Healthcare IT: Patient Safety, Engagement Relies on Crafting a Culture of Change

patient safety improvements through IT

What role does IT play in the improvement of patient safety? This article from Health IT Analytics helps to spread some light on the culture of change that will be needed to improve healthcare engagement outcomes:

Health IT Analytics Article Excerpt:

“Improving patient safety is primarily a matter of responsibility, says Dr. James Merlino, President and Chief Medical Officer of the Strategic Consulting Division of Press Ganey.  Healthcare organizations must take on the challenge of creating a “culture of care” that encompasses every member of the care team – including patients.

By broadcasting bold patient safety goals, engaging providers, and enacting patient-centric strategies for process improvement, healthcare organizations have the opportunity to make meaningful progress in the fight to reduce preventable patient harm.


Sponsored Advertisement:


“Organizations really need to adapt a strategic objective of patient centricity,” Merlino toldHealthITAnalytics.  “They have to get across to everyone that works in healthcare that they exist for the patient, and that their purpose is to deliver on the promises that they implicitly make with their patients: providing a safe, high-quality, human environment where the patient feels cared for.”

To do this, organizational leaders have to be sure that their staff members are not only educated about patient safety risks, but fully committed to eliminating preventable harm all together. “You must set the goal at zero,” Merlino stated. “Patient safety must be an uncompromisable core value of your organization.” “What I find in some of the organizations that we work with is that they have differing degrees of alignment around the topic.  Obviously, nobody comes to work in healthcare because they think about wanting to harm a patient.”

“But accidents do happen, because we’re human.  We just need to think about how to integrate the best possible processes into the care system, and it has to start with a commitment from leadership to model these practices and create a culture that is deeply patient-centric.”

Read the full article on the Health IT Analytics website!


Sponsored Advertisement:


Generic Robotics Provides New Simutouch Simulators for Healthcare Industries

generic robotics

Recently learned about a new company on the scene helping to develop new simulators! Generic Robotics got started with in Dentistry but is looking to expand into other healthcare areas soon.

SimuTouch is the first general purpose clinical skills training platform. It is based on a proven simulation software and hardware approach, which can be adapted for a wide range of clinical procedures. Generic Robotics produces training devices for clinical skills built around “haptics” – the science of touch feedback. Our dental training simulators have been developed in collaboration with leading universities and have been used by King’s College London and Portsmouth Dental Academy. We are now expanding into other medical and surgical fields, to bring our products to a wider audience.

Learn more at the Generic Robotics website today!

Homeland Security Simulation Center Offers Realistic Training for Disaster Preparedness

response simulation for ems and ed

Utilizing a newly designed self-built simulator, Concordia’s Center for Homeland Security Studies, provides students with a way to learn disaster response scenarios. Learners deal with real world changing environment which includes traffic, wind conditions, fire movement and more.

Excerpt from Disaster Management:

The simulation center, part of Concordia’s Center for Homeland Security Studies, offers specific training on disaster preparedness and response for the university’s students and for outside groups. The centerpiece is the Advanced Disaster Management Simulator virtual reality platform.

During an exercise, the simulator allows first responders to progress through a scene using avatars. Others are down the hall at a command post, receiving information through a computer feed and being interviewed periodically by actors pretending to be reporters.

This strategic messaging piece is critical, said Cliff Gyves, director of the Homeland Security Simulation Center. “We give them a sense of information chaos through our fake newscasts,” he said. “The kids all have phones. You can tell them not to post, but they will, and it’s going to get picked up by the regular media.”

Clients from the local area as well as other states have used the simulator, often at the end of a one- or two-day training session. Although schools wanting to simulate their response to an active shooter are frequent clients, other scenarios involve situations such as a disaster at a large construction site, or a biohazard. The center has a mobile version of the lab that can do smaller simulations too.

“We can take a client’s existing plan, develop a scenario around that, and have them run through the simulation to recognize any gaps,” said Scott Winegar, director of Concordia’s Center for Homeland Security Studies. They can then modify the plan to correct the problems and do a final exercise to see if the modifications worked.

The simulator, which has been operational for about six months, took several months to develop and install. It is currently being used on average at least once a week. For most services that include a simulation — normally formal classroom training with a capstone simulation — the rate is $2,000 for four hours and $3,500 for a full eight-hour day, Gyves said.

Read the full article on the Emergency Management website!


