Featured Job Listing: Simulation Technician Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

stanford simulation

Simulation Technician – LINKS Training & Support
Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

Category: Clinical Services
Job Type: Part-Time
Shift: Days
Location: Palo Alto, CA, United States
Req: 5831
FTE: 0.6 (Clinical Services 0.6 FTE, 8 Hour; Schedule varies)

Job Link

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford is the heart and soul of Stanford Children’s Health. Nationally ranked and internationally recognized, our 311-bed hospital is devoted entirely to pediatrics and obstetrics. Our six centers of excellence provide comprehensive services and deep expertise in key obstetric and pediatric areas: brain & behavior, cancer, heart, pregnancy & newborn, pulmonary and transplant. We also provide an additional, wide range of services for babies, kids and pregnant moms.

Job Summary

The Simulation Technician facilitates the practice and experience of applying new medical techniques, using a wide variety of technologies and methodologies. This role will assist the Simulation Specialist in the implementing new services and features for existing systems.

Essential Functions

The essential functions listed are typical examples of work performed by positions in this job classification.  They are not designed to contain or be interpreted as a comprehensive inventory of all duties, tasks, and responsibilities.  Employees may also perform other duties as assigned.

Employees must abide by all Joint Commission Requirements including but not limited to sensitivity to cultural diversity, patient care, patient rights and ethical treatment, safety and security of physical environments, emergency management, teamwork, respect for others, participation in ongoing education and training, communication and adherence to safety and quality programs, sustaining compliance with National Patient Safety Goals, and licensure and health screenings.

Must perform all duties and responsibilities in accordance with the Service Standards of the Hospital(s).


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  • Assists with medical simulation training by preparing for session, setting up task trainers and operating patient simulators during medical simulation scenarios
  • Prepares, plans and creates realistic simulations. Works with other staff to maintain and manage all aspects of the Simulation Lab
  • Assists in continued integration of medical simulation methodologies in curriculum, including education training, skill development and assessment
  • Operates and maintain task trainers, mannequin-based simulators, virtual reality procedural trainers and associated supplies and equipment
  • Collaborates with vendors to troubleshoot equipment and system problems and to implement hardware and software updates
  • Participates in community outreach programs and other duties as assigned
  • Sets up, operation of, and pack down of skills, simulation, and associated education equipment
  • Assists in video production such as planning, filming, and editing

Minimum Qualifications

Any combination of education and experience that would likely provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities as well as possession of any required licenses or certifications is qualifying.

Education: High School Diploma or GED equivalent

Experience: Three (3) years of directly related work experience

License/Certification: None

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities

These are the observable and measurable attributes and skills required to perform successfully the essential functions of the job and are generally demonstrated through qualifying experience, education, or licensure/certification.

  • Ability to coordinate multiple meetings and resources (people, equipment, locations)
  • Ability to maintain confidentiality of sensitive information
  • Ability to plan, organize, prioritize, work independently and meet deadlines
  • Ability to work effectively with individuals at all levels of the organization
  • Knowledge in operating high fidelity mannequin-based simulators, Audio Visual technologies, and other simulation related Information Technology systems.
  • Knowledge of new technologies (in specific field) and maintain and stay abreast of updates and changes.
  • Knowledge of hospital policies, procedures and safety and health requirements
  • Knowledge of  PC-based and Mac-based office, Audio Visual, and editing software, computers and operating systems and ability to troubleshoot the equipment

Physical Requirements and Working Conditions

The Physical Requirements and Working Conditions in which the job is typically performed are available from the Occupational Health Department. Reasonable accommodations will be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions of the job.

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!


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Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare Updates

aspih uk simulation conference 2016

A few updates from our friends at ASPiH!

The 2016 ASPiH UK November Bristol Conference Agenda Brochure has been posted, with keynote announcement by Dr. John Vozenilek MD, FACEP. Chief Medical Officer Jump Simulation and Education Centre University of Illinois. This is a multidisciplinary conference focusing on the latest research, technologies and applications of simulated practice 15th-17th November 2016 at the Mercure Grand Hotel in Bristol.

