University of Nebraska Medical Center Gains New ‘Simulation in Motion’ Truck

Norfolk to be home of new ‘Simulation in Motion’ truck

Norfolk Daily News recently shared a news story highlighting how the University of Nebraska Medical Center unveiled four “Simulation in Motion” trucks at a special ceremony last Wednesday in Omaha. Looking for resources on how to build your own mobile simulation truck? Check out the numerous recorded courses on SimGHOSTS.org!

The 44-foot long, dual-axle customized trucks soon will be deployed and stationed in Norfolk, Lincoln, Kearney and Scottsbluff. The UNMC College of Nursing has divisions in those cities. The customized trucks, funded by a $5.5 million grant from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, feature a mobile simulation, real-life training experience designed to increase life-saving training opportunities through high-tech simulation. The training is free and targeted to rural emergency medical service agencies and rural critical access hospitals.


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“We are excited to partner with UNMC to bring state-of-the-art simulation training to rural communities,” said Walter Panzirer, a trustee of the Helmsley Charitable Trust. Gail Suhr, an emergency medical technician with Bloomfield Ambulance Service, is excited about the prospects of the training. “After 34 years in the emergency medical services, this is one of the best things to happen, and I hope everyone takes advantage of it. There’s so much we can learn through these trucks,” Suhr said.

The trucks feature dual slide-out room extensions, a simulated emergency room and an ambulance, as well as computerized mannequins that talk, breathe, have heartbeats, and can react to medications and other actions of the learners. They can die and be revived over and over again. Each mobile unit is outfitted with supplies to recreate a realistic environment for learners that includes: pre-programmed computerized medical and trauma scenarios; monitors that display vital signs of patient simulators; and audio and video recording/playback capabilities.


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Canadian-Based QEII Foundation Raises 1.8 Million for New Simulation Program

High-stakes education: Simulation training at QEII

Wouldn’t 1.8M be great for your simluation program? Learn how the Charles V. Keating Emergency and Trauma Centre at the QEII Health Sciences Centre was able to secure this funding to help improve the training of their healthcare professionals with this recent article from The Chronicle Herald Times:

Designed to provide a realistic medical teaching environment, the Sim Bay is heading toward a transformation that will turn the makeshift space into a state-of-the-art high fidelity simulation facility — as close to real life as possible. Once complete, it will play a key role in training various disciplines resulting in improved patient health outcomes.

The QEII Foundation raised $1.8-million to support this transformation as part of a simulation-based learning campaign.

“When the space is renovated, the sky is the limit for us. We’ve done great things with what we have and I know we can be so much better,” says Donna Warren, Simulation Coordinator, QEII Simulation Program. “If you’ve ever had a loved one who’s been in hospital, and whose care has been exemplary, behind that is hours and hours of simulation and getting it right.”


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Dr. Nick Sowers, medical director of the Sim Bay, works closely with various groups of learners at the QEII to direct simulations and offer medical oversight. He says the traditional medical philosophy of ‘see one, do one, teach one’ is quickly going by the wayside as simulation training proves its worth. Just one scenario provides crucial real-life training, and simulation training reduces the need for, and the risk of, experiential learning.

“By the time you’re a senior resident, the diagnosis and treatment is often not the hard part,” Dr. Sowers says. “One of the hardest parts is the ability to manage the room, to control yourself and stay calm; communicating effectively as a team during a crisis no matter how chaotic it is.” Taking charge and leading a team of staff in an emergency can take years for most physicians to perfect, but now, thanks to spaces like the current Sim Bay, self-admitted quiet people like fourth-year resident Dr. Samantha Jang-Stewart can find their voice before graduation.

“My first year doing simulation was terrifying because you’re a little unsure and still learning the medical side of things and then you’re supposed to be directing a team of people,” Dr. Jang-Stewart says. “It’s really nerve-wracking but with practice in sim, you get used to doing it and become more comfortable and confident.”This new-found confidence helped Dr. Jang-Stewart lead a team of residents to a first place finish at the Trauma Nova Scotia Simulation Olympics.

Canadian-Based Western University Launches New Healthcare Simulation Suite

Western's new robots offer nursing students life-like medical experience

Canadian-based Western University Gazette recently shared about the new Western’s Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing program simulation suite! Looking to get similar attention to your healthcare simulation program? Read our comprehensive Media guide!

The new simulation suite in the recently opened FIMS and Nursing building and has been in the works for years. The faculty’s first simulation suite opened in 2005, according to Barbara Sinclair, coordinator for simulated clinical education at the Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing. “You can’t just send students in after giving them a little bit of theory and a little bit of lab practice and expect that they’re going to be able to provide care for people,” Sinclair said. “Things are just far too complex.”

