many volunteer ambulance squads across the state have cadet programs where teenagers train alongside adult members to provide emergency medical care to their community. Explained South Orange Rescue Squad President Troy Balog, “these cadet groups are valuable feeder programs to help critical volunteer shortages in squads.”


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He added, “we’ve had our cadet program for three years and many former cadets are now active adult members, including our current 1st Lieutenant! We are all volunteer, do not charge for our services and exist on donations, so people who give so much of their time are highly valued.” Competing against 35 other cadet teams, the South Orange Rescue Squad team won both first place in the “Advanced Team” category as well as the “Grand Champion” award for highest all around score. This is the first time the South Orange squad has entered the competition. “I wasn’t sure what to expect.” said team member EMT Cole Fitzsimmons, “we train a lot at South Orange so I felt that we were ready for it.”

Cadet teams could enter the “Basic” level competition or the “Advanced” level. Basic teams consisted of CPR or first aid trained cadets and were evaluated in stations consisting of Vital Sign, CPR, and bleeding control. The “Advanced” teams had to have at least two Emergency Medical Technicians and their three stations consisted of a simulated fall down to flights of stairs with two broken legs, a Heart Attack/Cardiac Arrest simulation, and a serious car accident where two critical patients were entrapped in the vehicle. “For the car accident station we had to work with the fire department to use the Jaws of Life to remove doors from the vehicle,” shared EMT team member Victor Rothstein. The victims in each of the scenarios were either role played by a volunteer with medical make-up or a high-tech simulator mannequin. Cadets were evaluated in each station by Paramedics, EMT Instructors, or Physicians who provided detailed feedback to the teens after each test.


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