ASPiH and the Chartered Institute for Ergonomics and Human Factors (CIEHF) are pleased to announce a series of co-designed one day workshops to help illustrate and enhance the integration of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) methodologies within health care education and delivery.


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Thursday 29th September 2016 – Glasgow Crowne Plaza
Tuesday 15th November 2016 – Bristol Mercure Grande

Each event will feature presentation of different case studies to enable participants to consider the techniques used in more depth and gain an appreciation of the application of HFE across a range of health care contexts and purposes. We are in discussion with CIEHF regarding options for publishing a report or summary paper that will feature selected case studies for wider circulation to policy makers, regulators, commissioners, and professional bodies in healthcare.

Finally, membership to the ASPiH website has been upgraded with the following opportunities:

  • Discounted registration fee at the annual ASPiH Conference
  • Discount with selected affiliate organisations
  • Subsidised fees at selected UK regional events
  • Reduced rates for ASPiH delivered or supported training courses
  • Reduced subscription rate for the BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning Journal
  • Opportunity to be involved with ASPiH Special Interest Groups (SIGS) relevant to expertise/speciality
  • Eligible for being invited to Chair positions in SIGS and for membership of the Executive committee
  • Opportunity to promote job vacancies free of charge on the ASPiH website
  • Communications Receive direct email notices and quarterly e-Newsletter from ASPiH
  • Receive the ASPiH Annual Report summarising the Associations’ member-driven activities and key initiatives
  • Connect with other members and experts via our community

Visit ASPiH’s website for more great resources from UK’s leading Simulation Organization!

Lance Baily To Support the Launch of New Preterm Simulator from SimCharacters

preterm simulator

Sim Champs it must be clear by now that as the Founder of HealthySimulation, SimGHOSTS and other simulation-based resources that I have a passion for the technological innovation of the healthcare simulation industry. I truly believe in the power of this methodology and technology to help improve learning and patient safety outcomes. Happy to announce today that I will be working for the next few months as a “Marketing and Strategy Consultant” with the Austrian-based company SimCharacters to help with the launch of their new High Emotion preterm simulator, Paul.

This summer while traveling between SESAM and SimGHOSTS events I had the opportunity to come through Vienna to meet with the SimCharacters team, who are located in the same offices as SimStation. I was amazed how these two companies and their partners and leveraged two decades of experience to connect development, project management, clinical education, video production, website, and media production facility design into a powerful collaborative group.


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Founded by Neonatologist and Simulation Trainer Dr. Jens-Christian Schwindt, the new company brings together a wonderful team of mechanical/electrical engineers, movie special effects and makeup artists, software developers, clinical educators, and business entrepreneurs that I immediately connected with. Having seen the latest prototype of the Paul High Emotion Simulator, I can attest that this powerful new technology will massively enhance the learning opportunities of neonate teams around the world like nothing we have seen before.

As usual, keep following @HealthySim on twitter for daily simulation resources and visit SimGHOSTS for upcoming announcements about their 2017 hands-on simulation technology training conferences.

I’ll be sharing more updates about this project as we near January’s IMSH 2017 but for now be sure to follow SimCharacters on Facebook where more english translated articles are coming soon!


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DextaRobotics Builds Hand Haptics Device for Virtual Reality Medical Learning

simulated learning in vr

One of the limitations of current virtual reality systems is the lack of tactile feel when engaging with realistic learning environments. Angleing a scalpel, inserting an NG tube, feeling a pulse — all of these critical skills that require touch to learn and perform properly. where touch Without a doubt physical touch technology will have to become integrated into advanced technologies in-order to maximize learning outcomes. Recently, Dexta Robotics released a product which is taking a giant leap forward into the touch of VR. Check out the video to see the prototype in action:


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About Dexmo

Compared to other force feedback devices, Dexmo is very light. It can run on battery power and work wirelessly for a relatively long time. Dexmo captures 11 DoF of users’ hand motion. The mechanical linkage nature makes the readings much more robust compared to IMUs. The force feedback ability allows the user to feel the size and shape of any digital object, which greatly improves immersion. Variable stiffness is achieved by precise motor control. With this feature, each virtual object can have their own stiffness. In the past two years we have made over 20 iterations of Dexmo and tested numerous force feedback methods. These valuable experiences helped us build a better human-machine-interaction tool.