The new simulation suite is much larger than its predecessor with 16 hospital beds. Sinclair said students learn a variety skills from the simulation set up that go beyond the teachings of a textbook as they work on communication skills, critical thinking and problem solving.


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Nursing student Sachia Grogran recalled hearing patients scream “I can’t breathe, I’m going to die,” during the simulations. “It teaches you how to handle real life situations in a safe environment,” Grogan said. The robotic patients within the simulation hospital have a variety of illnesses and backstories that make each of them unique. “They get to understand the trajectory of chronic illness,” Sinclair said. “We looked at what the common things were that we were seeing — things like diabetes, stroke and lung disease; we wanted to get a good cross section of things students would see.”

In addition to the robotic patients, 50 per cent of the time students in the lab work with standardized patients who are played by actors. The actors have prepared stories, case histories and personality types which Sinclair said adds a different level of realism.

Read the full article: Western’s new robots offer nursing students life-like medical experience


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Regional EMS Cadet Competition Utilizes Simulation For Recognition of Leading Students

South Orange Rescue Squad Cadets Bring Home Gold

Shouldnt all EMS programs utilize simulation for demonstration and training to new recruits on the lessons of first responding? Village Green NJ recently reported how last Saturday the South Orange Rescue Squad won the 5th Annual Bayshore EMS Cadet Competition in Keyport, New Jersey at the Keyport First Aid Squad. What a great way to utilize simulations to encourage healthcare professionals of tomorrow!

This event brought Emergency Medical Services cadet teams from New York and New Jersey together for a two day event that combines EMS skill competitions, educational experiences, training, and socializing with like-minded peers. Many volunteer ambulance squads across the state have cadet programs where teenagers train alongside adult members to provide emergency medical care to their community. Explained South Orange Rescue Squad President Troy Balog, “these cadet groups are valuable feeder programs to help critical volunteer shortages in squads.”


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He added, “we’ve had our cadet program for three years and many former cadets are now active adult members, including our current 1st Lieutenant! We are all volunteer, do not charge for our services and exist on donations, so people who give so much of their time are highly valued.” Competing against 35 other cadet teams, the South Orange Rescue Squad team won both first place in the “Advanced Team” category as well as the “Grand Champion” award for highest all around score. This is the first time the South Orange squad has entered the competition. “I wasn’t sure what to expect.” said team member EMT Cole Fitzsimmons, “we train a lot at South Orange so I felt that we were ready for it.”

Cadet teams could enter the “Basic” level competition or the “Advanced” level. Basic teams consisted of CPR or first aid trained cadets and were evaluated in stations consisting of Vital Sign, CPR, and bleeding control. The “Advanced” teams had to have at least two Emergency Medical Technicians and their three stations consisted of a simulated fall down to flights of stairs with two broken legs, a Heart Attack/Cardiac Arrest simulation, and a serious car accident where two critical patients were entrapped in the vehicle. “For the car accident station we had to work with the fire department to use the Jaws of Life to remove doors from the vehicle,” shared EMT team member Victor Rothstein. The victims in each of the scenarios were either role played by a volunteer with medical make-up or a high-tech simulator mannequin. Cadets were evaluated in each station by Paramedics, EMT Instructors, or Physicians who provided detailed feedback to the teens after each test.

Summary of Product Demo Video Interviews from IMSH 2017 Trade Show Floor

imsh 2017

Hey Simulation Champions! Today we are sharing a comprehensive review of all the product demonstration interviews HealthySimulation produced exclusively from the International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare 2017 Orlando Tradeshow floor! These videos will help you to catch up with the latest news and information about innovative new products and services entering the field of healthcare simulation, so be sure to watch them all!


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Exclusive IMSH 2017 Exhibit Hall Video Interviews:

Finally, here is the HealthySim staff writeup about our favorite products from IMSH 2017!


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SWMI Sim Lab and VR Room Helps Prepare Students for Real World Patient Encounters

SWMI Sim Lab and VR Room Helps Prepare Students for Real World Patient Encounters

Petty Officer 1st Class Jermia Douglas of the Surface Warfare Medicine Institute recently shared how the US Navy program is utilizing advanced simulation training with his articles “Train like you fight, fight like you train.”, posted on the dvidshub.net website:

In an effort to align training and fighting, Surface Warfare Medical Institute opened its first Simulation Laboratory (Sim Lab) with one simulator in a small room in October 2009. The main purpose for the Sim Lab was to provide a realistic type of training environment for students to safely practice medicine through repetition and hands-on practice. It also provided the capability to better train Independent Duty Corpsmen (IDC) students through the use of advanced technology. This provided the students with the same opportunity that is offered to students of civilian medical fields such as nursing and allied health professional training programs.

