Jump Trading Simulation Program Explores Collaborative Relationship with U.S. Air Force

osf innovation u.s. air force

Jump Simulation, hosts of the 2016 SimGHOSTS USA conference, announced recently that they are actively seeking training opportunities with the U.S Air Force. Such partnerships are crucial for the success of your program, and the field of simulation as a whole!

The reputation of Jump Simulation, a part of OSF Innovation, as being a leader in health care education and training is beginning to expand outside of the medical industry. The facility on the campus of OSF Saint Francis Medical Center recently hosted Brigadier General Lee Payne, the Surgeon General for Air Mobility Command (AMC). AMC is responsible for airlift, air refueling, and all aeromedical evacuation (aka life flight) for the U.S. Air Force. General Payne is the equivalent of a Chief Medical Officer for a health care system as large as OSF HealthCare.

He’s responsible for 12 locations around the world in providing medical benefits and coverage for active duty members, their families and retirees—amounting to about 450,000 people. He oversees more than one billion dollars’ worth of assets and an operating budget worth hundreds of millions of dollars. In addition to delivering superior health care every day, Gen Payne is also responsible for ensuring his teams are able to deploy in a moment’s notice anywhere around the world – often to very challenging post-natural disaster environments General Payne and his team, based out of Scott Air Force Base in southern Illinois, requested to visit Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center to see the space, meet the staff behind the innovative work taking place and explore ways the two organizations might collaborate in the future.


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“Areas we are looking to explore right now include inviting them to our simulation facilitator course, “ said Don Halpin, Health Care Systems Engineering and Sociotech Innovation Program Manager for Jump Simulation. “They would like to see how we run our sims and how we debrief our learners in the simulation environment. In turn, they are inviting us out to see their simulation system in the Air Force and what they do to get ready for people to deploy to austere environments.”

Overall, Halpin says his hope is that Air Mobility Command and Jump Simulation can work together in the future to solve health care problems and improve care for patients.

Learn more about Jump and OSF Healthcare here!


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Featured Job Listing: FT Medical Simulator Operator at Wright Patterson Air Force Base Ohio

medical simulation air force civilian job

Lots of new featured medical simulation jobs this week! Engenium is currently seeking a Simulator Operator to assist with medical simulation training for the United States Air Force Medical Service (AFMS). This full-time position is located at Wright Patterson AFB near Dayton, OH. Simulator Operators have the responsibility for the operation of simulation equipment and help with coordinating and integrating organizational training initiatives.

Responsibilities

  • Operates and maintains task trainers, mannequin-based, and surgical simulators, as well as other computerized simulators
  • Operates virtual reality procedural trainers, and associated supplies and equipment
  • Operates simulation equipment with the ability to follow medical aspects of training scenarios and make appropriate adjustments based on participant actions
  • Operates audio-video recording systems
  • Set up simulation lab with supplies and equipment to meet assigned training site objectives
  • Provides feedback and recommendations to Course Director and Medical Facility staff on training equipment needs to effectively carry out training objectives
  • Oversees all simulation encounters to include after action reports (AAR) of simulation training
  • Provides weekly activity reports to the Central Program Office and other reports as required
  • Works with a broad array of stakeholders to contribute to the development of educationally sound simulation curriculum (e.g., scenarios) as needed

Basic Qualifications

Required

  • Associates degree or technical certification in a computer technology field (e.g. hardware, networking, helpdesk, etc.), or 5+ years of professional clinical experience
  • 3+ years of experience in the civilian or military medical field
  • 3+ years of experience with the operation of human patient simulation equipment

Preferred

  • Paramedic equivalent medical knowledge
  • Military experience, particularly military medical experience
  • Understanding of caring for and transporting trauma patients
  • Working knowledge of the organizational functions and training requirements of Air Force Medical Treatment Facilities
  • Experience as any technical course instructor/teacher

Professional Skills

  • Excellent written and oral communications skills, attention to detail, strong organizational skills, computer proficiency, and the ability to work under strict deadlines in a fast-paced environment
  • Knowledge of course development and education methodology for working with adult learners in a military environment
  • Strong analytical, problem-solving and decision-making capabilities
  • Proficiency in MS Office applications (Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Excel)

Interested applicants should directly contact Jason Irving at Engenium

ICF International Provides Medical Simulation Strategies to U.S. Military

icf medical simulation

Since 2007, ICF International has partnered with the U.S. Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) in providing support to the Air Force Medical Modeling and Simulation Training program, a system-wide network designed to deliver leading-edge basic medical education and continuing training to all medical personnel. ICF provided assistance in developing the hub and spoke organizational network that formed the basis for information sharing and lessons learned. ICF’s 2007 baseline assessment of simulation staff and equipment for 80 Military Treatment Facilities and 5 affiliated university-based Level 1 Trauma Centers assisted in developing an initial gap analysis and follow-on equipment procurement strategy.

ICF has continued to provide program management and operations support to Air Force and civilian-affiliated simulation centers, assistance in identifying and tracking performance metrics, and validation research on effectiveness and new technology development. ICF tackled the challenge of incorporating standard taxonomies and classifications for simulation-based training operations across the AFMS and implemented the use of a standard curriculum development process, a broad set of simulation training templates, and full-array of associated learning evaluation tools.

icf healthcare simulation

From the ICF Website:

“The training of medical personnel is critical to saving lives. New learning strategies and technologies are being introduced to the medical community with the intent of ensuring that medical personnel are well-prepared to face ever-increasing challenges—whether at home or on the battlefield.