Learn more about the Dexmo on the DextaRobotics Website

Updates from SimGHOSTS, The Leaders in Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Support

sim tech conference

SimGHOSTS recently wrapped their 2016 global events in the United States, Australia, and in the United Kingdom (with their partner ASPiH). Check out these awesome updates from the world’s leading non-profit organization supporting healthcare simulation technology specialists.


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Remember there is still 50% discounted annual subscription to SimGHOSTS.org to celebrate their recent affiliation with INACSL. Subscribe today to gain access to the course library, and watch all the recorded sessions from the SimGHOSTS 2016 events!

New OMNI2 Simulator Control Tablet from Gaumard

gaumard simulator tablet

Check out this latest product release from Gaumard, which has recently also upgraded to a tablet to manage their simulator learning experiences:

OMNI 2 Simulation Made Easy The new OMNI 2 is an easy-to-use, wireless device interface designed to operate Gaumard patient simulators and skills trainers. It offers instructors the essential tools to drive simulation-based training sessions without the complexity of programming. Simply tap and go.

OMNI 2 makes it easier than ever to drive scenarios, monitor performance, and capture participants’ actions for data-rich debriefing sessions. OMNI 2 is simple to operate with touchscreen controls and an intuitive layout that lets you manage physiological changes while remaining focused on the training. Put simply, it’s a frustration-free solution that works to complement your clinical know-how.


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Control

  • Wireless communication lets you move freely to better observe the action
  • Over 35 programmable vitals including: HR, ECG, RR, BP, SpO2, EtCO2, and more
  • One-touch vitals controls facilitate changes on-the-fly or trending over time

Monitoring

  • Monitor CPR quality metrics in real time to ensure quality
  • Supports optional virtual patient monitor for training assessment and decision-making skills
  • Monitor ventilation quality and its effectiveness on the patient

Debriefing

  • Timestamped log records provider actions, vital signs changes, and notes to aid debriefing
  • Includes preprogrammed lists of common provider actions for easy tracking
  • Save and share session log for archiving and debriefing

Learn more at the OMNI2 Webpage

Why You & Your Simulation Program Should Avoid Flying United Airlines

why united airlines is the worst(Image via Bloomberg)

When I started HealthySimulation.com 7 years ago my goal was to provide honest unfiltered advice, resources, news and information to healthcare simulation champions around the world. We’ve heard back from a lot of readers that many of the 1,000+ articles on this website have helped their programs successfully start and expand their programs, connecting the right people, equipment, resources, and knowledge to overcome any of the many challenges we all face.

Today will mark the first day I write an article recommending you completely avoid utilizing one specific company when dealing with the logistics of your simulation program, and beyond that, to your professional and personal life. As someone who wants to see your simulation program succeed, I feel it is my duty to inform you that United Airlines should be avoided as your mode of air transportation at all costs. I’m not alone, AirlineQuality.com peer reviews rated United Airlines a 3/10!

I am blessed to be able to travel around the world to host and attend simulation conferences that have taken place in numerous different countries. Of course this has meant I have flown countless hours in economy class with a multitude of carriers — and have seen a dramatic range of services from the industry small and large.

Out of all the carriers I have ever flown, United Airlines has consistently proved to care the least about their passengers. It’s not the poor quality of food served, the minimal legroom (at 6’1″ I literally could not move my legs on my last United flight), and embarrassingly out of date video entertainment systems (which if available at all are flat in the seat in front of you so when the person ahead of you puts their seat back your screen is now irreversibly angled downward). As bad as that sounds, I can exhaust a deep sigh and live with all that without writing an article about it.