Supported Organization:


SimCentric Creates Ambience: Simulated Crowds for Virtual Trainers

ambience simcentric crowds simulation

The most realistic simulations will provide the most realistic training outcomes. That is why SimCentric has developed Ambience, a software add-on that allows virtual reality developers to attend crowds to their simulation training experiences.

About Ambience from SimCentric:

The international defense industry has devoted thousands of hours and millions of dollars to building high-fidelity training environments. These “lifelike” environments often include geo-specific cities and towns to provide “realistic” military training.

But where are the people? Where are the cars? And where are the realistic patterns of life and urban clutter? You could be forgiven for thinking that all military operations take place in abandoned towns from “The Walking Dead”.

But as you know, they don’t. These operations often take place in busy and chaotic urban environments where people and vehicles behave in unpredictable ways. This is why the optimum training scenario must include a realistic pattern of life, and the ability to generate these living, breathing, vibrant environments quickly and efficiently.

To meet this systemic industry requirement, SimCentric has created the Ambience andAmbience Pro programs. These pattern-of-life programs enable a synthetic environment to be rapidly populated with thousands of people and hundreds of vehicles with just a few mouse clicks, all using existing environment avatars.

Bring genuine realism to your environment with full control over population size, area, demographics, behaviors, reactions to events and speed of movement. Reflect social nuances with a single click to emulate western societies (movement along footpaths, crossing at designated areas) or developing nations (crossing at various locations, randomized oblique movements). Create larger groups to imitate rallies or protests; assign anger or curiosity to some or all avatars to reflect a population’s reaction to events or entities. With click and drop logic points you can reflect a population’s attraction to an arriving aid vehicle, avoidance of a concealed IED, or fleeing from an insurgent vehicle. Your imagination is the only limitation.

With your customized but autonomous population, you can now add hundreds of vehicles to add further realism to your virtual environment, all of which are de-conflicted with human movement. Select vehicle types, speed, movement, adherence to road laws, and radius of operation as you require.

Learn more on the SimCentric Ambience Webpage!

SimGHOSTS USA 2016 Day 2 Opens with Laerdal Sponsored Plenary Address From ASPE President

simghosts aspe standardized patients

Today at SimGHOSTS 2016 USA Laerdal Medical sponsored the opening plenary address by Grace Gephart Director, PULSE Center at Arkansas Children’s Hospital and ASPE President.

About Grace

Grace Gephardt, MEd is the Director of the PULSE Simulation Center at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. She joined the PULSE Center in 2007 as their Standardized Patient Educator and became the Director in 2013. In her tenure, she has been involved in creating and implementing numerous comprehensive simulation scenarios for multidisciplinary use, including the development and launching of a national training in patient/family communications for pediatric chaplains. In 2014, she was nominated for and received the ‘Outstanding SP Educator of the Year’ award from the Association of Standardized Patient Educators and currently serves as President on the organization’s Board of Directors. Grace is also a member of SSH, SESAM and SimGHOSTS.

About ASPE

In 1963 a neurologist by the name of Howard Barrows discovered that a lay person could be trained to simulate illness and give feedback to medical students about their history and communication skills. He called this person a simulated patient and defined it as “a person who has been carefully coached to simulate an actual patient so accurately that the simulation cannot be detected by a skilled clinician. In performing the simulation, the SP presents the gestalt of the patient being simulated; not just the history, but the body language, the physical findings, and the emotional and personality characteristics as well.” Gradually, the use of the simulated patient began to grow in medical education. Educators found that simulated patients offered not only a variety of teaching opportunities for students, but also opportunities for testing student performance. Out of this testing environment grew the term “standardized patient” or “SP.”

As Gayle Gliva-McConvey explains, “An SP is a person trained to portray a patient scenario, or an actual patient using their own history and physical exam findings, for the instruction, assessment, or practice of communication and/or examining skills of a health care provider. In the health and medical sciences, SPs are used to provide a safe and supportive environment conducive for learning or for standardized assessments. SPs can serve as practice models, or participate in sophisticated assessment and feedback of learner’s abilities or services. The use of simulated scenarios involving humans is rapidly expanding to meet the needs of many high-risk service fields outside of human health care.” As simulated/standardized patient methodology grew, educators felt a need to develop an organization that could foster the growth of the profession that was creating and supporting this new methodology. Thus, in 2001, the Association of Standardized Patients was formed.

Since that time, our membership has grown along with the concept of standardized patients. Its use has expanded into many fields including dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and allied health professions. Over the last decade, three simulation modalities have become intertwined – scenarios may now include SPs, task trainers and/or manikins; commonly known as “hybrid” simulations.