ICF brings the knowledge and expertise to its clients with:

  • Systems Approach—based on proven instructional strategies and integrated with advanced training technologies
  • Sound Instructional Approach—combined with the right technological solution to achieve top performance when practicing medical procedures
  • Leveraged Research—to advance state-of-the-art medical simulation and training technology, including exploration of simulation-based gaming technologies and advancement of authenticity in medical simulations

ICF’s approach begins with an analysis of training and performance requirements and adheres to the proven principles of instructional systems design. We bring specific learning objectives, learning activities, performance assessment, and feedback in order for learning to take place.

Our design and development efforts are driven by the learning requirements as well as the customer needs and any constraints (such as financial or schedule). Once we have developed the training, we evaluate the effectiveness of the training in terms of achievement of desired results. We are solution-neutral and focused only on achieving the desired results.

ICF uses an interdisciplinary team comprised of instructional systems designers, performance technologists, medical experts, and technical experts in simulation technology, all focused on delivering performance improvement. By staying abreast of advancements in methodology and technology, we leverage those advancements to deliver state-of-the-art solutions. Through modeling and simulation, we conduct research in virtual environments and apply innovative applications of these promising approaches to training tasks.”

Learn more about:


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USAF Utilizes Simulation to Train Past Budget Cuts

us air force

From DefenseNews.com:

If one thing has become clear under sequestration, it is this: Budget cuts beget training cuts, which in turn hurt readiness. The US Air Force in particular has been impacted, with large swaths of its fleet grounded last year and unable to fly crucial training missions. Under that budget reality, the service — and the rest of the Pentagon — is focusing on simulation as a low-cost training alternative, a move made possible by improved technology.

That mix is a “perfect storm” of new technologies, financial need and new capabilities coming online throughout the Pentagon, according to Air Force Col. Franz Plescha, commander of the Air Force Agency for Modeling and Simulation.

“There is a huge upswing,” he said. “We’ve kind of turned the corner. People have had this vision for years, and now it’s all coming together that this is definitely the future.”

Sequestration was “a straw on the camel’s back,” but Plescha said it is unfair to argue that budget cuts forced a move to more simulation. Doing so argues that “we can’t afford to do it a better way, therefore we’re going to do this. And that’s the wrong perception to have. It may have been one of the reasons that got us to turn the corner, but by no means is it the only reason.”

Baptiste said he sees the simulation business expanding in the coming years.

“The current budget environment is going to cause all of the services to relook at the balance of live and simulated training,” he said.” The amount you dedicate to each is going to start to move closer together.” But is there a saturation point for the training market? “I would say the only limitations we have is our own imagination,” Baptiste said. “There will never be zero requirement for training.”

The different services are all committed to simulation, but Baptiste highlighted distributed mission operations — networked simulators — as one area in which the Air Force is advanced.

Linking simulators for joint training operations has been going on for over a decade, according to Plescha. What has changed, he said, is the ability to integrate simulation and live training. Simulation works best when realism is necessary, according to Cummings, who points to situations such as mechanical work or driving a large ship as appropriate. It’s also useful for training people on collaborative decision-making processes, such as squad training, that require audio or gestural queues during the training.

“The thing that you need to think about when thinking of simulation is, ‘what kind of perceptual feedback are you getting when using a simulator?’ ” he said. “Sometimes it’s very important to have very realistic feedback when you’re making decisions.”

The military, of course, isn’t just platforms. New uses for simulation and mobile training are infiltrating everything from training security patrols and joint terminal attack controllers to finding new ways of helping post-traumatic stress disorder sufferers. In some cases, the military can borrow heavily from the civilian side, including in the medical realm, where doctoral students are learning how to identify diseases and dissect patients without needing a cadaver. It also creates new market potential for companies interested in this kind of training.

“Much of the Air Force focus you’ll find in medical,” Golson said. “Medical will explode, absolutely explode. There is a big push right now for all things medical simulation.”

“Still,” Plescha said, “too often when we speak about [simula­tion], people revert to simulators. Virtuals can be not just simulators. It can be the medical dummy that’s on a table. And I’d rather have a doctor practice on a dummy than me.”

Read the full article on DefenseNews.com!

AFMMAST @ IMSH

Military Healthcare Simulation

The Air Force Medical Modeling and Simulation Training team was on-hand in the Military Expo at IMSH this year to let attendees know about their mission: to build a distributed human patient simulation network, create simulation centers of excellence, and exploit technological innovation.  I spoke with LtCol (ret) Shae Peters from AFMMAST who helped explain the benefits of simulation for professional healthcare providers.

Much like rural hospitals which can sometimes have difficulty training healthcare professionals due to infrequency of patient events, AFMMAST has found ways to incorporate simulation to expand the training potential of Air Force Medical professionals.  What is especially important to note is how AFMMAST utilized simulation to help expand training efforts even with a shrinking budget across global regions .

For more information about AFMMAST, check out the AFMMAST website as well as the video below!


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