What I can’t live with is the fact that during the multiple errors regarding my UA flights around the world through their airlines, their customer service reps consistently demonstrated that they could care less about my needs. Even after waiting 45 minutes in line, I have seen a UA rep play games on their phone until a supervisor showed up. I have been lied to by multiple UA reps about associated change fees. I have seen normal weather conditions be blamed for late service with no overnight support. I have heard UA employees tell me “There’s nothing I can do about what another UA rep told you, it’s not my fault”.

Repeatedly I have experienced United Airline’s out of date service model that blames the customer at every turn, taking any opportunity to make another dollar today over the building of a long-term relationship.


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Contrast this experience with a company like Southwest Airlines — that consistently goes above and beyond to provide welcoming, understanding, and flexible customer service that knows the life long relationship is the most important priority for the airline. (Southwest is my absolute favorite airlines by the way and I keep asking them to expand further internationally).

While United Airlines may seem cheaper than other carriers for your flights to simulation events, I urge you to consider the strong potential for an unpleasant experience and unforeseeable fees that will show up if almost anything goes wrong.

Bloomberg recently wrote an article about United Airlines which shared some pretty shocking information:

  • Recently the carrier agreed to pay $2.8 million in fines for tarmac delays and the poor treatment of disabled passengers.
  • On all major performance metrics—delays, cancellations, mishandled bags, and bumped passengers—United has, since 2012, been reliably the worst or near worst among its competitors.
  • In 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, United was responsible for 43 percent of all consumer complaints filed against U.S. airlines.
  • There has been 3 different CEOs in the past year
  • Many of the merged airline’s front-line employees complained that management, having promised significant savings to Wall Street, focused on cutting costs above all else.

Bottom line: If I have ANY other alternative when booking travel for myself and others, I will always take another carrier over United Airlines. Do yourself and your sim program a favor and consider doing the same!

Check out more of the Bloomberg article about the failure that is United Airlines

Tweet us your experiences about United Airlines with @HealthySim & @United

WISER Provides Simulation Courses For All Staff Positions

healthcare simulation training program

Did you know that UPMC’s WISER Simulation Center offers several courses and programs to help those in the simulation community improve their skills. Our iSIM course is offered in various worldwide locations and we have had preceptors from all over the world spend time watching and learning at WISER.

Courses include:

iSim: This 3-day internationally renowned program, created in collaborative effort between WISER at the University of Pittsburgh and the Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education at the University of Miami, is designed as an introduction to fundamental skills and abilities for delivering simulation-based healthcare education through a variety of techniques and technologies. The program emphasizes hands-on activities and active participation to maximize simulation-based instruction skill acquisition. Class group sizes are kept small to allow for maximum participation. The primary audience for this course are healthcare educators wishing to improve their skills as instructors in simulation education.

Designing or Enhancing Your Simulation Center: Welcome to “Designing or Enhancing Your Simulation Center”. This one day course is designed to assist those individuals or centers who are interested in designing new or updating existing simulation centers. This is an 8 topic course that will guide the participants, step by step, through the process of identifying their training needs and designing a world class simulation center to meet those needs. Topics include:


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  • Introduction to WISER and Course Overview
  • Identifying Your Center’s Training Missions
  • Blueprints to Build Out, Designing Your Center
  • Identifying your Center’s Audio and Video Needs
  • Administrative Considerations
  • Job Descriptions
  • Creating Environments
  • Additional Tips for Success

WISER Fellowship Program

The WISER Fellowship Program is available for individuals who are interested in an in-depth learning experience on all aspects of healthcare simulation. Fellowships typically last from one year to 18 months. The fellowship is a self-directed immersive journey into the world of healthcare simulation. Focuses for this fellowship program often include research, curriculum development, operations, or a combination of topics. All fellows will complete a curriculum (or project) based upon their specific needs that will support their focus.