A few years after the introduction of the Sim Lab, a Virtual Reality (VR) room was built in December 2013. The VR rooms provided the same experience as the Sim Lab while enhancing simulated environments of the Middle East and onboard ships. Currently the VR rooms are used by instructors and students at SWMI and have the ability to add physical stressors to enhance the experience for the students. Smoke, dim lighting, changes in sound, background videos, and various props can be introduced to heighten the experience. This type of capability is designed to bridge the gap between practical scenarios and real world patient encounters.


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“It’s a controlled environment where students can get hands-on experience before they go out to the fleet,” said Lt. Hope Moore, physician supervisor for trauma at SWMI. “One of the most significant aids is the development of muscle memory, so that when it comes to treating an actual patient it’s a much smoother process.”

Muscle memory consolidates specific motor tasks into memory through repetition and many of the instructors believe that using the Sim Lab and VR room enrich classroom learning through hands-on practice. Students are able to practice procedures and scenarios in a safe and controlled environment as often as they need. This gives students the chance to practice before they are assessed on their abilities.

SimGHOSTS President Dr. Scott Crawford Closes 23rd Annual SESAM 2017 Conference In Paris

simghosts sesam

Today in Paris France, Dr. Scott Crawford, Volunteer President of SimGHOSTS (The Gathering of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists) provided the closing keynote address for the 23rd annual SESAM Event. For the first time, The Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine partnered with SimGHOSTS this year to provide healthcare simulation technology specialist operations tracks.

Scott reminded the audience that simulation education requires a triangle of operations with three key categories: management, coordination, and technology. Dr. Crawford went into detail explaining the key areas for the successful operation of a healthcare simulation program including operations (policies and procedures), space and resources, and systems integration. The operations/technology specialist covers:

  • Logistics supervision
  • Cost containment
  • Data collection
  • Personnel coordination
  • Modality selection
  • Innovation
  • Integration

Scott reminded the audience about the need to consider the “Technology Adoption Model” and the “Perceived Ease of Usefulness”, key requirements that enable healthcare professionals to consider, adopt, and expand the use of simulated, or other advanced, learning technologies. He then covered important considerations for key emerging technologies such as 3D printing, Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, equirectangular video recording, moulage staging, advanced scenario development, innovative simulated task trainer development, and support of emerging technologies such as eye tracking systems.


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Scott had the audience consider that it was only in 2007 that the first smart phone device was released with the iphone, and in only under 10 years, internet traffic has shifted from desktop to primarily mobile. Furthermore, only 1% of Doctors interviewing in 2016 had ever worn of VR headset. Scott asked that if technology allows for advanced specialized training to be recorded and transmitted around the world instantly — why are we not utilizing those opportunities more frequently?

Scott closed by suggesting that these technologies can be integrated over time, but to more forward without addressing a plan for their integration would be to become lost in the evolution of the medicine.

Learn more by visiting the SESAM and SimGHOSTS websites!


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Military Simulates for TeamSTEPPS: Communication Practice is Key

Communication is key for Army Reserve medical professionals

News worthy report today from “defense video imagery distribution systems” on how simulation is being utilized by the 807th Medical Command’s 228th Combat Support Hospital based out of San Antonio, Texas attend a three-day training exercise on 2-4 Jun. at the the Mayo Clinic Multidisciplinary Simulation Center located in Rochester, Minnesota.

ROCHESTER, MN — The medical facility is bustling. Patients are being received and then whisked away from the emergency room to the intensive care unit or operating room or treated and prepared for movement to other facilities. The loud sounds of a helicopter overhead are an audible sign that the medical teams need to prepare for new patients, even as they manage the patients currently in front of them.

Though this chaotic scenario sounds like something from a movie, this is a very realistic environment for military personnel serving overseas with Combat Support Hospitals and Forward Surgical Teams. This is an environment recreated at the Mayo Clinic Multi-disciplinary Simulation Center to provide Army Reserve medical units and healthcare providers the opportunity to work together in a realistic, theater-specific setting that replicates typical injuries and focuses on teaching and incorporating TeamSTEPPS into Army Reserve processes in an exercise environment.