About Laerdal

The Laerdal Company was established in 1940. During our first two decades, we created innovative toys and books for children. In 1958, the company started to dedicate itself to advancing the cause of resuscitation and emergency care. In 1960, the first patient simulator Resusci Anne manikin was introduced to the market. A new logo was needed to reflect our mission. Our founder, Åsmund S. Laerdal, chose the image of the Good Samaritan. It depicts the ancient tale of the traveller whose selfless compassion and care saved the life of a total stranger. This became our emblem and our inspiration.

Today, Laerdal Medical is dedicated to helping save lives with product solutions, services, and system solutions that support the Chain of Survival. The Good Samaritan logo symbolizes our commitment to every health professional and volunteer who has learned how to save the life of a family member, friend, or stranger in need. The vision of Laerdal is that no-one should die or be disabled unnecessarily during birth or from sudden illness or trauma. Since its creation of the pioneering, and now world famous CPR practise manikin in 1960, the Resusci Anne; many more innovative products have followed to improve and support education for Healthcare Professionals around the world, as well as facilitate the spread of CPR knowledge and skills to the would be Samaritan in the wider lay community.

Laerdal has developed break-through technologies that have helped to define its portfolio of simulation, micro-simulation, virtual reality, automated external defibrillators and emergency therapeutic products as reputable market leaders. Other well-known brands include SimMan,SimBaby, SimNewB, HeartStart, Q-CPR, Stifneck, the Pocket Mask and BaXstrap.

Learn more about ASPE and follow #SG16USA for all the latest!

SimGHOSTS USA 2016 Opens at Jump Trading Simulation Center Sponsored by SimulationIQ

simnext jump trading simulation center

John Vozenilek, MD, FACEP Vice President and Chief Medical Officer for Jump Simulation provided the opening keynote address this morning in Peoria IL at the Jump Simulation Center through OSF Healthcare, which was Platinum Sponsored by SimulationIQ. Over 200 simulation champions from around the world joined together to connect with more than 17 vendors at the event.

About SimGHOSTS

SimGHOSTS, aka The Gathering Of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists, is an international US-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to supporting individuals and institutions operating medical simulation technology and spaces through: hands-on training events, online resources, and professional development. “SimGHOSTS envisions a healthcare education culture where people are empowered to use simulation technology to improve learning and patient care outcomes.” The team puts on events around the world to help those looking to start or increase the use of simulation based technologies.

About “Dr. Voz”

Prior to his appointment as Vice President and Chief Medical Officer for Simulation for the Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center, “Dr. Voz” was the Director of Simulation Technology and Immersive Learning program for the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University where he provided central coordination and oversight for the undergraduate, graduate, interdisciplinary, and continuing medical education programs. Under his direction, the medical school created additional organizational capabilities and infrastructure, building resources for educators who wish to use additional innovative learning technologies for teaching and assessment, measuring success with patient-based outcomes research.

In May of 2008, Dr. Vozenilek co-chaired the first Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)- sponsored national consensus conference on using simulation research to define and develop clinical expertise. In his work at Northwestern he served as faculty for the Institute for Healthcare Research and its Center for Patient Safety, and continues to teach within its master’s degree program in health care quality and safety. He is currently the chair of the Simulation Academy within the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Chair of the American Board of Medical Specialties Working Group on the use of Simulation for Maintenance of Board Certification for practicing physicians.

His use of simulation and research has included delivery of training and assessment of technical and non-technical competencies, and the use of simulation to emulate a clinical environment for work flow and process change, including electronic health care records (e.g. handoff and inter-hospital patient transfers). These projects demonstrate his expertise in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to create and sustain simulations for clinical environments and produce meaningful interventions with enhance health care reliability.

About Jump Trading Simulation Center

Jump Trading Simulation and Education Center opened in April of 2013. Jump was made possible, in part, from a generous $25 million donation named for Jump Trading, a Chicago based trading firm. A collaboration between OSF HealthCare and the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Jump is a world-class facility transforming health care through education, research, and innovation. Over 84,000 learning experiences occurred at Jump in the past year, and that number is expected to grow steadily as our programs expand. State-of-the-art simulation devices and facilities attract the finest minds in clinical education and provide the highest level of medical research, training and innovation. Collaboration throughout our community, the region, the nation, and even the world happens every day at Jump and is the cornerstone of our vision to transform health care.