How to Run a Successful Simulation Center: Participants of this two day program will learn best practices associated with the operations of a simulation center. Key operational, administrative, and technological elements of a successful simulation center will be reviewed. Topics such as creating budgets, staff considerations, daily operations, course development, and simulator programming will be discussed. Interactive exercises will allow participants to practice what they learned during course sessions.

TechSim: A variety of topics will be covered that are designed to educate simulation technicians / operations personnel on the key tasks associated with the daily operations and maintenance of a simulation center. The content topics were mapped to the SSH CHSOS Examination Blueprint. Topics include:

  • Simulation Center Technology
  • Scenario Creation
  • Repair and Maintenance Considerations
  • Running Sim Sessions and much more.

Visit the WISER Courses page to learn more!

The Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget

how to start using healthcare simulation

This summer I had two fantastic engagements that focused on helping simulation champions increase their program, by gaining additional financial support through considering the language of sales when dealing with administrators.

First was at the Global Network for Simulation in Healthcare meeting in Oxford last month which continued the work started by previous participants to identify and create a tool set for helping simulation champions convey the opportunities of simulation to administrators. Look out for industry-changing content from this group in the next twenty-four months.

The second was at the amazing SimulationIQ Platinum Sponsored SimGHOSTS 2016 USA event, during the SimNEXT sponsored keynote address by Jump Trading Simulation Center’s Director and CMO Dr. John Vozenilek, who demonstrated how their simulation program was seen as a cost-reduction center for the OSF Healthcare hospital.

While this conversation is not new to the world of healthcare simulation, in fact we covered it extensively in 2012 during the HealthySimAdmin event which you can watch here, the conversation has definitely evolved to become a primary concern of simulation program directors and industry partners around the world.

To grow your simulation program, the concept is simple:

To increase your simulation program you will need increased financial and institutional resources, and to do that, you need to gain the support of the highest level administrators possible from your organization. So how do you successful start and maintain that conversation with institutional leadership so they become as impassioned about simulation as you are? As clinicians, researchers, educators, administrators, and technology specialists, we may not have the learned the tools necessary to convey this message in a way that can be heard by the other side.


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As a documentary film-maker I learned at an early age that I need to craft my message in a way that can be understood by the audience. If they cannot understand parts of my message, or they are missing context, or don’t have a chance to build the right frame of mind — then my efforts would not translate into the understanding the audience was willing to consume. When it comes to marketing, the first thing I read was that “no one cares about your problems, they only care about their own”.

In that reality, we need to start our campaign to increase simulation not from our perspective, but from the perspective of the highest level administrators we will need to participate in-order to move the program forward in a big way. The question then becomes: What are their priorities, their needs, and most importantly their problems? Usually, the priorities in healthcare education are for maximum learner pass rates and in professional healthcare for increased quality of care with minimal costs. BOTH groups usually share the same primary problem: finances.

With this knowledge we can begin to speak to organizational leadership within the right frame to capture their attention, provide solutions, and create big wins.

Well as healthcare simulation champions we are comfortable with learning a new language, of being early-adopters and challenging the status quo with innovative practices, equipment and programs. We too must also challenge ourselves to also learn the “language of sales” to help those around us see what we see: that simulation improves efficiency and quality, while ultimately reducing costs.

Each week over the next month I will share a book, website, movie, or other resource that can you speak this “language of sales” in an effort to increase your opportunity to expand your simulation program. Topics will include why and how to craft “an elevator pitch”, how to identify key stakeholders and their priorities, sales messaging, and relationship building.

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The Must-Own Healthcare Simulation Library *Updated for 2016

medical simulation books

Sim Champs! Have you seen the latest list of awesome healthcare simulation books? These must-own volumes will help you develop, maintain, expand your simulation program. Whether it’s clinical faculty debriefing techniques, administrative tips, or technical prep for the CHSOS — everything below will have your team ready for any simulation challenge:

Latest Additions:



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Here’s the older collection of medical simulation books that are still must-reads:

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