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TeamSTEPPS is the Department of the Army’s patient safety framework adopted by the Army Medical Command to enhance healthcare team performance and improve patient safety. The training audience for this particular exercise is the Soldiers from the 807th Medical Command’s 228th Combat Support Hospital based out of San Antonio, Texas. The exercise held 2-4 Jun. provides a crawl, walk, run format for the Soldiers. Col. Elizabeth Anderson, Medical Readiness and Training Command’s exercise director for the simulation center’s TeamSTEPPS exercise, explains why this training is so important.

“My favorite part of being an OC/T is making the experience interactive between the medical personnel and the patient. These are manikins, so we create noises and response to make it more realistic for Soldiers, to make them consider this as a real patient so that their stress level starts to go up, and then we can start to see the reactions we are looking to fine tune,’ said Elliott. The end-state is trained and ready Soldiers equipped with the knowledge and experience to utilize TeamSTEPPs during the delivery of care. “We are looking for the participating unit to apply the teamSTEPPS principles in a variety of combat casualty scenarios. One of the things we did at MRTC is we used some of the information in the joint trauma registry – patients that had actually been cared for and had been uploaded into the registry, and we used those to create scenarios that could be implemented here in the simulation center. We’ve got twenty of those scenarios with all the information that we need to treat the patients and move them through the hospital,” said Anderson.

Curtin & George Washington Universities Collaborate to Build Jim: Simulated Virtual Reality Patient

jim empathy simulator

Recently the website Study International spent some time with the Faculty of Health Sciences at Curtin University in Australia to learn more about their collaborative project Jim. Build with George Washington University in the US, Jim is a virtual reality creation, designed to simulate patients for healthcare sector trainees.

Study International Interview Excerpt:


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Ranked in the world’s top two percent by the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2016, Curtin University has trained more health professionals than any other tertiary institution in Western Australia. The use of state-of-the-art training tools and high-tech simulation experiences is central to the curriculum at Curtin’s Faculty of Health Sciences. Such technologies enable students to gain confidence and competence in their clinical skills without putting actual patients at risk, challenging them to deal with real-world clinical situations in a safe and supportive environment. 

“Jim gives students the opportunity to practice in a safe, controlled, repeated way, so they’re less at risk to the general public when they go into their clinic training,” says Dr Janet Beilby from the School of Psychology and Speech Pathology. Students studying Speech Pathology, Psychology, and Physiotherapy, along with many other health degrees, get the chance to interact with Jim and learn from their mistakes before encountering real patients. The Faculty takes virtual reality a step further with their Virtual Home Visit (VHV) Training Tool, or as Curtin calls it, “a serious game”.

This innovation from the Curtin research team, in partnership with software developer Learnbrite, is a game-based learning system that allows physiotherapy students to simulate a home visit to elderly people, offering support to allow them to remain at home and independent. The learner interacts with client avatars, identifies fall risks and hazards and then formulates a specific management plan that will allow the client to remain at home. Students can do this online, or via a laptop or iPad, but – even better than that – can immerse themselves in the virtual world with a VR headset.

Read more about Jim and the Curtin Simulation Program on the Study International Website!

Singapore Simulation Symposium “S3” Has Extended Abstract Deadline to June 30th!

singapore healthcare simulation conference

This October 31st – November 3rd, SESAM, SimGHOSTS and SingHealth are combining powers to create the S3 Simulation Conference event in Singapore, the World’s first multi-organizational simulation event! And great news — the abstract submission deadline has been extended until the end of this month — so there is still a bit more time left to submit and join us this November!

About the S3 Event

Bringing the World of Medical Simulation Together​ The S3 Conference brings together thought​ leaders and cutting-edge ideas from three renowned simulation centers to one place – Academia, located in Singapore General Hospital Campus, Singapore.

Hosted by the SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), the S3 Conference 2017 is jointly organized by SIMS, Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM) and The Gathering Of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists (SimGHOSTS).


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This international tripartite part​nership will provide participating healthcare simulation teams with the best learning and networking opportunities with leading experts worldwide. The S3 Conference aims to be at the pulse of Asia’s simulation industry and to lead the transformation of simulation in the region and beyond.

The theme for the S3 Conference​ this year is, “At the Crossroad of Simulation; Bringing the World together”. ​​​​

Expect transformative sessions with international guest speakers, experience the latest in simulation technology, take in new ideas, share simulation best practices across borders, present ground-breaking simulation studies to fellow industry insiders, receive hands-on training in advanced simulation procedures, and more.​

Learn more and submit your abstract today on the S3 website!