Stratasys 3D Printers Create Realistic Medical Training Models | IMSH 2017 Video Interview

healthcare simulation 3d printers

Continuing our coverage of IMSH 2017 exhibits, today HealthySim shares an interview with Stratasys to learn more about their innovative 3D printer technologies which provide realistic medical models. Using multiple printer heads allows Stratasys customers to print a variety of 3d models with different plastics, creating vibrant products with flexible components. Watch our video interview below to see the printer in action!

Applications Within Medicine for Stratasys 3D printed Models:

Medical Device Prototyping: Get to market faster with clinically meaningful and marketable products. Use 3D printing solutions to rapidly produce prototypes with the shape, texture, and material properties of any medical device. Validate device performance on patient-derived 3D printed anatomical models versus existing models such as animals and cadavers. Based on real patient imaging, 3D printed models mimic a variety of tissue properties in a single print. Stratasys Medical 3D Printing Solutions can help you accelerate product development from 3D printed concept models to preclinical testing allowing manufacturers to gain certainty, test anywhere, and mitigate cost overruns.



Education and Training: 3D printed multi-material models can replicate the complexity and wide range of patient pathology, making them superior tools for medical education. But how do 3D printed models compare to traditional training methods? Conduct clinically relevant training anywhere on realistic anatomical models customized for virtually any clinical scenario. Provide a memorable, hands-on experience with customized models that represent specific pathologies and mimic human tissue and bone. Multi-material 3D medical printing creates accurate, versatile models in less time and at a fraction of the cost.

Surgical Planning Models: Optimize surgical planning with spatially, tactilely, and physically accurate models based on patient scans. Surgical teams can use the 3D printed models to plan therapeutic approaches, and make more efficient use of expensive operating room time. Advance medical outcomes one patient at a time. By creating patient-specific models on demand, surgeons can better prepare for procedures and operate with greater efficiency and confidence.

Learn more on the Stratasys Medical Page today!

 


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Mount Sinai Unveils Medical Modeling Core: Will Provide Virtual Reality, Simulation, and 3D Printing Services

Mount Sinai Unveils Medical Modeling Core: Will Provide Virtual Reality, Simulation, and 3D Printing Services

Both 3ders.org and 3Dprint.org covered the recent launch of the Medical Modeling Core which will “provide virtual reality, simulation, and 3D printing services, with quick turnaround times, on a low-cost, fee-for-service basis.”

The wonders of 3D printing in the medical field are far-reaching. You can create better spinal care , make a wide variety of prosthetics , or even 3D print amazing, origami-inspired self-folding medical implants . New York’s Mount Sinai Health System is certainly no stranger to 3D printing : the hospital’s chief of pathology and laboratory medicine recently worked with 3D printed bone material . Yesterday, they announced the creation of their new Medical Modeling Core, where clinicians can confer and order 3D prints for their cases. Led by the Department of Neurosurgery , this collaboration will provide virtual reality, simulation, and 3D printing services, with quick turnaround times, on a low-cost, fee-for-service basis.

This resource is the first of its kind, catering to the patient-specific 3D modeling requirements for the Mount Sinai clinicians. The simulation, prototyping, and 3D printing resources developed at Mount Sinai are pretty rare for a medical institution. The 3D printed models will be used in the planning stages for minimally invasive approaches, and can also be used in a surgery trial run. They will also be invaluable during the patient consultation process. 

“We’re unique because we can leverage our technological tools with the expertise of radiology and the printing lab to complete projects on a rapid time scale,” said Dr. Costa. “We’re talking about days as opposed to weeks. Mount Sinai is a large institution with a high volume of cases and our patients will benefit from 3D modeling.”

Read the full 3Ders Article here and the 3DPrint Article here!

3D-Printed Hearts — A Training Tool for Canadian Surgeons via Norfolk News

3d printed heart

Interesting article today out of Canada and the Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, which is working with 3D printing technology to help with clinical education:

About a dozen trainees — from Canada and such countries as Norway, Oman, Mexico and the United States — have come to watch master surgeons demonstrate the highly complicated techniques used to repair a number of congenital heart abnormalities and to safely practise those skills on models of their own. Three-dimensional copies have been created of five hearts from real infants with cardiac anomalies using a high-tech 3D-printer, which almost perfectly reproduces the organ’s structure using a photopolymer resin, based on sophisticated MRI and CT imaging.

“Each of the models represents a very specific form of disease that is very different,” says Dr. Glen Van Arsdell, chief of cardiovascular surgery at Sick Kids. “I can look at the model and tell you what the diagnosis is.” The 3D-printed hearts — some orange, others whitish in colour — were produced by Dr. Shi-Joon Yoo, a cardiac radiologist at the hospital.

Depending on its size, a duplicate of a child’s heart can take anywhere from four to 12 hours to produce, as layer upon layer of the resin is built up, he says. While the current cost is somewhat prohibitive – estimated at about $2,000 per model — Yoo says the technology means hundreds of copies can be printed after imaging a single child’s heart to demonstrate a particular defect.

“Anybody can practise on the same structure, so that is the real value of that.” Van Arsdell says the trainees have come to Toronto to learn procedures that would typically take years to learn by watching and assisting senior surgeons before they would be allowed to perform the operation on their own. For some, such expertise isn’t available in their home countries.

Read the full article on the Norfolk News website!


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