First Ever Research Specific to Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists Published This Month in SSH Journal

sim tech research

Just received word from Sim Tech Rachel Bailey that the first ever research article about Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists (Simulation Technicians) has been published in the latest edition of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. “Defining the Simulation Technician Role: Results of a Survey-Based Study” was written by Rachel Bailey. Regina Taylor MA, CCRP, CPM, Michael FitzGerald PhD, Benjamin Kerrey MD, MS,Thomas LeMaster MSN, MEd and Gary Geis MD. You will need to be an SSH member to read the full article online, but the highlights are shared below:

Abstract

Introduction: In health care simulation, simulation technicians perform multiple tasks to support various educational offerings. Technician responsibilities and the tasks that accompany them seem to vary between centers. The objectives were to identify the range and frequency of tasks that technicians perform and to determine if there is a correspondence between what technicians do and what they feel their responsibilities should be. We hypothesized that there is a core set of responsibilities and tasks for the technician position regardless of background, experience, and type of simulation center.

Methods: We conducted a prospective, survey-based study of individuals currently functioning in a simulation technician role in a simulation center. This survey was designed internally and piloted within 3 academic simulation centers. Potential respondents were identified through a national mailing list, and the survey was distributed electronically during a 3-week period.



Results: A survey request was sent to 280 potential participants, 136 (49%) responded, and 73 met inclusion criteria. Five core tasks were identified as follows: equipment setup and breakdown, programming scenarios into software, operation of software during simulation, audiovisual support for courses, and on-site simulator maintenance. Independent of background before they were hired, technicians felt unprepared for their role once taking the position. Formal training was identified as a need; however, the majority of technicians felt experience over time was the main contributor toward developing knowledge and skills within their role.

Conclusions: This study represents a first step in defining the technician role within simulation-based education and supports the need for the development of a formal job description to allow recruitment, development, and certification.

Congrats to Rachel and the team this is fantastic work!

Read the Full Sim Tech Research Article on the Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare Website


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INACSL Research Advisor Seeks Support for Facilitator Competency Rubric

rubric for simulation facilitators

Kim Leighton PhD, MSN, Assistant Dean, Research and Simulation Faculty Development DeVry Medical International and Research Advisor for the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning is looking for some assistance with upcoming research:

As many of you are aware, we have been working to develop a Facilitator Competency Rubric for simulation facilitators. Even before the NCSBN study results, we knew that we needed to have competent facilitators but have had no way to measure that competency! The tool has been developed over the past two years with a lot of input from audiences at simulation conferences and we are now collecting data for the psychometric analysis. We are hoping to finish this part of the study over the summer but find that we need more data collection sites. Does your school have simulation learning opportunities for undergraduate nursing students over the summer? Would you be interested in participating? If so, please contact me at kleighton@devry.edu for additional information! Our IRB only covers US schools for this study; however, if you are located outside the US and are interested, please let me know as that will be the next study!

Contact information: Kim Leighton; 402-617-1401; kleighton@devry.edu. Look forward to hearing from you!

Joint Commission Journal Publishes “Eight Critical Factors in Creating and Implementing a Successful Simulation Program”

Recently the The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety published an article by Elizabeth H. Lazzara, PhD; Lauren E. Benishek; Aaron S. Dietz, MA; Eduardo Salas, PhD; David J. Adriansen, EdD, NREMT entitled “Eight Critical Factors in Creating and Implementing a Successful Simulation Program under their Teamwork and Communication series.  The article, available for free online, provides numerous tips for the eight key topic areas suggested as necessary to create a successful medical simulation program.

medical simulation success factors

Article-at-a-Glance:

Background: Recognizing the need to minimize human error and adverse events, clinicians, researchers, administrators, and educators have strived to enhance clinicians’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes through training. Given the risks inherent in learning new skills or advancing underdeveloped skills on actual patients, simulation-based training (SBT) has become an invaluable tool across the medical education spectrum. The large simulation, training, and learning literature was used to provide a synthesized yet innovative and “memorable” heuristic of the important facets of simulation program creation and implementation, as represented by eight critical “S” factors—science, staff, supplies, space, support, systems, success, and sustainability. These critical factors advance earlier work that primarily focused on the science of SBT success, to also include more practical, perhaps even seemingly obvious but significantly challenging components of SBT, such as resources, space, and supplies.