The third and fourth floor of the Jump building are currently being prepared to house the Performance Improvement, Data Analytics, Telehealth, ARCHES, and Clinical Research departments of OSF HealthCare. The rational is that research and development are at the core of what we are doing. Engineers will need access to data to understand what the opportunities are, clinicians to be subject matter experts in the monitoring, care delivery and population health data, simulated environments to test and refine their research before they are tested in clinical trials, and ultimately performance improvement to disseminate the new processes and technologies across our Ministry. This is a place where we can work on projects that will help us make leap growth solutions.

About EMS SimulationIQ

Whether you’re running a single simulation event or thousands, EMS’ SIMULATIONiQ™ uses the latest web-based technologies to simply and seamlessly capture, organize, and analyze the full spectrum of your clinical skills and mannequin-based simulation efforts. Working alongside subject matter experts, we serve as the driving force behind numerous consumer-centered innovations that continue to move the medical simulation software markets forward with breakthrough technologies. The results are tangible: greater visibility, usability, marketability, adaptability, scalability, measurement, and ROI. EMS offers complete turnkey solutions for clinical simulation training environments that include high stakes exams with standardized patients and integration with simulators, audio-video technology, design and planning, engineering, configuration, installation, training, and one-call support for both software and hardware.

Although the success of your clinical simulation program largely relies on educators, as simulation management technology and methodology become more sophisticated, it is important for sim tech staff to be an ongoing partner for planning, maintenance, and problem solving.

Sim tech staff need to interact not only with internal stakeholders but also with external simulation center management companies such as EMS to ensure that: all communication lines are open to make sure needs and requirements are perfectly clear; continuous engagement is maintained before, during, and after a clinical simulation center is built; common ground is established between the educators, planning, and tech staff for successful outcomes. Since its founding in 1994, EMS has established a reputation for delivering superior and dependable solutions and providing unprecedented levels of customer service and support keeping our customers on the leading edge. www.SIMULATIONiQ.com

Learn more about SimGHOSTS USA 2016 and follow @SimGHOSTS #SG16USA for more!

Laerdal Asks Simulation Experts “Is Simulation Just About the Simulator?” and More…

At the 2016 International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (IMSH) in San Diego, California, Laerdal Medical queried the experts in attendance on a variety of topics, including “Is simulation just about the simulator?” With innovations in technology expanding teaching and learning options over the past decade, simulation has become an integral part of medical education at all levels. During the event Laerdal covered a series of important questions with the following video interview topics.

dr amar patel laerdal

Laerdal’s Ask the Experts Series:

  1. Does Simulation Work?
  2. How does deliberate practice and debriefing work?
  3. How do I make a case for simulation?
  4. Is simulation just about the simulator?
  5. How do people manage the process of change?
  6. How do people sustain their simulation programs?
  7. What makes a good supplier partner for simulation?

Watch the entire 7 videos series from Laerdal here!

CAE Healthcare Shares Patient Safety Foundation Info Graphic

pt safety sim

CAE Healthcare covered the NPSF last week and shared this info graphic of tips to reduce patient harm established by the group:

The National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) issued a report which calls for ‘federal agencies to create a portfolio of national standard patient safety processes’ across the care continuum, and ‘to retire invalid measures that are not useful or meaningful.’

Here, above, are the eight recommendations from the National Patient Safety Foundation to achieve this goal. The full report, “Free from Harm: Accelerating Patient Safety Improvement Fifteen Years after To Err Is Human” (Boston, MA; 2015) is available online.

CAE Healthcare is a medical simulation/simulation training company with a mission to improve healthcare education and patient safety. The global leader in simulation-based healthcare training, product design and manufacture, CAE Healthcare produces patient manikins / nursing manikins; surgical simulators, ultrasound simulation trainers, and clinical simulation management solutions for customers in more than 60 countries around the world.

Read more about Patient Safety on the CAE Healthcare website

Plan for Australasian Simulation Congress Late September

australasian simulation conference australia

Monday 26 September – Thursday 29 September 2016
Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre, Victoria, Australia

Simulation Australasia, the national body for those working in simulation in Australasia, will once again bring together the SimHealth and SimTecT conferences under the name of the Australasian Simulation Congress (ASC) with opportunities for a number of joint sessions of mutual interest. In 2016, it will also incorporate the International Simulation and Gaming Association (ISAGA).

About Simulation Australasia

Simulation Australasia and the SimTecT / SimHealth Organising Committees invite you to join us at the inaugural Australasian Simulation Congress. This year we are Melbourne bound, to celebrate in effect, our coming of age. Yes, it’s our 21st birthday and a new chapter begins.