Systems: One of the eight critical factors—systems—refers to the need to match fidelity requirements to training needs and ensure that technological infrastructure is in place. The type of learning objectives that the training is intended to address should determine these requirements. For example, some simulators emphasize physical fidelity to enable clinicians to practice technical and nontechnical skills in a safe environment that mirrors real-world conditions. Such simulators are most appropriate when trainees are learning how to use specific equipment or conduct specific procedures.

Conclusion: The eight factors—science, staff, supplies, space, support, systems, success, and sustainability—represent a synthesis of the most critical elements necessary for successful simulation programs. The order of the factors does not represent a deliberate prioritization or sequence, and the factors’ relative importance may change as the program evolves.

Read the entire Eight Critical Factors in Creating and Implementing a Successful Simulation Program Article here!


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Research Article: Using Simulation to Develop Handover Skills

simulation hand over research

Here’s a free-access article (shared by Nicole Jones De Rooy’s Scoop.it) on how to use Simulation to develop handover skills for healthcare students! “A simulation of patient handovers in a safe environment can help student nurses to develop the skills and confidence needed to carry out this process effectively”.

Learn From This Article:

  • Why effective handovers are important
  • An audit of students’ experience of handing over
  • How a simulation experience was introduced

Author Guy Collins, senior lecturer at the University of Derby.

Abstract Using simulation to develop handover skills. Nursing Times; 110: 8, 12-14.

This article outlines the potential impact of ineffective handover skills on nurses’ confidence, competence and coordination, as well as on patient safety.
It focuses on how student nurses can develop their communication skills by looking specifically at how the University of Derby used simulation to teach pre-registration student nurses effective handover techniques.

5 Key Points:

  1. Ineffective handover can compromise patient safety
  2. Developing communication skills is a key domain of pre-registration nurse training standards
  3. Some student nurses are unsure what constitutes an effective handover or lack the confidence to deliver one
  4. The SBAR approach to handovers helps professionals to structure the information given
  5. Practising handovers in a safe environment helps build students’ knowledge and confidence

Visit NursingTimes.net to read the full article!

Simulation in Healthcare Education: A Best Evidence Practical Guide

medical simulation management

Dr. Barry Issenberg, Director of the Gordon Medical Simulation Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and co-author of AMEE Guide #82 “Simulation in Healthcare Education: A Best Evidence Practical Guide PART-2″ reminds us here of the importance of considering the practical implementation of medical simulation. While Part-1 focused on simulation program development and operations, part-2 focuses on clinical educators and getting ROI on learning outcomes. Think of these articles as a great “How To Get Started” guide to medical simulation!

Simulation in Healthcare Education: A Best Evidence Practical Guide Part -2 Abstract:

Over the past two decades, there has been an exponential and enthusiastic adoption of simulation in healthcare education internationally. Medicine has learned much from professions that have established programs in simulation for training, such as aviation, the military and space exploration. Increased demands on training hours, limited patient encounters, and a focus on patient safety have led to a new paradigm of education in healthcare that increasingly involves technology and innovative ways to provide a standardized curriculum. A robust body of literature is growing, seeking to answer the question of how best to use simulation in healthcare education. Building on the groundwork of the Best Evidence in Medical Education (BEME) Guide on the features of simulators that lead to effective learning, this current Guide provides practical guidance to aid educators in effectively using simulation for training. It is a selective review to describe best practices and illustrative case studies.

This Guide is the second part of a two-part AMEE Guide on simulation in healthcare education. The first Guide focuses on building a simulation program, and discusses more operational topics such as types of simulators, simulation center structure and set-up, fidelity management, and scenario engineering, as well as faculty preparation. This Guide will focus on the educational principles that lead to effective learning, and include topics such as feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, and curriculum integration – all central to simulation efficacy. The important subjects of mastery learning, range of difficulty, capturing clinical variation, and individualized learning are also examined. Finally, we discuss approaches to team training and suggest future directions. Each section follows a framework of background and definition, its importance to effective use of simulation, practical points with examples, and challenges generally encountered. Simulation-based healthcare education has great potential for use throughout the healthcare education continuum, from undergraduate to continuing education. It can also be used to train a variety of healthcare providers in different disciplines from novices to experts. This Guide aims to equip healthcare educators with the tools to use this learning modality to its full capability.

To download part-2 of the FREE article visit here. Part-1 is located here.


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