You are encouraged to join us in highlighting the leadership that thrives within our community (both local and abroad) as we unite again, SimTecT and SimHealth, now together as curated streams of the newly titled Australasian Simulation Congress. This year we also stand alongside an old ally, the International Simulation and Gaming Association (ISAGA), as we incorporate their 47th meeting and throw open our doors to a wider public audience.

The sense of achievement was palpable as we celebrated the conclusion of our 20th conference year in 2015. Delegates, exhibitors and committee members alike were basking in the perception of a job well done, relationships forged, deals struck and opportunities identified. It was a time for celebration!

After all, is that not our purpose? Of course it is, celebration of the potential in this community of ours!

The SimAust Chairman, Dr Mike Brennan, has declared we are at the nexus of technology, academia and industry. Indeed we are, for this is a year that we bring a spotlight to you, our industry partners. For the first time in many years, perhaps in our history, we have appointed an Exhibition Convenor, to bring industry capability to an equal partnership with scientific research in our Congress program. Make no mistake, we deeply value the scientific contribution our research community brings to this event, and we think the best way to secure our place in academic society is to draw a firm line in the sand, and so we have determined that if it’s not research, it needs a new home in the Congress schedule. This year, our Exhibition will have a dedicated program of activities, an industry showcase event will be held in the Exhibition Hall, and our Exhibitors will have unprecedented engagement in signature events throughout the Congress.

We want to be heard in Melbourne above the fever pitch of the AFL Grand Final week – will you come and help us make some noise!! We are so excited about showing off our amazing industry, and look forward to discussing with you what that looks like for your business. Our team is ready to build the show with you.

Learn more at the Australasian Simulation Conference Website today!

Supporting Transitions in Medical Career Pathways: the Role of Simulation-Based Education

advances in simulation journal

Have you checked out the Advances in Simulation journal yet? Great news it’s free for everyone online thanks to the folks at SESAM! Just finished reviewing “Supporting transitions in medical career pathways: the role of simulation-based education” by Jennifer Cleland et al., and found it very useful for us all to consider!

About Advances in Simulation Journal

Advances in Simulation provides a forum to share scholarly practice to advance the use of simulation in the context of health and social care. Advances in Simulation publishes articles that cover all science and social science disciplines, all health and social care professions and multi- and inter-professional studies. The journal includes articles relevant to simulation that include the study of health care practice, human factors, psychology, sociology, anthropology, communication, teamwork, human performance, education, learning technology, economics, biomedical engineering, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, therapeutics, scientific computation, simulation modelling, population studies, theatre, craft, program evaluation and more.

Abstract

Transitions, or periods of change, in medical career pathways can be challenging episodes, requiring the transitioning clinician to take on new roles and responsibilities, adapt to new cultural dynamics, change behaviour patterns, and successfully manage uncertainty. These intensive learning periods present risks to patient safety. Simulation-based education (SBE) is a pedagogic approach that allows clinicians to practise their technical and non-technical skills in a safe environment to increase preparedness for practice. In this commentary, we present the potential uses, strengths, and limitations of SBE for supporting transitions across medical career pathways, discussing educational utility, outcome and process evaluation, and cost and value, and introduce a new perspective on considering the gains from SBE. We provide case-study examples of the application of SBE to illustrate these points and stimulate discussion.

Conclusions

Increasing doctors’ preparedness to perform the skills and behaviours required to fulfil the responsibilities of any new role is important for patient safety, service efficiency, and individual psychological well-being. Whilst true mastery of a role cannot be achieved until one is immersed within the workplace itself [6], the literature indicates that we can go some way to preparing individuals for the technical and non-technical elements of any new role, and indeed the associated psychological challenges, through the judicious and imaginative use of SBE. In this paper, we have provided an overview of some of the key factors associated with planning and evaluating SBE for transitions.

We have also highlighted a number of areas for future research in SBE to support medical career transitions. These include the development of understanding around the practical factors to be considered when designing SBE, ranging from the delivery of feedback and the incorporation of longer term outcome measures to analysis of the cost-effectiveness of the approach being undertaken, as well as the socio-cultural influences on learning in simulated settings. We urge those working in SBE research to consider how best to identify and evaluate concrete specific outcomes of SBE for this purpose. There remains the need for further investigation into the use of SBE to support the transition from medical student to junior doctor, but we urge those working in this area to not neglect examining the use of SBE to support later medical career transitions where “learners” are working with less supervision and increasing responsibility yet where (largely non-technical) issues pertinent to patient safety remain apparent.

Read the full article on the Advances in Simulation Journal